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3une 1904 



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The St. Mary's Muse. 

COMMENCEMENT NUMBER, 



Vol. IX. 



June, 1904. 



No. 1. 



Bishop Bratton's Visit and the 
Baccalaureate Sermon. 



Amid the many events of the re- 
cent happy Commencement season 
the undisputed feature was the visit 
of our Bishop Bratton, late Rector 
of St. Mary's. From September 
onward the school looked forward to 
May to bring the new Bishop back 
to his own again, for every member 
of St. Mary's calls Dr. Bratton her 
friend. When on May 20th he ar- 
rived at an unexpected hour, girls 
and teachers vied with one another 
in enthusiastic greeting. Owing to 
the number of his engagements, even 
after his long trip from his distant 
Diocese of Mississippi, the Bishop 
could only remain at St. Mary's over 
Sunday, but every moment of his 
stay was enjoyable. It was a gen- 
uine privilege to have him with us, 
and a keen pleasure to hear him ex- 
press his approval of the new ad- 
ministration and its policy. 

The purpose of this visit was pri- 
marily to deliver the Baccalaureate 
Sermon to the Class of 1904. The 
limited capacity of the chapel, prac- 



tically confining the hearers to mem- 
bers of the school, was the one regret 
of the occasion. We can give here 
but a small idea of the power and 
force of the sermon. Founding his 
address on verses 26-29 of the 12th 
chapter of the Epistle to the Hebrews, 
Bishop Bratton first spoke of the 
meaning of Commencement to the 
young life, in part as follows: 

"Commencement time in our col- 
lege life, beloved, marks an impor- 
tant epoch, an epoch filled with man- 
ifold varying emotions and impulses 
which the boldest of us would not 
dare attempt to analyze, and the full 
force of which the wisest of us feel 
powerless to measure. Yet it is an 
epoch which no one ever grows too 
old to recall with vividness, and 
which never fails to leave an impress 
lasting through life and influencing 
to the end. Without essaying to do 
what the boldest would not attempt, 
what the wisest feel powerless to do, 
I may yet venture to suggest at least 
a reason for the lasting powerful in- 
fluence upon the imagination of the 
chief factors in a Commencement 
occasion. And that reason, as I 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



think of it now, is this: that amid we coine now into full possession of 
all the conflicting emotions — the tri- ourselves, unshared by others, and 
umphs of literary conquest, which enter upon the realities and duties of 
has crowned years of toil ; the part- the larger life for which our ehild- 
ing from friends, the nearest and hood has been preparing us? And 
dearest which can be made in life this realization is necessarily accom- 
outside the home ; and from teachers panied by grave reflections and anx- 
who have had so large a share in ious questionings as the soul emerges 
making us what we are ; the last from the strong safeguards which 
longing looks, as though we would love has thrown around it in the col- 
burn the familiar scenes upon our lege home, out into the wide, wide 
very souls, upon the old campus and world of thought and activity in 
buildings, at the familiar room which which it must now take its place, 
having tenanted our bodies seems to and in which it must win its way by 
lay loving, detaining hands upon its own strength and its own exer- 
our very hearts — I say, amid all tions. Is it not this that deepens 
these conflicting sentiments which this powerful influence of Corn- 
fill our hearts, there is yet the over- meucement, and adds complexity to 
whelming knowledge, filling our the conflicting emotions which ac- 
minds full to bursting, that this company us through the festal days? 
Commencement time marks the di- The day of testing has come, the 
viding line between girlhood and testing not simply of one's proficiency 
womanhood — between the time of in languages or mathematics and the 
preparation in which others have like, but the testing of character — of 
been our guides, in which others that priceless possession which the 
have shared our responsibilities, in curricula of college training are in- 
which others have been responsible tended to develop and to educate in 
for us — between this time on the one the highest way. It has been under 
hand, and that other time in which test, we know, throughout our col- 
we ourselves are the helmsmen of lege career. It was always under 
our own crafts upon the great sea of test there, the testing which was in- 
life — in which we and we alone are tended to strengthen and which was 
responsible for ourselves, in which not allowed to break that which, for 
no one in the wide world can share the time, was being guarded from 
our responsibility. Is not that the the peril of overstrain and tension, 
reason for this lasting, powerful in- " But Commencement tells us that 
fluence of Commencement? that there is a testing before us unlike 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



any that has gone before, and differ- 
ent in its application from any that 
we have yet experienced. And the 
new and the untried fills us with a 
strange excitement about the issue 
of it. 

" Beloved, these emotions are sa- 
cred as they are powerful. They are 
the girdings of the strong young life 
to meet the conflict with courage. 
Rightly regarded now, and rightly re- 
membered in after years, and rightly 
used, they will prove great forces in 
your lives, for they are linked now 
with high ideals which you hold for 
yourselves, and which will ever be 
associated with the Alma Mater 
which has given you intellectual 
birth and inspired your highest 
moral aspirations. Take courage, 
beloved, take courage. Your future 
is in your hands — that is true, emi- 
nently true ; but something else is 
equally true — your future is in God's 
hands. It is God and you ; and 
your part well done, the issue is not 
even doubtful — it is sure. No lon- 
ger, when the Divine partnership is 
recalled and realized, does the ques- 
tion tremble upon our lips, ' What 
is to be the future?' It is asked in 
assurance of faith, and the auswer is 
already begun to be made in our set- 
ting forth upon the duties required. 
Among these duties, there is one 
which it seems to me most important 
to be considered at this particular 



time, when the world is being flooded 
with streams of religious thought 
which threaten the very life of the 
faith of many in our day. And so 
my subject for to-day is the duty 
which we owe to the religious thought 
of the day." 

The Bishop then entered into a 
full exposition of the text : " Yet 
once more I shake not the earth only 
but the heavens. And this word 
'yet once more' signifieth the re- 
moving of those things that are 
shaken, as of things that are made ; 
that those things which cannot be 
shaken may remain. Wherefore we 
receiving a kingdom which cannot 
be moved, let us have grace whereby 
we may serve God acceptably with 
reverence and godly fear; for our 
God is a consuming fire." 

The Bishop then clearly showed 
that the human mind is essentially 
religious and must always have some 
theory of divine life and these theo- 
ries have been ever changing along 
with all else human as the advancing 
ages have rolled by. In accordance 
with God's plan this progress has 
always been a growth, and must be 
so esteemed in religious as well as in 
secular matters. The earth — the sec- 
ular world — and the heavens — the re- 
ligious world — have again and again 
been shaken. Not the facts — they 
are permanent — but our opinion of 
the facts. The first century, the fifth, 



4 The St. Mary's Muse. 

the eleventh, the sixteenth and the vailing theories and opinions. We 

eighteenth centuries present periods are under divine education which is 

of restlessness in religious matters not yet complete. Therefore it is 

closely akin to the restlessness of to- our duty to prove what we hear 

day. Then, as now, "according as fairly, and hold only to what is true 

men look forward to the future with and improving and elevating to souls 

hope, or back to the past with regret, and bodies — to what makes for jus- 

they glory in our era as one of rapid tice and mercy and faith and hope 

progress for good or bewail it as an and love. Whatsoever does that 

era of rapid change and decay. But must come from God, must be by 

whoever is right we may be sure now the inspiration of the Holy Ghost, 

as then that ' the Lord has been sha- Above all, our duty is to measure 

king the heavens and the earth that what we hear by the Creed, and to 

those things which are shaken may hold fast that which reason, taught 

be removed, and those things which by the Holy Ghost, finds to be con- 

cannot be shaken may abide.'" sistent with it. This, beloved, as I 

We should not consider this an ir- believe, is our duty to the religious 

reverent age. " With increased thought of a day in which God is 

knowledge has come not increased shaking the heaven and the earth, 

doubt but increased reverence." We 'Wherefore we receiving a kingdom 

cannot and should not ignore the which cannot be moved, let us have 

religious theories of the day — of the grace whereby we may serve God ac- 

interpretation of the Scriptures; of ceptably, with reverence and godly 

moral retribution, and rewards and fear.' What does it mean ? Simply 

punishment, and so on ; but we may this : That the world may ba shaken 

not dogmatize or attempt to settle to its very bottom, that man's opin- 

these questions. "It is our duty to ions and theories may be dissipated 

have our theories in accord with the into thin air, that all things human 

best light we can get. As thought- and changeable may be utterly de- 

ful, educated Christians, we must stroyed, but there is a kingdom of 

face the questions and consider what Christ, not made with hands, which 

earnest minds are placing before us we have received, and in which we 

to be considered. Our attitude must are (except we be reprobate) which 

be one of caution, since our duty to nothing can destroy, and from which 

the religious thought of our day is as a firm vantage ground we can 

not simply to hear of it, but to con- cling to Christ, we can serve God, 

tribute to it as God gives us the abil- we can do good to our fellows, 
ity, to the improvement of its pre- 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



"And in conclusion : My dear 
young friends, one and all, but espe- 
cially of the Graduating Class, may 
God be with you during your pil- 
grimage in life, and may the Holy 
Ghost the Comforter, the Inspirer, 
the Revealer, grant you to have a 
right judgment in all the perplexing 
questions that must ever be arising 
for solution ; grant you to have a 
stroug, loyal faith in God and our 
Lord Jesus Christ; that you may 
rejoice evermore in His Holy com- 
fort." 



Commencement. 



The recent Commencement season 
formed a happy climax to the work 
of a successful year. The weather 
conditions were favorable, notwith- 
standing the warm spell ; the attend- 
ance at the exercises, as usual, was 
good; and those having a share in 
the exercises gained much credit for 
themselves and did honor to St. 
Mary's. 

Following the reception by the 
Faculty members to the active mem- 
bers of the two literary societies on 
Saturday evening, the exercises prop- 
er opened on Sunday, May 22, with 
the Communion Office in the Chapel 
at 7:30, with Bishop Cheshire as cele- 
brant and the Rector assisting. This 
was followed at the eleven o'clock 
service by the Baccalaureate Sermon 



preached to the Class of 1904 by 
Bishop Bratton of Mississippi, late 
Rector of the school. 

Monday evening at 8:30 the Ju- 
nior Concert of Music Department 
pleased an appreciative audience; 
while throughout the afternoon and 
evening the annual exhibit of the 
Art Department, which this year 
was exceptionally good, was open to 
the public in the Studio. 

Tuesday afternoon the Alumnse 
met in their annual session with the 
President in the chair. The attend- 
ance was small, but much interest 
was manifested, and some important 
business transacted. The old offi- 
cers were re-elected ; and it was de- 
cided to celebrate the 25th anniver- 
sary of the founding of the Asso- 
ciation next June by a banquet and 
silver coi lection. 

Tuesday niVht the Rector and 
Mrs. DuBose received the members 
and friends of the school in honor 
of the Class of 1904. The evening 
was thoroughly enjoyable. 

Wednesday afternoon the Trus- 
tees met in annual session at the 
school and transacted important busi- 
ness, including a decision to have 
the work on the Chapel proceed at 
once. Rev. Mr. Whitsell, the new 
clerical trustee from South Carolina, 
sat with the Board for the first time. 
Mr. Whitsell's visit was a pleasure, 
aud his interest a help. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Wednesday night the musical 
event of the year took place in the 
Pupils' Annual Concert. The or- 
chestra, and the vocal, violin and 
piano selections were all well ren- 
dered and much enjoyed. 

Thursday morning at eleven the 
graduation exercises were held. The 
audience, as usual, assembled in the 
parlor where the Salutatory was 
delivered by Miss Coleman of 
Georgia, — the Class Essay was read 
by Miss Means of Charleston, and 
the Valedictory spoken by Miss 
Brown of Raleigh. 

Then, following the old custom, the 
academic procession — trustees, fac- 
ulty, graduating-class and students — 
formed and marched to the Chapel, 
where the short service was said and 
Bishop Cheshire, President of the 
Trustees, delivered the charge to the 
graduating class and presented the 
diplomas. The Roll of Honor was 
then read by the Rector. 

The graduating class included 
Misses Brumby and Coleman of 
Georgia; Ann Gifford and Marga- 
ret Herbert of Virginia; Esther 
Means of South Carolina; Marjorie 
Hughson of Morganton, Carrie H. 
Moore of Littleton, Lucy Redwood 
of Asheville, Eliza Brown, Virginia 
Eldridge, Daisey Green, Elizabeth 
Massey, Elizabeth Skinner and Mar- 
garet Stedman of Raleigh. 



With these exercises the session of 
1904 was ended. 1904 were grad- 
uates; 1905 were Seniors. " Le roi 

L. 



est mort; vive le roi." 



Some Memories of 1903-04. 



The first school year of the ad- 
ministration of the new Rector, with 
whatever it had for each of us of 
pleasure and of pain, is numbered 
with the past. It had its share of 
sorrows and of disappointments as 
was to have been expected, but on 
the whole it was a good year and we 
are glad to have had a share in it. 

It is not my purpose here to re- 
view the year either from an acade- 
mic or a busiuess standpoint ; I leave 
that for older and wiser heads than 
mine; but I already find it pleasant 
on an idle summer afternoon to lie 
back in the hammock and let my 
thoughts wander over the pleasures 
of the year — mine and those of the 
other girls — and it is a retrospective 
glimpse at the social side of our 
school life at St. Mary's in 1904 that 
I am going to take this evening for 
the sake of those who read The 
Muse. 

Our little entertainments, public 
and private, general and special, for- 
mal and informal, were so many and 
so varied, that it is hard for me to 
recall them all, even should I wish 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



to do so, but some of them will be course we needed more rest. How- 
fresh in my mind for years to come, ever, the Chapter activity kept up, 
and many others, the details of which and the "Social Evenings" were 
I may forget, will leave a pleasant revived with vigor, while Mademoi- 
flavor of the year behind them. In selleGerber's delightful little French 
the fall the Chapters led our activi- play aroused our admiration, while 
ties and vied with one another in it made us almost tremble to be 
novel entertainment ; laugh-produ- Seniors. 

cing "Mrs. Wiggs," the "Great In November came the first of the 

State Fair," and the " Dutch Kitch- Senior Class entertainments, the full 

en" were fine, each in its own way. series of which gave the girls of '04 

Hallowe'en, too, thanks to Miss so much pleasure, and aroused so 

Checkley, gave us all pleasure, and much interest in us all, for are we 

we laughed and wondered, and won- not all to be Seniors some day, 

dered and laughed. sooner or later? (Can it be that my 

But the crowning delight of the day has really come?) We hear that 
fall was the presentation of "Alice we of '05 are to pay less attention 
in Wonderland " that the teachers to such functions next year, but if 
gave to the girls the very night be- so, theu we shall try to make up in 
fore we went home for the holidays, quality for the lessening in quantity, 
How we did enjoy it all! — and the though we can't much see how we 
dear little White Rabbit and Alice are to more than equal those of last 
will linger even the longer in our year, from Eliza Brown's dinner to 
memories because we shall have only Marjorie and Carrie Helen's "Rain- 
memory by which to cherish Miss bow Party." Bat I musn't think 
Thomas and Miss Busbee next year, too much of that, for our class is 
The Gryphon and the Mock Turtle! none too conceited now, is it girls? 
we can see them before us now almost Then Lent ! Ah, the form of our 
as plainly as on that December night, activities changed, but how good and 
It was a delightful treat, and we all restful the quiet was, and how greatly 
thoroughly enjoyed it and hope we we enjoyed the sweet services, and 
shall have another as good next year, the Rector's talks, and how much 

In the weeks between Christmas better we felt through them. We 

and Lent there was not much oppor- don't care to speak much of these 

tunity for entertainments; first, we things, but with all our lightness 

had to rest up, and then the examina- and brightness we don't forget that 

tions were upon us, and after them of- deeper and sweeter side of the school 



8 The St. Mary's Muse. 

life, and we think now more than all excited, and how thoroughly 
we perhaps seem to do of the end in both Sigma Lambdas and E. A. P.'s 
view, and we never forget what it longed for their champions to win. 
means to be a true St. Mary's girl. I expect we were rather more inter- 
The money the girls raised by their ested in that than in Japs or Rus- 
Lenten zeal — over a hundred dollars sians — and the suspense Judge Shep- 
— well, we are very glad that it herd kept us in when he came out 
pleased the Rector and our Direc- to announce the decision was so tan- 
tresses. We were not working just talizing. Some of us were pleased 
for that. and some were wofully disappointed, 
Easter! and the lovely Chapel, so much so that it seemed we never 
which has been the scene of so many could get over it, but we have, and 
blessed Easter celebrations, and now we can rejoice together thai 
which we hope another Easter day all the girls did so well, 
will find the same and not the same- — Public recitals in the Music De- 
the same in meaning and thought parttnent grew more and more nu- 
and memory, but more comfortable merous as the Spring advanced, and 
and more commodious, able to shel- we liked them all, especially Miss 
ter all who would enjoy its privi- Hull's orchestra and violin recital, 
leges. After every entertainment the corn- 
After Easter our dancing and gay- pliments — genuine ones, too — were 
ety began once more. The Dra- abundant. 

matic Club showed much talent and As the year went on, the mystic 

pleased all with its play, the success sororities grew ever more and more 

of which was due largely to Mildred mysteriously active. Every one 

Tilton ; and we must not forget that knows how fine the banquets were 

its financial success meant sixty dol- and how enjoyable the picnics, 

lars for the Chapel Fund. Aside But I must hurry. Why it is 

from the skilful acting we were glad almost time to dress,and my thoughts 

to see how handily and easily it is haven't nearly finished drifting. Let 

possible to do without the masculine me see ; is it a "germau " to-night? 

element, for we are so much nicer as Well, girls, I'll say nothing about it 

girls than as make-believe men, anyway, for I wouldn't have any of 

though we have no wish to be " fe- you envious. I know you are all 

male detectives," much as we admire having a good time — jnst like me; 

Mary Welles. and I — well, I realize that Septem- 

Froni drama to debate. We were ber is coming. X. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Subscription, One Year, 
Single Copies, 



One Dollar. 
Ten Cents. 



A Magazine published monthly accept in 
July and September at St. Mary's School, Ral- 
eigh, N. C, in the in teres c of the students and 
Alumnae, under the editorial management of 
the Senior Class. 



Address all communications and send all 
subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSK, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

CORRESPONDENCE FROM FRIENDS SOLICITED. 



Application made at the post-office at Raleigh, for admission to the mail as second-class matter. 



In the October '96 copy of The 
Muse, the editorial greeting runs as 
follows : • i The years that have 
passed since the last number of our 
magazine was issued have been so 
many that we are afraid some of our 
friends may have forgotten that our 
dear little paper ever existed, but we 
are very sure that all the girls who 
read and helped to make it will 
gladly welcome another copy of our 
old Muse, and that the welcome will 
be all the heartier because each year 
of absence only makes St. Mary's 
dearer to us all." It is with just 
this feeling that we now venture 
again upon an issue of the old paper 
in its old form. To some of those 
to whom it comes it will come as a 
stranger though we hope speedily it 
may establish itself as a friend ; but 
to many another may the little paper 
be as the return of an old and dear 
friend, come to revive the sweet 
memories of the past, and to awaken 
new and pleasant thoughts of the 
present and future. 



To every daughter of St. Mary's, 
to every friend of the dear school, 
the old Muse with new life brings 
greeting. It assures each one of the 
continued interest in her welfare 
that St. Mary's feels, and bespeaks 
an interest in the part of each, in 
the welfare and progress of Alma 
Mater. 

We know that St. Mary's daugh- 
ters are loyal ; we believe that they 
would like to be nearer to and 
know more of each other, and of St. 
Mary's and of its life to-day, and so 
with a two-fold purpose the monthly 
Muse again comes into being. 

We hope to bring the Alumna? 
into closer relationship; and to keep 
them better informed about us and 
about each other; and we want the 
girls of the present day to know 
more of the St. Mary's of the past, 
and of the elder sisters (mothers 
some of them are to some of our 
present girls), whom they can be 
proud of and look up to as exam- 
ples. 



10 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



With the issue of this Commence- 
ment number The Muse once more 
returns to its original form. The 
Class of 1905 has decided to under- 
take its publication as a monthly 
without abandoning the year book 
publications of the classes of '02, '03 
and '04. This copy, a forerunner, 
will be followed in August by a 
Summer number, and from October 
to April it is hoped to publish the 
magazine monthly. The annual 
class-book will be published in May. 

The monthly Muse will aim to 
contain all the current news of the 
school, its progress, condition and 
plans ; and as full reports as possi- 
ble of the Alumnae and matters of 
interest to the Alumnse. We know 
that the friends of St. Mary's are 
many, and we hope that every one 
will want to have regularly a copy 
of The Muse, and that each one 
will do what she can to help along 
the publication and insure its success. 

This issue will reach only a lim- 
ited number. Let each one who 
reads and is interested send in her 
subscription at once and show the 
paper to her friends, sj that the Au- 
gust number may reach twice as far. 
We want every old St. Mary's girl 
to get The Muse. We cannot ac- 
complish that at once, but with the 
co-operation of those who read the 
paper it can be brought about. 

Will you not write us if you are 



interested and tell us of someone else 
we would like to reach or you would 
like us to reach? Help us to find 
the old St. Mary's girls and help us 
to make new ones. 

We shall try to be interesting, try 
to bring you the news, and we hope 
to succeed in this, but especially shall 
we labor for the interests of St. 
Mary's and the welfare of her daugh- 
ters, and in this we ask the interest 
and co-operation of every friend of 
our dear old school. 



This number of The Muse will 
seem to some rather deficient in per- 
sonal notes. This is due chiefly to 
lack of space. We hope that as many 
as possible of the girls will write to 
The Muse before time for the August 
number and tell of their doings and 
plans. The Muse will thus prove an 
information bureau betv)een friends. 

Remember, all, that the publication 
of The Muse and its success depends 
upon its friends. Subscribe and get 
others to subscribe, and we hope to 
get larger with each issue. 
o 

Mr. DuBose was at home for the 
Convention, but had to leave for 
Wilmington the day after it closed. 
He spent the 14th at St. Mary's on 
his way to the Asheville Convention 
at Lincolnton, and from there his 
trip has led him through various 
points in South Carolina. He 
preached in Columbia on the 19th 
and expects to officiate in Charleston 
on the 26th. He reports a warm re- 
ception wherever he goes, and every 
one interested in St. Mary's. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



11 



Changes in the Faculty. 

It is always with keen regret and 
genuine feeling that we say " Good- 
bye" to a faithful teacher. This 
season the changes at St. Mary's are 
more numerous and important than 
usual, and the going will be remem- 
bered in love long after the coming 
have become our friends. 

Girls and teachers alike lament 
the departure of Miss Thomas. With 
her an important part of St. Mary's 
life seems to be missing. Through- 
out the years of her teaching she has 
been not only successively aud al- 
ways successfully the director of the 
work in Mathematics, English and 
Literature, but a power for good in 
every department of the school life 
and a real friend to every one with 
whom she was thrown. Though she 
feels it wise to leave us, her influ- 
ence, which for four years has per- 
vaded the entire school, will last, and 
the standard for which she worked 
will be our standard for years to 
come. We wish her every success 
in her new field, knowing full well 
what a blessing she will be wherever 
she goes. 

Misses Busbee and Trapier we 
give up with regret not only as effi- 
cient teachers but as daughters of 
St. Mary's. The one a graduate of 
our Class of '99, and the other of 
'01, they have each been with us 



two years, and we wish them " bon 
voyage." 

Miss Bell, though with us only 
one year, has established her repu- 
tation as an able teacher, and we feel 
sure she will win further success in 
other fields. 

As we speed the departing we wel- 
come the coming, feeling sure that 
we shall speedily be friends. Miss 
Shipp who succeeds Miss Thomas in 
the department of English and Lit- 
erature, is no stranger to St. Mary's. 
She was educated here, has taught 
here in years past, and is due the wel- 
come of an old friend. Since leaving 
us she has taught, studied and trav- 
elled extensively, and comes back 
fresh from a year in the Training 
School for Teachers, of Cambridge 
University, England. 

Miss Busbee is succeeded in the 
chair of German by Miss Chitten- 
den of New Haven, Conn. A grad- 
uate of the Class of '99 of Smith 
College, daughter of the Director of 
the Sheffield Scientific School of 
Yale University, and an enthusiastic 
Churchwoman, Miss Chittenden 
comes to us with the highest recom- 
mendations. She is an experienced 
teacher, aud has made a specialty of 
German in her studies here and in 
Germany. We greet her most cor- 
dially. 

Miss Balfour, who succeeds Miss 
Bell as Director of Elocution and 



12 The St. Mary's Muse. 

Physical Training, is a Southerner importance to St. Mary's. The 
by birth and training, though she delegates displayed a great deal of 
prepared for her work in the widely interest in the aftairs of the School, 
known Sargent's Dramatic School, and seemed much pleased at the en- 
New York. She has had success couraging reports. It is hoped that 
both as a reader and a teacher. She through the Agent, who will be ap- 
is enthusiastic and hopes to awaken pointed by the Executive Committee 
renewed activity in all lines of her of the Trustees at the request of the 
work. She will supervise the sports Convention, the debt, which now 
as well as conduct the regular physi- stands at $15,000, will be speedily 
cal culture classes. Through the Dra- wiped out, and every effort can be 
matic Club and Literary Societies, then concentrated toward preparing 
she will be able to be of much help to for the additions and improvements 
all the girls in and out of her Elo- in the equipment of the School that 
cution Department, and it is expec- are so much needed. 

ted that the department will grow w^ • 1 ,, , ., , 

. „ . , f . ., b Within a week or two the build- 

rapidly and healthily. .,, , . . 

r J J ers will begin the repairs to the 

_, , . _ . Chapel. Mr. Hodgson has taken 

Student Topics. ■, -, . •, ,, 

r down and stored away the organ, 

The Rector has been travelling until its new quarters are ready for 

almost constantly since School closed, occupancy at the opening of School. 

The Sunday after commencement It is ho P ed > too > that the new ] aun- 

he was in Beaufort and preached the dl T will be ready for use by that 

Baccalaureate sermon at St. Paul's time. 

School. He had a pleasant stay From the present outlook it seems 

here, and in the next ten days' home- that about three-fourths of the last 

ward bound, he paid flying visits to year > s gir]s will be back in School 

New Berne, Elizabeth City, Hert- anot h e r year. Those who have fin- 
ford, Edenton, Plymouth, Washing- ished their work here> or find it ad _ 
ton, Greenville, Ayden, and Tar- v j sa bl e to go elsewhere or to stay at 
boro, reaching home in time for the homGj wiI ] be much m j sse d, but there 
Convention June 8. wi H be a fine opportunity to welcome 
The North Carolina Diocesan Con- the newcomers. And so long as our 
vention, which met in Raleigh June space is so limited, the new girls can 
8 — 11, devoted a good share of its only have the chance when the old 
time to consideration of matters of ones have had their day. 



alumnae: matters. 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 

St. Mnry'9 Alumnae Association. means of keeping ill touch With 

President, - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. allimtise affairs. It is one of the 
v ,„„ (Mrs. M. T. Leak, Durham. , . c . . .. . . . 

„ M „„!L M < Mrs. I. M. Pittenger Baieigh. objects of this paper to furnish the 

presidents, j M rs. F. P. Tucker Raleigh. 

Sec-Treas., Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. means. 

Editors' Greeting. The Rector earnestl y desires to 
have the Alumnae thoroughly organ- 

In issuing this first number of the ized. To this end he hopes as speed- 
revived Muse, we hope to make it ily as possible, that branch chapters 
clear that the paper is equally for will be formed in each of our Caro- 
Alumnse and students — is as much lina towns in which three or more 
yours as ours. We look to the old St. Mary's girls are now living. 
Alumna? for interest and support, Without needing to visit Raleigh 
and hope that in addition to sub- and the school — though we shall al- 
scribing to the paper and reading it, ways be glad to see you here — the 
as many as possible will write to the members of such chapters can receive 
editors with suggestive criticism and all the St. Mary's news through the 
news. We promise that each nurn- paper, and be able to discuss the in- 
ber will contain a goodly amount of teresting points in their meetings. 
alumnae news, and the paper will In addition, each active chapter will 
be conducted as the official organ of receive a personal visit at least once 
the Association, publishing from a year, either from the Rector or 
time to time such official notices as Mrs. Iredell. If you will help this 
the President or Secretary may de- movement by writing to us and try- 
sire, ing to arrange to start a chapter in 

Many of the alumnse are at pres- your town, you will be helping the 

entmembersof the Association which St. Mary's, which we are sure you 

has done such effective work under love; and we will give you all the 

the direction of Mrs. Iredell j but help we can, whenever we can. 
every old St. Mary's girl should At the school there is now being 

unite with the organization and take made a systematic effort to collect all 

an interest in it, and we believe that the possible information about our 

many of those who now seem unin- old girls. In the new catalogue 

tere6ted would unite with it if there there is printed a list of the grad- 

were some frequent and regular uates of St. Mary's with their mar- 



14 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



ried names and post-office addresses 
so far as we could ascertain them. 
This list is not entirely accurate, and 
embraces only those of our girls who 
have completed the full course in 
the school since 1879. We want to 
know more about these and to learn 
all about the scores whose names do 
not appear in the list. Any infor- 
mation concerning any member of 
the Alumnse will be most thankfully 
received by the Rector or the Edi- 
tors of The Muse. 

Above all, let us feel that you are 
interested, if you want us to persist 
in our efforts in behalf of a cause 
dear to us both, and you must real- 
ize that it is far easier to feel the 
interest and sympathy when it is 
presented in tangible form. 



his wife, and of Rev. Dr. Bennett 
Smedes, their son and second Rector, 
to be known after them as "The 
Smedes Memorial Scholarship." 
Slowly but surely the fund has accu- 
mulated through the efforts of de- 
voted members until in the spring 
of 1904 it was possible to turn over 
$4,000 to the Trustees as an endow- 
ment. This was accepted, and after 
a competitive examination held in 
May, 1904, Miss Lillian Farmer, of 
Florence, S. C, the successful com- 
petitor, will enter St. Mary's in 
September as the first holder of the 
scholarship. 



The Enlargement of the 
Chapel. 



The Smedes Memorial Scholar- 
ship. 



In many ways the past year was 
a happy one at St. Mary's, but it 
was especially happy for the Alumnse 
Association as marking the comple- 
tion of the work undertaken twenty 
years before. The young association 
at a meeting early in the '80's decided 
to make its first work the raising of 
a fund of $5,000 to establish a full 
scholarship in the school in honor 
of the Rev. Dr. Aldert Smedes, 
founder and first Rector of St. 
Mary's, of Mrs. Sarah Lyell Smedes, 



Its first work completed, the Asso- 
ciation took up a second, and Mrs. 
Iredell has directed her efforts this 
spring and is now working to raise 
the necessary fund for the enlarge- 
ment of the Chapel, so dear to every 
St. Mary's girl, but sadly too small 
for present needs. It is very grati- 
fying to note that the efforts put 
forth have already been crowned 
with much success. At the June 
meeting Mrs. Iredell was able to 
report almost $1,000 in hand, and 
$1,750 of the $2,000 necessary to 
the general work is now in reach. 
Of this, $550 is the gift of the Dis- 
trict of Asheville, and $300 was con- 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



15 



tributed by organizations anioug the 
girls of the school of the past year. 

It is proposed to enlarge the 
Chapel by extending it at the Chan- 
cel end and adding two transepts, 
thus increasing the seating capacity 
from about 250 to over 500. It will 
require $2,000 to make the change, 
and there will then be an opportu- 
nity for friends who wish to do so 
to contribute various additions as 
memorials of their loved ones. Some 
of them have already been offered. 
It is hoped to begin the work at 
once and to push it speedily to com- 
pletion in September. 

In the August number of The 
Muse we expect to give a full ac- 
count of the work and a list of the 
contributors to the fund. Contribu- 
tions, small or large, will be gladly 
received. All contributions should 
be sent to Mrs. Mary Iredell, Ral- 
eigh, N. C. 

o 

Alumnae Notes. 



Among the old girls at Com- 
mencement this vear were Misses 
Ellen Bowen, '00, Portsmouth, Va.; 
Julia Bowen, Jackson ; Margaret 
Bridgers, Wilmington; Mary Hen- 
derson, '03, Salisbury ; Mary Hun- 
ter, '03, Warrenton ; Kate Meares, 
'03, and Rita Meares, Ridgeway, S. 
C; Irene Wood, Brunswick, Ga.; 
Anna Parsley, Wilmington ; and 



Katherine and Helen Brock, Loretto, 
Md. 

Sophie Wood and Margaret Pru- 
den of Edenton, and Margaret and 
Kinsey Boylan of Raleigh — all St. 
Mary's girls of recent years — are in 
the party which sailed this month 
for an European tour, chaperoned 
by Miss Jauie Ward of Raleigh. 

St. Mary's is well represented 
among the June brides of this year. 
They include Kate Hawley, '98, 
Fayetteville, who became Mrs. Ba- 
con, June 1st ; Lillie Hicks of Ral- 
eigh, now Mrs. Bancker Smedes of 
New York ; Olzie Clark of Wilson, 
who married Dr. John Rodman of 
Washington, N. C; Margaret Ma- 
son Young, Morristown, N. J., now 
the wife of Dr. F. S. Weisse of New 
York ; and Madelon Battle, Ashe- 
ville, who is to marry Capt. Han- 
cock of the English Army, July 2. 

Among the older Alumna in at- 
tendance at the recent Diocesan Con- 
vention as representatives of the 
Woman's Auxiliary were Mrs. W. 
L. Wall (Alice Collins, '80) of Dur- 
ham ; Miss Kate Cheshire of Tar- 
boro; Mrs. Frank Spruill (Alice 
Winston) of Louisburg, and Mrs. 
Walter Grimes (Annie Dugger, '89) 
of Richmond, Va. 

It was a pleasure to entertain Mrs. 
Wall and several other of the Aux- 
iliary delegates at the School during 
the Convention. 



18 The St. Mary's Muse. 



foster the Christian family life rather 

The Rector's Annual Report thao to develop a mere scientific 

to the Diocesan Council. sch ° o1 P lant '> ? et in the famil ? as 

[abridged.] well as in the machine, order and 

system cannot be ignored, and so 

The 61st session of St. Mary's there is always the effort to have 

opened September 17, 1903, with a just enough of quiet discipline to 

crowded school, aud from that time make life run accurately and also 

until Christmas many pupils were smoothly. 

refused because of lack of space in The Chapel is the heart of St. 

dormitory and dining room. After Mary's life, and feeling the necessity 

the Christmas holidays several failed for more space, the Alumnae have 

to return, but most of these places decided to enlarge the Chapel by 

were soon filled, and the register adding Transepts aud a Chancel, the 

shows 241 boarding and day pupils plaus are now in the hands of the 

during the year, coming from seven- architect, and it is hoped that work 

teen Dioceses aud Districts. may begin in the near future. 

It goes without saying that Dr. Outside of current expenses, the 

Bratton has been missed in every School has paid since last September 

department of St. Mary's life, but for Infirmary, boiler, insurance, in- 

as he had planned for aud carried terest on Cameron debt, aud money 

the work up to the very beginning borrowed for previous year, over 

of the new year, it may truly be said $6,000, and it is hoped to begin 

that this year has been but the con- building the steam laundry this 

tinuation of his former good man- summer, 
agement. St. Mary's, as the Church school 

The beautiful modern Infirmary for the Carolinas, is no weakling 

begun in May, 1903, was finished begging help to keep her alive; but 

and occupied in October, and under that she may grow stronger and more 

the care of a competent Matron and useful, she needs the loving consid- 

skilful physicians, makes the School eration and co-operation of every 

able, but not anxious, to handle, in Bishop, Priest and Churchman in 

the most scientific way, any sickness her particular field, and she cannot 

that may befall her pupils ; but there do her best work without that help, 

has not been one case of even alarm- Give her, therefore, your prayers ; 

ing sickness during the year. send her your daughters : so shall 

The whole idea of St. Mary's is to you and she do the Church's work. 



Location Central for the Carolinas. 

Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 

St. Mary's School, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

{for girls and young women). 
63d ANNUAL SESSION BEGINS SEPTEMBER 15, 1904. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGINS JANUARY 26, 1905. 






1. THE COLLEGE. 

. 2. THE MUSIC SCHOOL. 
St. Mary's 

offer* instruction in thesei 3- THE B USINESS SCHOOL. 
Departments: j 4 THE ART SCH QOL. 

5. THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL. 

In 1903-4 were enrolled 241 students from 17 Dioceses. 

Twenty-five Members in the Faculty. 

Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New. Twenty-eight 
Pianos. New Chickering Grand Piano Just Added. 

Special attention to the Social and Christian Side of Education without slight 
to the scholastic training. 

For Catalogue and other information address 

Rev. McNeely DuBose, B. S., B. D., 

RECTOR. 



\ 



September 1904 



Q& 







wmfi&M'& 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



VACATION NUMBER. 



Vol. IX. September, 1904. No. 2. 

St. Mary's School. lars remaiD due to the former own- 

ers, to which must be added five 

(Being an extract from the address of thousand dollars given to establish a 

the Bishop of North Carolina to his scholarship, and, with the consent of 

Convention in Raleigh, June 12, , , . . n 

iqq. s the donor, invested in our own debt. 

Besides this, over fifteen thousand 



Seven years ago, in the city of dollars has been spent upon the 
Raleigh, the Convention of this Dio- equipment and permanent improve- 
cese, accepting the action of their ments. Something like thirty-five 
Committee appointed at Charlotte in thousand dollars has been paid for 
1896, established St. Mary's School St. Mary's School in this Diocese 
as an institution of the Diocese, and alone, directly and indirectly, dur- 
endorsed the action of the trustees iu ing these seven years. When the 
contracting for the purchase of the Rev. Dr. Bratton was called from 
site and buildings at the price of fifty the rectorship of this school to be- 
thousand dollars. Wise and good come Bishop of Mississippi, we fear- 
men in that Convention doubted our ed that the school had suffered an 
ability to carry through so large an irreparable loss. But in his succes- 
undertaking, but joined loyally and sor, the Rev. McNeely DuBose, we 
generously in sustaining the action have found one entirely capable of 
of the majority. With us East Caro- carrying on the work, and the past 
liua, Asheville and South Carolina year has not only held what had 
have joined in making St. Mary's been gained under Dr. Brattou, but 
the Diocesan School for girls of all has continued the steady upward 
the Carolinas. At the end of seven movement, and to-day St. Mary's 
years we see the school prosperous School is stronger in the confidence 
beyond our hope, and scores of ap- and affection of our people, and in 
plicants applying for admission every its organized power for doing its 
year beyond our capacity to receive work, than ever before. 
them. Only fourteen thousand dol- But it is becoming more and more 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



evident every year that we cannot 
sit down contented with this measure 
of success. Twenty-five years ago 
such success as the school has now 
attained would have left nothing to 
be desired. But the world has chan- 
ged, and its demands have changed. 
The standards of education have ad- 
vanced. New institutions — public 
schools, endowed schools and col- 
leges, have sprung up all around us. 
The intellectual culture which a 
quarter of a century ago could be 
found for our girls only at St. Mary's, 
and a very few like schools in this 
State, can now be had in every one 
of our larger towns, and in innu- 
merable institutions of higher grade. 
Almost every one of those Southern 
Dioceses from which our pupils have 
been drawn, has its own Diocesan 
school, or is preparing to have it. 

St. Mary's School still stands at 
the head of all our Southern Church 
Schools for Girls ; but it can not re- 
tain its prominence as a mere matter 
of sentiment and tradition. To do 
the work before it, to maintain its 
primacy, and to meet the responsi- 
bilities of the situation, it must de- 
velop those courses and those de- 
partments which supplement the 
training of our local schools, whether 
public schools or Church institutions; 
and must be to them what the col- 
lege and the university are to our 
academies and high schools for boys. 
We have not chosen this work for 



St. Mary's School ; in the providence 
of God it is being thrust upon us 
by the actual conditions of our 
Church life. Dr. Bratton foresaw 
this, and began to adjust the school 
to these new conditions the second 
year of his administration. The rest 
of us did not see it so plainly then 
as he did, but time is making it 
plainer. We have before us a great 
future for St. Mary's School, if we 
will see it and do our duty by it. It 
needs no violent revolution or extra- 
ordinary skill of management. It 
is a natural growth and development, 
if we will duly supply it with means 
of growth. I hope it may always 
be "St. Mary's School." In the 
vast multiplication of colleges and 
institutes and universities, the time 
is coming when to be St. Mary's 
School will be like a special distinc- 
tion of honor. But St. Mary's 
School should stand as the noble 
crown upon the rising structure of 
our Southern Church Schools for 
Girls. 

I say therefore, to you, brethren 
and fathers of the Diocese of North 
Carolina, that you, our own people, 
who owe so much to this School, and 
to those noble men who founded it, 
ought to pay off that debt which 
still remains — the balance of the 
purchase money. If the rector and 
trustees of the School, while main- 
taining those modest charges which 
so widely extend the benefits of the 



The St. Mary's Muse. 3 

School among our people, can yet have rich men and rich women. And 
each year make some few hundreds, they must soon die and leave their 
or even thousands, of dollars profit riches for others. May God put it 
out of the School, that profit ought into their hearts and minds to see the 
to go to increasing the advantages great opportunity they have here 
and perfecting the equipment of the presented to them, honoring them- 
School, and to aidiug poor and prom- selves and their children, and leav- 
ising pupils unable to pay all their ing to their descendants a richer leg- 
expenses. Our Church people ought acy in the glory of a noble generos- 
to pay the debt and free the School ity than any mere gift or bequest of 
from that encumbrance. money alone. What investment can 

And further than this, we ought, they find for their increasing riches 

out of the abundance with which which can yield them such a profit, 

God has blessed us, to provide in the joy and satisfaction of seeing 

those additional accommodations and the Church and the world blessed by 

those buildings so much needed in their munificency ? How would the 

order to provide for an increased grace of such an act sweeten their 

number of pupils. There is no rea- memory, and give a double blessing 

sou why we might not double the to that inheritance which should still 

number of the pupils of the School, remain for their posterity? What 

if we had proper accommodations for security can they find so safe against 

them. We have deliberately chosen the vicissitudes of fortune and the 

to become a general institution for a mutations of human affairs, 

large section of our Southern country Last September, on my way to at- 

instead of a mere diocesan school, tend the Consecration of our dear 

Having chosen this sphere, it is our brother, the Bishop of Mississippi, 

duty to fill it worthily. I spent some hours in the town of 

And let us cease to expect others Anniston, Alabama. While there I 
to do this work for us. There was a visited St. Michael's Church, per- 
time when we could say that we were haps the noblest and most impres- 
poor and weak and unable to do sivechurch building in all the South- 
great things for ourselves. That ern country. Its cost must go up 
time is passed. We have in this into the hundred thousands of dol- 
Diocese, and in those associated with lars. It was built by the liberality 
us, ample means for doing all that of one generous man. In the day 
God requires of us, if we be willing of Anuiston's prosperity, he and his 
to use our means for God and for the brother were its richest citizens. He 
prosperity of His Kingdom. We built the Church in the immediate 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



neighborhood of his great iron works, 
for the benefit of the operatives, 
because he desired to dedicate some 
worthy portion of his wealth to the 
glory of God and to the welfare of 
his fellow-man. In the commercial 
reaction which followed the extraor- 
dinary development of Anniston, 
this man's fortune was entirely swept 
away. He lives there still ; and 
now he is a poor man. After he had 
lost all his fortune some one asked 
him if he did not regret the great 
sums he had spent upon the church, 
with its surrounding property and 
buildings. " No," he is said to have 
answered, " I thank God I did spend 
it so. That is all I have left. I can 
not lose that." Here we have a 
beautiful illustration of the truth ex- 
pressed in the epitaph which some 
rich man of the olden time is said to 
have had carved upou his tomb : 

" What I spent, I had ; 
What I saved, I lost ; 
What I gave away, that I have." 



ST. MARY'S TOPICS. 



Conversation. 



If you your lips 

Would keep from slips, 
Five things observe with care : 

Of whom you speak, 

To whom you speak, 
And lioiv and when and where. 

If you your ears 

Would save from jeers, 
These things keep meekly hid : 

Myself and I, 

And mine and my, 
And how I do or did. Anon. 



The Chapel. 

The Chapel is the heart of St. 
Mary's as every true daughter knows, 
whether she be a last year's graduate 
or a far-off child of the forties, for 
whom Life has set stamp and seal 
upon the truth and beauty of the 
lessons learned within the Chapel 
walls. 

In the early years of the School's 
history, the Chapel occupied the first 
floor of the East Rock Building, 
and the little closet opening into 
the room now kuown as Miss Bow- 
eu's recitation room, was the robing 
room. In this Chapel Mary Vir- 
ginia Proctor was baptized, and af- 
terwards presented the font. This 
font and the Communion Service, 
given by the girls about the same 
time, have been in use ever since. 

In 1854, the present Chapel, de- 
signed by Upjohn, was built by Mr. 
Cameron, but the stone steps and 
the south window, over the door, 
were put in by Dr. Aldert Smedes. 
Almost every St. Mary's girl for 
more than forty years has carried 
home with her, among the treasured 
souvenirs of her school life, a pic- 
ture, whether water-color, pencil 
sketch or photograph of this little 
Chapel, standing in peaceful silence 
under the lofty arches of the oaks. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



In 1878, Dr. Bennett Srnedes, 
then Rector of the school, bought 
and put into the Chapel the organ, 
which has been in use ever since, and 
which, at his death, Mrs. Bennett 
Srnedes gave as a memorial to her 
husband. The other memorials in 
the Chapel are the lectern, given in 
1872, by St. Mary's Alumnae at the 
semi-centennial reunion, in memory 
of Dr. Aldert Smedes ; the tablet, in 
memory of Dr. Aldert and Dr. Ben- 
nett Smedes ; the window, in memory 
of Miss Elizabeth Dancy Battle; 
the altar-rail, given after the 
"switch-back" accident, in memory 
of a great mercy ; the vases, in mem- 
ory of Mrs. Theodore Davidson 
(Sallie Carter's) mother ; and the 
brass cross and hook rest, on the altar 
rail, given in memory of Caroline 
Alston. 

And now, in answer to the ever 
increasing demand for more room 5 
this little Chapel has given place to 
a newer and larger Chapel. We 
shall give an account of the changes 
in detail, doing as we would be done 
by, were our school days a thing of 
the past. 

The original building stands al- 
most intact, as the nave of the pres- 
ent Chapel. Two transepts have 
been added, an organ chamber in the 
northwest corner, and a robing room 
in the northeast corner, and an en- 
tirely new recess chancel (the gift of 
the Jurisdiction of Asheville.) The 



corners of the transepts are arched 
and open so that the chancel may be 
seen from all parts of the Church. 
There are three steps from the nave to 
the choir, one step from the choir to 
the sanctuary, and the altar is on a 
step seven inches in height, so the altar 
is raised about thirty-five inches 
above the nave. The chancel window 
is depressed Gothic, eight feet broad 
by seven feet high. The old chancel 
window has been placed in the west 
transept, while in the east transept 
is a door with a window over it. 

The side walls are plastered from 
wainscoting up to the roof plate, 
then ceiled with pine, the dressed 
beams being left in view. At pres- 
ent the building is to be lighted by 
gas, but it is being wired for elec- 
tricity in the future, and an entirely 
new heating system has been ar- 
ranged. We hear there are to be 
several new memorials, which we will 
tell you of in a later issue of The 
Muse. D. 



11 Mindab." 



Mindab is dead. This news will 
recall to many a fluffy yellow ball of 
a kitten, in the East Rock ; no re- 
specter of persons, upsetting any- 
body's work basket, tangling any- 
body's ball of yarn, playing with 
anybody's ribbons, and when he was 
tired, sitting in anybody's lap with 



6 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



or without invitation, and why not? 
was he not in his very own home, in 
his own mistress' sitting-room, and 
was he not there for the purpose of 
making merry with the Faculty ! 

There was in the room a small 
table laden with tea things very pre- 
cious, as each cup and saucer repre- 
sented its separate owner's all, and 
stood for cheer and comfort and a 
hour each day. 

Was " Min" a vain kitten or did 
he like to tease? He certainly look- 
ed very graceful and pretty, but he 
also looked very mischievous when 
he chose this table for a play-ground, 
followed by many anxious eyes, until 
he would spring lightly to the floor 
without hurting or touching the 
treasures and roll over and over as 
if laughing and saying, " it's just as 
easy." 

He was much interested in watch- 
ing people write, and he thought he 
could learn, but he could never per- 
suade any one to let him hold the 
pen, though he tried hard, particu- 
larly on Sunday nights, when every 
one seemed so busy with letters. So 
he contented himself with looking 
on and awaiting an opportunity when 
swiftly and gently he would put his 
paw upon the shiny black puddle 
on the page — and the letter was sent 
with " Mindab, his mark," in lieu 
of a written word. 

He had a great fright in his youth. 
It was before Xmas, when the ladies 



were busy stuffing cats for Santa 
Glaus, and having finished one set, it 
upou the floor to be admired. "Min" 
rushed gayly in upon the scene. He 
stopped, crouched, gazed — appalled, 
fascinated, and when the terrible 
creature, a cat, yet not a cat, would 
not speak or move, but continued to 
stare him out of countenance, he 
suddenly thought " it is a ghost," 
and trembling in every limb, with 
hair standing on end, and back 
arched high, he moved slowly out of 
the room. Whether it was this ex- 
perience or whether it was he did 
not admire the treacherous feline na- 
ture as foreign to his own, he never 
cared for cats, but chose his friends 
among dogs and men. 

"Min" swiftly outgrew the frivoli- 
ties of youth and developed a charac- 
ter in keeping with the dignity of his 
name, Mindab Kester. He was a 
great lover of nature, and would sit 
by the hour in the sunny window 
framed by the Marechal Neil rose 
vine aud watch the insects, birds and 
lizards. In all his life, no one ever 
knew him to lose his temper, except 
when Miss Fenner pulled his tail to 
make him say, " M-e-o-uw !" 

He was not demonstrative, but he 
was constant in his affections, and he 
loved Miss Katie. When she re- 
turned to St. Mary's after the long 
vacation, he would follow her about 
like a dog, occasionally rolling over 
in the grass to express his delight in 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



the situation. But as he grew older 
he lived more and more alone, as oue 
who would say, " I am no loDger a 
part of the geueral scheme ; other 
times come on apace ; my generation 
lies buried under the earth ; what 
do I here ?" 

He died unobtrusively, and there 
were no funeral ceremonies, but he 
rests in peace, and his friends will 
miss him. We of the twentieth cen- 
tury are wise, very wise, but do we 
know all the secrets of life and death? 
Who shall say that after this life 
wpH spent, " Mindab Kester " may 
not wake in a beautiful new world, 
with " Runt Harvey," " Duke 
Smedes," "Micky Jeudwiue," and 
other lost companions. M. 



St. Mary's at the S. M. T. A. 



At the meeting of the Southern 
MusicTeachers Association at Gaines- 
ville, Ga., last June, there were rep- 
resentatives from Washington, D. 
C, from Virginia, Tennessee, North 
Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, 
Alabama and Mississippi. Among 
the North Carolina delegates were 
three of St. Mary's Alumnae — Miss 
Mattie Higgs, who was demonstrat- 
ing the Burrowes' Kindergarten 
Method; Miss Addie White of 
Salisbury, and Miss Dowd of Ral- 
eigh. Miss Hull and Miss Pixley, 
who expected to attend the meeting 



and take part in the musical pro- 
gramme, were prevented by sickness 
from being present. 

The meeting was a delightful one 
both musically and socially. The 
object of this Association is to pro- 
mote the love of music and to in- 
crease musical advantages iu the 
South. The most interesting subject 
under discussion was the question of 
musical libraries in connection with 
the State and City Associations aud 
the Women's Clubs in the towns. It 
is hoped that this idea, now in em- 
bryo, may by earnest effort of the 
members and the assistance of all 
music lovers in the South, be de- 
veloped into practical working order 
by the next annual meeting of the 
Association. 

Mr. Jeudwine, formerly of St. 
Mary's who had been for two sue 
cessive years (which is the limit of 
time allotted by the by-laws), Pres- 
ident of the Association, and had 
during his administration, infused 
new life and enthusiasm into the or- 
ganization, increasing the member- 
ship eight fold, .retired from office 
and Mr. Nelson of Knoxville, Ten- 
nessee, was appointed his successor. 

Artistic piano recitals were given 
by Mr. Pfefferkorn of Brenau Con- 
servatory ; by Miss Maria Von Un- 
schuld, President of University of 
Music, Washington, D. C, and by 
Miss Leata Hartley of Petersburg, 
Va. 



8 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



A Providential Escape. from his injuries just as it came up." 

Mr. G. then goes on to say that 

Many St. Mary's people will have Mrs. R. was probably fatally in- 
heard rumors of the terrible accident jured, and Mr. T. painfully, but 
in which Elmer George had such a except for the intense nervous shock, 
narrow escape while she was visit- a sprained ankle and some scratches 
ing relatives in Georgia, in August, and bruises Elmer escaped. He 
We are glad to be able to state the hopes that she will be sufficiently re- 
facts from a personal letter of her covered to be back at St. Mary's for 
father to the Rector : " On the 3rd the opening. All of us rejoice at 

her providential escape from more 
serious hurt. 

With the Class of '04. 



of August Elmer, who was on a 
visit in Marietta, Ga., was invited 
bv a Dr. Reynolds to take a ride in 
his automobile. Dr. R.'s wife and 
a Mr. T., all of Marietta, were the 
other members of the party. They The clags of 1904 , g member8 are 

made the trip to Atlanta, twenty a l rea dy scattering to different points, 
miles, in the afternoon, went to see a 



ball game, and started back about 
seven o'clock. About six miles out 
the motor was going at a high rate 
of speed down a steep grade, when 
Dr. R. lost control. The machine 
apparently turned a complete somer- 
sault. All were thrown out, of 
course. When Elmer regained con- 
sciousness, after some time, she found 
herself in the dark, Mr. T. under 
the motor in great pain, Dr. and 
Mrs. R. lying unconscious. Elmer 
helped Mr. T. from under the ma- 
chine, made Dr. R. and his wife as 
comfortable as possible, and she and 
Mr. T. after awhile managed to get 



Bessie Massey will teach this ses- 
sion in the Jasper, Florida, Normal 
School. Lucy Redwood will teach 
in St. Paul's School, Beaufort, N. C. 

Eliza Brown will enter Trinity 
Annex, Durham, and Marjorie 
Hughson will go to the University. 
Kittie Coleman will spend the winter 
in Brooklyn, pursuing further study. 
Minnie Burgwyn, to whom we owe 
an apology for omitting her name 
from the list of graduates in the 
June Muse, and the rest of the class 
are undecided as to their future 
course, or perhaps are not willing to 
yet "show their hands" (literally 



word to a village, a mile away, and or % urativel y0 
phoned into Atlauta. An ambu- ° 
lance was sent out and got there Margaret DuBose spent the sum- 
about nine o'clock, but Dr. R. died mer at Sewanee with Daisy King. 



The St. Mary* Muse. 



Subscription, One Year, 
Single Copies, 



One Dollar. 
Ten Cents. 



A Magazine published monthly except in 
July and August at St. Mary's School, Ral- 
eigh, N. C, in the interest of the students and 
Alumnae, under the editorial management of 
the Senior Class. 



Address all communications and send all 
subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSK, 
EALEIGH, N. C. 



CORRESPONDENCE FROM FRIENDS SOLICITED. 



Application made at the post-office at Raleigh, for admission to the mail as second-class matter. 



EDITORIAL. 



As this number of The Muse 
goes out to carry greetings to its 
friends, we stand at the threshhold 
of a new school year. For some, and 
especially for us of the Class of 1905, 
it will be a crowning year — a year of 
privilege and of profit ; to every one 
connected with St. Mary's we trust 
it will bring much pleasure and more 
benefit. 

The outlook for the new year is 
good. The lack of room prevents 
an increase in the number of the 
student body, but there is every in- 
dication that the new body in quality 
will show a high standard. Wil- 
mington will do herself credit both 
in numbers and quality. Hender- 
son does proportionately well. From 
the Carolinas, north, south, east and 
west, they come, and from scattered 
points further South, and in Vir- 
ginia, until on September 15th, the 
buildings will be filled to their ca- 



pacity, vacation habits will be put 
aside, and the work begin in earnest. 

It has been a good vacation for 
most of us. The season has been good, 
and the opportunities for pleasure 
have been varied and improved by 
many. We hear of St. Mary's girls 
travelling in every direction. Abroad 
and in California, our girls are stir- 
ring ; from Canada and from Mex- 
ico come reports of happy days and 
novel experiences. Some few have 
had to do more or less studying. 
That has not entirely iuterferred with 
any, but to some it has been hard. 
The reward is soon to be theirs. 

At St. Mary's quiet has largely 
reigned through the summer months 
in the grove, and to the passer-by 
there has been little evidence of life. 
A close glimpse would have showed 
a different condition. At a school 
vacation means not rest, but prepara- 
tion. The affairs of the old year 
straightened up, preparations for the 
new are already calling to action. 



10 The St. Mary's Muse. 

During July the Summer School larger things. The Chapel is coming 
at A. & M. kept Raleigh lively, and rapidly to completion and when fin- 
many of the visitors enjoyed a little ished will be a part of St. Mary's 
rest under our shade. The old girls in which everyone can rejoice and 
will miss some of that pleasant shade be proud. The old and yet not the 
on their return, for the east end of old — it preserves the traditions we 
the grove caught the full force of all cherish so deeply and yet with 
one of the fierce July storms, and its increased size and better arrange- 
six of its venerable guardiaus " bit ment, gives facility for the grasping 
the dust," including the old hickory of the opportunities which are ours, 
near the little bridge, and the oak The Rector after spending June 
which so proudly bore the banner of in travelling in the interest of the 
'04 in the spring tennis tournament, school, during July was with his 
The old oak in front of the Main family at Pigeon River and Ashe- 
Building, too, is gone, relieved of a ville on vacation. After a very 
slow death by the woodman's axe — pleasant trip they all returned to St. 
with all regretting the necessity for Mary's August 4th, and have since 
its removal. It is sad to see the old been at the school. Mrs. Seay, 
landmarks go, but their loss is being housekeeper, ever vigilant, has been 
filled wherever possible, and the on the scene all summer. The girls 
young trees are trying hard to grow will realize and appreciate her pres- 
to their appointed places. ence when they see how much she 

Another landmark passed away, has done for their comfort, 

too, in July, when yellow Mindab, Mrs. DuBose, School Mother, has 

dear old cat, so well known both in wrestled hard with the problem of 

and out of the dinning-room, gave getting every girl into just the place 

up the fight. Perhaps his feelings she would most like to be. It looks 

could not bear the thought of the easy, but then so does a Chinese puz- 

old Chapel becoming new and larger, zle until you try it. But girls are 

At any rate, not long after the ground very reasonable creatures, and we all 

was broken for the new foundations feel so sure of the Mother's interest 

he passed away, without doctor aud in us and love for us, that I know 

without nursing. His life's history each of us will at least try to be sat- 

a friend of other days has written isfied with the final arrangement, 

elsewhere in this paper. But we must not tell quite all the 

But while some things we would news, else the girls might have noth- 

like to have with us are gone, others ing to find out when they get back, 

have been preserved for better and We shall miss some old friends and 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



11 



miss theni greatly, but we wish them 
success wherever they are, aud we 
exteud a warm greeting to the new 
comers, and a very hearty welcome 
back to our old friends. 



Among the Girls. 



Emmie Drewry has just returned 
from a delightful visit to Charlotte. 

May Montague spent two months 
in California this summer. 

Josephine Boylan and Katie Bar- 
bee are now on a visit to California. 

Margaret Stedman, after a short 
visit to Olivia Lamb at Henderson, 
spent three weeks with Carrie Helen 
Moore. 

Virgilia Glazebrook, Stuart and 
Sara Jones visited Senah Critz in 
Winston, during the summer. 

Among the St. Mary's girls at the 
Exposition this summer we note the 
following : May Montague, Annie 
Montague, Katie Barbee, Josephine 
Boylan, Evelyn Weeks, Senah Critz, 
Annie Root, Margaret Smedes, Sadie 
Root, Mary and Helen Smedes, and 
Margaret Lee. 

Among the St. Mary's girls at 
Wrightsville during July, were Flor- 
ence Thomas, Caro Brevard, Mary 
Hunter, Janet Hawkins, Annie Tay- 
lor, Emmie Drewry, Agnes Makely, 
Muse Blount, Mary Robinson and 
Julia Haughton. 



Anna Ciark and Nau Smith vis- 
ited Josephine Bowen and Minnie 
Burgwyn during July. 

Mildred Tilton, after spending 
the. summer at Cloud Croft, New 
Mexico, will move this fall with her 
family to Kansas City. 

Sara Jennings has been travelling 
in the West, and is especially de- 
lighted with the beauties of Yellow- 
stone National Park. 

Esther Means enjoyed the early 
summer at her home in Charleston, 
but has lately been with friends in a 
New Hampshire camp. 

Elizabeth Temple, in distant Den- 
ver, after a decided struggle with 
her feelings, has decided to stay at 
home this winter , with her parents. 



A Geographical Love Song. 

In the State of Mass. there lives a 
lass I love to go N. C. ; no other Miss, 
can e'er, I Wis., be half so dear to Me. 
R. I. is blue and her cheeks the hue of 
shells where waters swash ; on her pink- 
white phiz there Nev. Ariz, the least 
complexion Wash. La. ! could I win 
the heart of Minn., I'd ask for nothing 
more, but I only dream upon the theme, 
and Conn, it o'er and Ore. Why is it, 
pray, I can't Ala. this love that makes 
me 111.? N.Y.,0., Wy. Kan. Nev. Ver. 
I propose to her my will ? I shun the 
task 'twould be to ask this gentle maid 
to wed. And so, to press my suit, I 
guess Alaska Pa. instead. — Brooklyn 
Eagle. 



12 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Brief Dreams of St. Mary's. 

AT THE BEGINNING. 

There is a rush and bustle all 
around me ; carriages go and come ; 
trunks are being unloaded, and girls 
run here and there, talking and 
laughing. Amid all the hubbub, I 
stand silent and wondering-. The 
stern front of the Main Building op- 
presses me; the Rock Houses seem 
to close me in. I turn and flee to 
the cool shade of the grove, realiz- 
ing too well that I am at last at St. 
Mary's. Soon the ringing of a bell 
calls me back. I must — 

I start up from the hammock where 
I have been dreaming in the shade of 
the trees. The tea bell is calling me 
from the house, and, picking up my 
well-worn catalogue, I walk back 
slowly in the sunset and sigh, wish- 
ing— 

AT THE END. 

How important we feel this last 
year; our very air stamps us as se- 
niors. The months pass quickly, 
enlivened by the round of duties and 
pleasures. We take our examina- 
tions and essays as necessary evils, 
and struggle through them with the 
thought — 

The last week has come, and St. 
Mary's grows dearer every day. The 
last lessons are said, the last exami- 
nations over. The gayeties of Com- 
mencement week are at hand. 



The day of days arrives; the par- 
lor and halls are crowded with friends 
who follow us as we march to the 
Chapel to receive our last words of 
advice. The Rector presents us with 
our diplomas and certificates, and we 
return to our seats with a proud feel- 
ing that we are able to conquer the 
world. 

We gather on the campus, in the 
shade of the oaks, and receive con- 
gratulations. Our pictures are taken, 
our last good-byes are said, and we 
begin to realize that for us it is all 



over. Ah, if — 



S. F. I. 



St. Mary's Notes. 

Jennie Murchison spent some time 
with Ida Evans at her new home in 
Warren ton, Va. 

The summer weather has been ex- 
ceptionally pleasant for visiting and 
enjoyment, and our St. Mary's girls 
have been improving every oppor- 
tunity for having pleasure, cement- 
ing old friendships and forming new 
ones. Among the numerous home 
parties have been those of Gertrude 
Winston at Durham in June, which 
included Josephine Boylan, Alice 
Spruill, Kate Horner, Stuart and 
Sara Jones ; and that of Margaret 
Herbert at Buckroe Beach in August, 
including Mary Dixon, Carrie Helen 
Moore, Hallie Robertson, Margaret 
Stedman and Kate Winslow. 



ALUMNAE MATTERS. 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 



St. Mery'8 Alumnee Association. 



Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

Mrs. M. T. Leak, Durham. 
Mrs. I. M. Pittenger Raleigh. 
Mrs. F. P. Tucker. Raleigh. 
Sec-Treas., Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 



President, 

Vicb 
Presidents, 



The Chapel Fund. 

The responses to the appeals for 
the Chapel Fund in the months since 
the Alumna? took up the enlarging 
of the Chapel as their next work for 
St. Mary's has been very gratifying 
as was noted in the June Muse. 
The contracts were let in the month 
of June, aud the work has been pro- 
gressing since, until, in spite of de- 
lays, it is hoped that the enlarged 
Chapel will be ready for use at the 
opening of the session, and for regu- 
lar services at latest by October 1st. 
It became evident, however, some 
weeks ago that there would be much 
more expense attached to the im- 
provement than was at first contem- 
plated. It was hoped that the en- 
tire cost would not exceed $2,000; 
but to bring about the changes in a 
manner calculated to reflect credit 
on the Alumna? and the School, 
more than $3,000 will be required. 
This of course means more work for 
the Alumna? and further appeals to 
the generosity of the old girls and 
their friends. The enlargement has 
been undertaken by the Alumna?, 



and we of the Alumna? must carry it 
through. The Chapel will be fin- 
ished very shortly, but we wish also 
to have it paid for. Shall we not 
each then bear this matter in mind, 
and try by a " long pull, and a strong 
pull, and a pull all together," to set- 
tle this question as promptly as pos- 
sible? 

The funds for the improvement 
have thus far come mainly from 
three sources : the regular and spec- 
ial donations of the St. Mary's 
Guilds in the various towns and the 
memorial and individual contribu- 
tions of friends of St. Mary's, which 
have from time to time been handed 
to Mrs. Iredell for this purpose; the 
Alumna? dues aud contributions that 
have been sent to Miss McKimmon 
with the moneys raised by the dif- 
ferent school organizations among 
the girls during the school year 1 904; 
and the special gift of the District of 
Asheville, which has undertaken the 
expense connected with the construc- 
tion of the chancel. These funds 
have been raised through the efforts 
of individuals in very small sums, 
which is as it should be. We feel 
that the Chapel should be not the 
gift of one, but of many, and that 
every St. Mary's girl, past or pres- 
ent, aud every friend of St. Mary's 
would wish a part in the work and 



14 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



the giving. There is still need of a 
full thousand dollars, so the oppor- 
tunity to have a part has not yet 
passed . 

o 

The District of Asheville and 
the Chapel. 

For some years the Guilds of the 
District of Asheville at work for St. 
Mary's have been actively engaged 
in the raising of a fund for the en- 
dowment of a scholarship. This 
fund has grown slowly, and the la- 
dies realizing that the greatest need 
at present is in the enlargement of the 
Chapel, have decided to give this 
fund toward the erection of the chan- 
cel in the new Chapel as a distinct- 
ive gift of the District of Asheville, 
and an appropriate inscription placed 
in the chancel will commemorate this 
fact. 

The ladies propose not only to 
give what they are now able towards 
making the chancel ready for pres- 
ent use, but they hope to add in the 
future a handsome window, and to 
continue the work by gifts of other 
adornments from time to time. The 
amount estimated for the cost of the 
present work, including hard wood 
floor, is $800. This sum, it is be- 
lieved, will be put in the hands of 
the Committee early in September. 

If our three Dioceses would take 
such an earnest and practical interest 



and would follow the lead of the 
District of Asheville in this work 
how great a help and blessing it 
would be to St. Mary's. 

Surely, every friend of the School 
will join in giving thanks and praise 
to the women of the District of 
Asheville. 



-o- 



With the Alumnse. 



Reba Bridgers and Clara Capehart 
spent a part of the summer at More- 
head. 

Mary Irwin Bridgers has been 
visiting in Atlantic City. 

Placide Bridgers spent the sum- 
mer on an island off the coast of 
Charleston. 

Mary Porter Ashe spent the sum- 
mer in Brevard, N. C. 

Patty Lewis, after spending some 
time in Chapel Hill, made a visit to 
friends in Virginia. 

Sada Hanckel spent the month of 
July in West Raleigh, with Miss 
Dowd. 

"The Ravs" (Jennie and Alice 
Ravenal), are spending several 
months in England. 

Mary Hanckel who has for sev- 
eral years been a student of the Art 
League, New York, spent a part of 
the summer at Ipswich, Mass., study- 
ing under Mr. Dow. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



15 



" Miss Slater " has spent a happy 
summer at Tours, France. She will 
resume her work in New York in 
the fall. 

Kate Meares '03, who attended 
the University last year, will teach 
during the coming session at St. 
Paul's School, Beaufort County. 

Marion Hanckel studied last year 
at the University of Chicago, and 
this year she will be at the head of 
the Kindergarten work in Charles- 
ton. 

Mary Grant Capehart, of Avoca, 
N. C, came to the A. & M. Sum- 
mer School and remained in Raleigh 
to finish the Business Course at 
King's College. 

Mrs. Charles Baskerville (Mary 
Snow) will leave her home in Chapel 
Hill to live in New York, where 
Prof. Baskerville ha« been called 
from the University at Chapel Hill 
to be Professor of Chemistry in the 
College of the City of New York. 

In addition to those announced in 
the June Muse, the following St. 
Mary's girls have been brides this 
summer: Maude Battle, who mar- 
ried Mr. Cowan of Radford, Va., 
Mary Renn who became the wife of 
Mr. Taylor of Durham, and Lucy 
Clifton, who married Mr. Samuel 
Boddie of Louisburg. 

On Commencement Day three 
members of the class of '84, Mrs. 



Herbert Jackson (Annie Philips), 
Miss Emmie Smedes and Miss Dowd 
were delighted to find themselves 
together again. 



Old Friends. 



All those interested in St. Mary's 
will feel an added interest in the 
renewed University of Cincinnati 
with which Dr. Dabney has lately 
cast his fortunes, when they learn 
that Miss Czarnomska and Miss 
MacVea, both in years gone by, po- 
tent influences in St. Mary's life, 
have accepted responsible positions 
with President Dabney. 

Miss Czarnomska, for many years 
teacher and then lady principal of 
St. Mary's, left Raleigh in 1887 to 
become Professor of Literature at 
Smith College. Ever since then she 
has labored there and made a great 
success of her department, which has 
grown wonderfully under her guid- 
ance. She now goes to Cincinnatti 
to be Professor of Literature and 
Dean of Women. 

Miss MacVea, St. Mary's '84, 
since leaving her post at the school 
as lady principal in 1900, has been 
Instructor in Literature at Peabody 
College, University of Tennessee, 
which she is leaving with Dr. Dab- 
ney to take a like position at Cin- 
cinnati. 



16 The St. Maky's Muse. 

With Our Teachers. Miss Busbee goes to Cornell in 

October, to study. 

Miss Balfour spent the vacation Migg Hul , a(jd Migg p Jx]ey were 

in the City of Mexico. in Rakigh during Ju , y ag members 

Miss Shipp returned home from of the Music Faculty of the A. & 

England in July, and was in Raleigh M. Summer School, 

for a few days in August. A num- Miss Trapier, '01 late instructor 

ber of articles from her pen have at St, Mary's, is delightfully located 

appeared during the summer. as instructor at Fairmount, Mon't 

Mr. and Mrs. Sanborn, Miss Ger- Eagle, near Sewanee, Tennessee, 

trude and Margaret have enjoyed where Bishop Bratton and his family 

their home in Buena Vista, among have also been spending the summer, 

the mountains of Virginia, through It is with sincere regret that we 

the holiday months. Mr. Sanborn hear of Miss Schutt's resignation, 

has been acting as Choir-master at We shall miss her, and we wish her 

Lexington. all success in her work at Winthrop, 

Mr. Stone took a six weeks trip South Carolina. She will be sue- 
in June and July in the interest of ceeded at St. Mary's by Miss Kate 
the School, trying to raise a fund for Morton Laxton of the University of 
the payment of the School debt. He Cincinnati, to whom we extend a 
had pleasant meetings with many of hearty welcome. 

the girls in their homes and on their 

visits in both North and South Caro- For ]ack of gpace in the Juue num . 

iina ' ber of The Muse, we failed to men- 
Mr. and Mrs. Jeudwiue spent the tion the short visits during the year 

month of August in Nova Scotia, of several members of the Alumnse. 

Mr. Jeud wine will continue his work Among these were Mrs. Bynum and 

as Director of Music in Miss Bris- Mary Bynum of Lincolnton ; Mrs. 

tol's school in Washington, D. C. Payne (Chip Roberts) of New York ; 

In August Miss Imogen Stone Mary Pride Jones of Hillsboro. 

made a visit to Susan Frost, at her Emmie Smedes ('84), and Henrietta 

summer home in Saluda, N. C. Smedes were at Commencement, and 

.,. ,,,, TT1 r • • afterwards made a three weeks visit 

Miss Mabel Hale, alter a visit to , . „ Tr 

. . . . _ , . , . , to their sister Mrs. Knox. 

friends in Raleigh, has returned to 

Kemper Hall, Kenosha, Wisconsin, ° 

where she will continue her work. Send the news to Ihe Muse. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



17 



OFFICIAL NOTICES. 



The Opening Exercises at St. 
Mary's. 



The Sixty-second session of St. 
Mary's School will open on Thurs- 
day, September 15. In order to fa- 
cilitate the work of classifying pu- 
pils the following program has been 
arranged for the week. Parents and 
pupils are requested to observe the 
schedule strictly : 

Tuesday, Sept. 13 — New pupils 
from the city will report at the office 
for registration and classification at 

9 A. M. 

Wednesday, Sept. 14 — Old pupils 
from the city will report at the office 
at 9 a. M. 

Thursday, Sept. 15—9 to 10:30 
A. M. — Boarding pupils will report 
at the office for registration and clas- 
sification. 

10:30 A. m. — All pupils, city and 
boarders, will meet in the Study- 
Hall in the Main Building. 

1 1 :00 A. m. — Opening service. The 
procession will form in the Study- 
Hall where faculty and pupils, have 
assembled. The order of the proces- 
sion will be — day pupils, followed 
by boarding pupils, faculty, trustees 
and the Bishop of the Diocese — to 
the Chapel. 



2:00 to 4:30 P. m.— The registra- 
tion and classification of boarding 
pupils will continue at the office. 

2:00 to 5:30 P. M.— Those pu- 
pils entering by examination aud 
those old pupils who have made up 
work in the summer and are ready 
to stand examination upon it will re- 
port to the Study-Hall for examina- 
tion. 

Friday, Sept. 16, 9:00 a. m.— 
Regular morning service in the 
Chapel. 

9:30 to 1:30 — Further registra- 
tion and classification. 

9:30 to 1:30. — Examinations as 
arranged on the preceding day, and 
announced. 

2:00 to 5:00.— Further classifica- 
tion, arranging, and examination. 

Saturday, Sept. 17 — The regular 
class-work will begin, each pupil re- 
porting to all classes as scheduled 
ready for assignment of work. 

9:10 a. M. — Regular morning ser- 
vice in the Chapel. 

9:30 to 3:30 — Regular classes and 
class-work. 



N. B. — Parents and pupils on ar- 
riving at the School are requested to 
come at once to the office in the East 
Rock House, where all pupils will 
register, and full information, with 
details, will be furnished. 



18 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



School Program. 

October, 1904. 

Thursday, Sept. 15 Opening Exer- 
cises 10 A. M. 
Saturday, Sept. 17 Informal Even- 
ing 7:30 p. m. 
Wednesday, Sept. 21 Literary So- 
cieties 7: 30 p. m. 
Saturday, Sept. 24 Social Even- 
ing 7: 30 p. m. 
Saturday, Oct. 1 Teacher's Re- 
cital 8:00 p. m. 
Saturday, Oct. 8 Public Lec- 
ture 8:00 p. M. 

o 

Student Organizations. 

Athletic: The Tennis Club. 

The Basket Ball Club. 
Literary: The Sigma Lambda Society . 

The E. A. P. Society. 
Social: The four Sororities. 

Religious: The six Chapters. 
General: The Dramatic Club. 

The Class Organizations. 



Impertinent. 

An impudent fellow in Hawarden 

Inquired, without asking his pawarden, 

Of the learned Colquhoun if the man 
in the mquhoun 

Always lodged in some nobleman's 
gawarden ? 

Whereupon the fire-eating Lord Chol- 
mondeley, 

Overhearing the words, remarked grol- 
mondeley, 

To an awe-stricken neighbor, unsheath- 
ing his neighbor, 

That the question was beastly uncol- 
mondeley. — Life. 



A Lay of Ancient Borne. 

O the Roman was a rogue, 
He erat, was you bettum, 
He ran his automobilis 
And smoked his cigarettum ; 
He wore a diamond studibus, 
An elegant cravattum, 
A maxima cum laude shirt, 
And such a stylish hattum. 

He loved the luscious hie, hate, hoc, 

And bet on games and equi ; 

At times he won — at others though 

He got it in the nequi. 

He winked quousque tandem 

At puellas on the Forum 

And sometimes even made 

Those goo-goo oeulorum. 

He frequently was seen 

At combats gladiatoral ; 

And ate enough to feed 

Ten boarders at Memorial. 

He often went on sprees, 

And said on starting homus, 

" Hie labor opus est, 

Oh where's my hie — hie domus.' ' 

Although he lived in Rome, 

Of all the arts the middle 

He was — 'xcuse the phrase — 

A horrid individ'l. 

Ah, what a different thing 

Was homo, dative homini 

Of far away B. C. 

From us of Anno Domini. 

(Harvard Lampoon.) 



The next issue of The Muse may 
be expected early in October, and 
will tell the news of the new session. 

The Editors would greatly appre- 
ciate subscriptions to the paper, and 
would ask for notes and friendly 
criticism from all its readers. 



Climate Healthy and Salubrious, 




s School, 



3ilSMj;,#a& 



{for girU and youn^Mdmen), 



[NUAL SESSION BEGINS SEPTEMBER 10, ^4; 



sess: 




TERM BEGINS JANUARY 26, 1905. 



^^ijv^-^'^IS 4 






I 









4. ra# ART SCHOOL, ; 
v 5. TEE PREPARATORY SCmcm, 




rolled 241 student 8 from 17 Dioceses. , HH^gnBnf 
Twenty- five Members in the Faculty* 



WtttFurn 



rgnssir« Music Department Much Equipment Mew, Twenty-eight 
'{J'fijieito*, v Iflteir, Chick s ring Grand ' ifVaW J'asf. Xad*2, 

^Y^feBP**?39j|!^ fa -Jhi ^t^tiiikd (J^rttiian Side of Kftucaiion 'ieithoxtt ttighi 

to the tcholattic training. *| WM^I^^^^^^^^^^^^ llfe^^Vi-* •"'■ 

For Catalogue and id^e^.i^^t^i^m^^^i^$);^^^^. ?]£ • m P^$^l&i/f££* ^»* 

& £l£^8Si -ffe^fe RE C TOM, 



©ctober 1004 



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St. /Ifoar^'e /Rmse 



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IRalefQb, ft <T. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



OPENING NUMBER. 



Vol. IX. October, 1 904. No. 3. 

St. Mary's Sixty-Third Annual which might be overwhelming if it 

Opening. were uot that some hymn or psalm, 

some prayer or benediction, leaves 

In dear old St. Mary's the yearly them a strengthening message that 

opening service always brings some becomes a promise for the coming 

solemn moments to those in posi- year. In the service of the sixty- 

tions of trust and authority there, third opening the 118th Psalm gives 

who at such a time are taking up this beautiful word of inspiration : 

again all the grave responsibilities " The Lord is my strength and my 

and all the varied opportunities of song." Not only will the Master's 

that sacred charge of young souls presence give power to endure, cour- 

that the Church has seen fit to com- age to persevere, and energy suffi- 

mit to their care. These solemu cient to the labor, but there will be 

moments come to devoted teachers real joy in working, gladness in do- 

with that touch of sadness which all iug, as the days go by, pleasure in 

times of consecration, all hours of purposing and hearts uplifted in a 

introspection, all review of the past sweet melodious expression of life, 

and anticipation of the future must The thought of tuneful praises and 

have for those who know what shad- sweet accords and pleasant sounds 

ows are cast by the passing of our rising clear and strong above all 

human years; and as they survey lesser voices and all earth's humor 

the high tide of youthful life that jarring noises, because the Master is 

is flowing all through St. Mary's himself the song, will be an oft-re- 

now, as they look and listen in the freshing thought for anxious, deeply 

throng of the fresh young faces, of responsible teachers, tempted to be 

which more than half are new and troubled over many things, inclined 

as yet unfamiliar in St. Mary's to dwell on the care and toil and 

halls, it is but natural that there the results of the service, to the 

should be a momentary shrinking forgetting of the precious privilege 

from the long task set before them, and the pure happiness there may be 

and a sudden feeling of weakness in the very fact of being allowed to 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



give any service at all. Then, for 
the buoyant spirits and the light 
hearts and the natural gaeity of 
youth is not the thought of a rejoic- 
ing, songful life especially fitted, 
lest St. Mary's budding girlhood 
should ever think that religion and 
goodness and the Master's work and 
calling might dull the pleasure of 
life's spring ! 

" Why should we fear youth's draught 
of joy 

If pure would sparkle less ? 
Why should the cup the sooner cloy 

That Christ hath deigned to bless ?" 

Thus both elder and younger, 
teachers and pupils alike, with a 
heaven - waked melody in their 
hearts, 

"May do their Father's business and 

prove their work 
The better for the sweetness of their 

song." 

E. E. Checkly. 



A Dreamer at St. Mary's. 



IN THE SCHOOL ROOM. 



She sits at her desk with an open 
book before her. The day is bright 
and sun-shiny, but not so, she ; 
her eyes are seeing so far-a-way, and 
on her lips is a dreamily mournful 
half smile. Her thoughts wander 
on from the front door of her room 
into mother's sweet room where — 
the bell ! such a harsh, jarring, ter- 
rifying, clanging bell ! 



She is pushed, crowded, elbowed, 
punched through a crowd of girls 
down a long passage-way, and finally 
reaches dry land in the shape of a 
chair under the very nose of some 
teacher. 

Her neighbor begins to recite. A 
dim realization, gradually assuming 
immense proportions, creeps into her 
mind, — she does not belong there. 
After rushing into several Senior 
and Junior classes, she finally dis- 
covers the right room, and with a 
sigh of relief opens the door just as 
her class is being dismissed. 

Back again to the school-room she 
is jostled and hustled until she does 
not know whether she is standing up 
or sitting down. After collecting 
her thoughts sufficiently to know 
that she is doing the latter, she be- 
gins to rejoice in the quiet of the 
study-hall, when with a rush all the 
home-sickness comes back to her, — 
and there are three long months be- 
fore Christmas holidays ! What did 
the girls at home do last night? 
Sister went to a ball, she knew, but 
that was for the older set. Her own 
friends, perhaps, went out rowing. 
Could she not see them now with the 
glorious moon mystically lighting up 
the little white boats and glistening 
on the wet oars as they came out of 
the water? Yes, there go Connie 
and Tom up the river where her 
boat used to meet theirs every night. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



For an instant she almost thinks she 
is with Jamie in the bateau, drift — 
that bell again ! 

From now on she has not time to 
think any more until she gratefully 
journeys 

IN THE LAND OF NOD, 

It is such a peculiar place, so quiet, 
so still, and yet with a confused 
rumble in the air overhead, and it 
all seems to come out of a big, black 
cloud, called " Where-to-go." In 
front is a forest of little trees named 
Duties, which begin to grow as soon 
as she looks at them. Looking: to 
the left end, she sees a large sign- 
board marked, " Do not take time to 
read this, but go in to your classes 
at 10:30; go to A Latin, B Science, M 
History, D English, N French and 
P German, all at the same time. 
You have not time to stop. Go on 
forever, and keep on going." 

She stands gazing at this, reading 
it over and over, until something 
catches her elbow, and shrieks, 
" What's your name?" " Where are 
you from ?" " How many brothers 
and sisters have you ?" " How old 
are you?" " When did you come?" 
" How do you like it ?" «■ How 
many lessons?" "Hard course?" 
She scarely has time to ask a breath- 
less " What ?" when a more impos- 
ing something with " Seuior" printed 
on its forehead grasps an inch of her 
sleeve, and in a stentorian squeak 



demands, " Can I do anything for 
you?" "I want to go home" is all 
the answer she can give. 

*• Well," replies the Thing-named- 
Seuior, " I never have tried, but I 
suppose I could take you there and 
back, before the next bell rings. I 
can do most anything. Come on." 

In an instant she and the Thing- 
named-Senior stand before her moth- 
er's dour. She throws open the door 
and rushes toward her mother. Mid- 
way her guide grabs her, and squeaks 
hurriedly. "Can't stop, come on." 

She is hauled on past her own 
room, past the dining-room, and 
when she gets to the parlor and is 
just about to sit down on her favorite 
divan, her guide again angrily 
shrieks, " Can't stop, come on, 
half a minute before the bell !" Back 
out of the front door they race to- 
gether, on down the street to Con- 
nie's house. She is just about to 
speak to her friend when the Thing 
named- Senior squeaks, " Come on, 
can't stop." 

On, on to the river, and somehow 
it is moon-light there. Jamie is 
waiting at the landing in the bateau 
for her, and she is just about to step 
into it, when the Thing-named Senior 
gives her sleeve a desperate twitch, 
and with a last farewell " Can't stop, 
come — ," disappears, and there is 
in the distance a faint sound of a 
bell which comes nearer, nearer, 
NEARER. S. M. J. 



gaint Mary's School Library 



4 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Among Our Sororities. 



ALPHA KAPPA PSI. 

The first Greek letter sorority at 
St. Mary's was founded in 1900, 
under the kindly, fostering auspices 
of the beloved rector at that time, 
now Bishop Bratton, of Mississippi, 
and from its Greek gnome it took 
the name of the Alpha Kappa Psi. 
By a mistake, which was corrected 
the following year, it appeared in the 
second annual of St. Mary's Muse 
under another name. After four 
years of successful development, it 
became a national fraternity in 1904, 
and established its Beta chapter in 
the Diocesan School of Virginia. 
The original charter roll of 1900 in- 
cluded three esteemed Sorores in Fac- 
ilitate, Mrs. Jeudwine, well known to 
the oldest Charlestonian families ; 
Miss Thomas, a near relative of 
Bishop Capers of South Carolina, 
and a descendant of the earliest Epis- 
copal minister of South Carolina at 
the famous old Goose Creek Church, 
and Miss Checkley, an English- 
woman of the family of the English 
Bisnop Burkilt. With such a con- 
nection in its earliest stages of evo- 
lution, it is fitting that its first chap- 
ters have been established in Church 
Diocessan Schools, and the fraternity 
remains preeminently conservative 
as to granting charters elsewhere, 
and stands unconditionally for fac- 



ulty recognition of its chapters 

wherever established as a sine qua 
non. 

GAMMA BETA SIGMA. 

The Gamma Beta Sigma Sorority 
was founded in the year 1901 at St, 
Mary's School, Raleigh, N. C, by 
Florence Jackson Thomas and Caro- 
line Mayo Brevard of Charlotte. 
N. C, Mary Henderson of Salisbury, 
N. C, Laura Clark and Anna Pars- 
ley of Wilmington, N. C, Louise 
Venable of Chapel Hill, and Ma- 
ry de Berniere Graves of New York. 

February 4, 1904, this sorority 
was granted a legal charter by the 
State of North Carolina. During 
that year Miss Lee, a member of the 
faculty, was made an honorary mem- 
ber, and three others chapters were 
organized, namely s the Beta Chap- 
ter, Edgewood School, Baltimore, 
Maryland; the Gamma Chapter, 
Columbia Institute, Tenn., and the 
Delta Chapter, Miss Stuart's, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

KAPPA DELTA. 

The Kappa Delta Fraternity, rep- 
resented at St. Mary's by the Phi 
Delta Chapter, was founded in the 
Virginia State Normal School in the 
year 1897, and in 1902 was charter- 
ed by an act of the legislature, the 
government being under control of 
the Grand Chapter. Although na- 
tionalized but two years, the growth 
of the fraternity shows chapters at 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Chatham Episcopal Institute, Vir- of the Sorority. At the opening of 
ginia ; Holliu's Institute, Virginia; 1905,Upsilou Delta consists of twelve 
Randolph-Macon, Virginia; Gun- members. It is the hope of her 
ston Institute and Fairmont Semi- members that in the future, as in 
nary, both in Washington, D. C. ; the past, the Sorority maybe pro- 
University of Alabama; and last, gressive, yet conservative; that year 
but we feel not by any means least, by year she may become more close- 
our Phi Delta Chapter at St. Mary's, ly identified with the best of St. 
which organized three years ago, and Mary's life, and may ever grow more 
merged into the Kappa Delta last fully illustrative of the highest type 
season. We of the Kappa Delta of the sisterhood among women, 
left this year to continue the good This sorority being the youngest 
work, extend greetings to our sister at St. Mary's is still unchartered, 
sororities, with the hope of standing but has received the unqualified sanc- 
together to build up a strong, help- tion of the Rector, teachers and offi- 
ful influence through sorority life cers the School. 
at St. Mary's. 



upsilon delta. I» accordance with the pledges 

It is only during recent years that S iveu b - y a11 the sororities at the first 

women have discovered and expe- S eneral sororit ? raeetin S last s P rm S> 

rienced for themselves the advan- there will be no " rushing" this 

tages of organizations binding them year, and a high code of inter-soro- 

together and enforcing upon them rity honor has been inaugurated. 

mutual loyalty and protection. The o 

girls of the sisterhoods are indeed The Women's Auxiliary and the 

fortunate in this social and spiritual s i x chapters of the Junior Auxiliary 

bond, and this rare sense of recipro- have been reorganized for the work 

cal fidelity. It is the purpose of f the new year. Miss McKimmon 

Upsilon Delta, the youngest of the an d Mrs. Iredell will supervise the 

St. Mary's Sororities, to maintain the Junior Auxiliary, and Miss Walton 

high standard of these sisterhoods. fe aga i u at the "head of the Senior 

Up«ilon Delta, founded in 1902, work. 

was officially recognized by the St. „. „ . , . - .. 

lf , ,, ... r ., , „ rin , nn Ihe first of the tall entertam- 

Mary's authorities in the fall of 1 903. .„ , o i 

T 1ftA , ,,. , r T ,. , , ments will be given on Saturday 

In 1 904 Miss McKimmon, a lady . ~ J * . a „ . / 

, £ . „ „ ', ' evening, Uct. loth, when St. i^thel- 

truly representative of all that St. , , , ' . '„ t/rrn 

ir .i . -, « , dreda s Chapter will present " Ihe 

Mary s stands tor, became a member ,. „.,,... 

Great State Jbair in miuaiture. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Our Social Life. 



Our first Saturday night at St. 
Mary's was most pleasantly spent at 
an informal reception given by the 
school. All the girls enjoyed the 
dancing and the ice cream and cake. 

On Saturday night, October 8th, 
the first social evening of the year 
was held. All the performers ac- 
quitted themselves most creditably. 

After the social evening the old 
members of the Sigma Lambda Lit- 
erary Society entertained the new 
members and the officers and honor- 
ary members of the Epsilon Alpha 
Pi Literary Society. The hall and 
Latin room of the " Far Countree" 
were tastefully decorated in ever- 
greens and golden-rod, and the cozy 
corners, rugs and curtains made us 
forget they were recitation rooms. 
The receiving party consisted of the 
officers of the society. During the 
evening dainty refreshments were 
served. The reception was very 
much enjoyed, and all were sorry to 
hear the half-past nine bell, which 
meant immediate departure. 



(From the News and Observer.) 

Teachers' Recital. 



Saturday evening, October 1, St. 
Mary's School threw open its doors 
to its friends and the public for the 
first time in the new session. The 
occasion was the annual fall faculty 



recital of the music and elocution 
departments of the school. 

The entertainment was under the 
general direction of Mr. Sanborn, 
musical director, and was participa- 
ted in by Miss Hull, violinist; Mrs. 
Sanborn and Miss Sanborn, vocal- 
ists ; Misses Dowd, Pixley and Lax- 
ton, pianists, and Miss Balfour, elo- 
tutionist. This was the first appear- 
ance of Misses Balfour and Laxton 
before a Raleigh audience, as they 
are new members of the school 
faculty. 

The numbers were all liberally 
applauded and each of the perform- 
ers obligingly responded with suita- 
ble encores. The work of each was 
so good that it would be unfair to 
make distinctions, but Miss Balfour 
in her recitations, both tragic and 
comic, and Mrs. Sanborn in her sing- 
ing, must be especially mentioned. 
Mrs. Sanborn was in fine voice, and 
her chosen selection, the " Erl Koe- 
nig" of Schubert in the German, 
suited her talent and gave her op- 
portunity to display all the great 
power of her voice. Miss Balfour 
captured her audience from the start, 
and added to the first impression by 
each encore. She is a real artist, dis- 
playing fine taste in her selections 
and much talent and training in her 
interpretation. 

Miss Hull and Miss Pixley in a 
duo. did credit to their reputation al- 
ready well established here, and Miss 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Dowd once again charmed the throng 
of friends, who are always so de- 
lighted to hear her. Miss Laxton 
played very effectively and won much 
applause. Miss Sanborn sang sweetly 
and well. 

The program of the entertainment 
was as follows : 

Sonate in G minor for piano and vio. 
Allegro Apasionata. 
Andante Grazioso. 
Allegro Molto. 

Miss Pixley, Miss Hull. 

Where'er Thou Art (Grant) 

Miss Sanborn. 
Aunt Sophronia at the Opera, 
Miss Balfour. 

Ohopin (Godard ) 

Polonaise, C sharp minor. . . . (Chopin) 
Miss Laxton. 

Erl Koenig (Schubert) 

Mrs. Sanborn. 
Hagar from the Wilderness, 
Miss Balfour. 

Fantasie Impromptu (Chopin) 

Miss Dowd. 

o 

School Notes. 

We can always count on " the 
Beebes" and the " Joneses" having 
a good time somewhere. All sum- 
mer there were rumors of matchless 
house parties and beach parties, and 
now they are all — Heloise, Minnie, 
Stuart and Sara — at the Exposition, 

Carrie Cowles, who took her cer- 
tificate in music in '03, is back with us 
this year to fill the office of Inspec- 
tor of Music practice and to continue 
her studies. 



It was tantalizing to have Annie 
Gray Nash with us for just those 
few days in September. We had 
told Nora Edmonston and "Annie 
Gray" how much alike they were, 
so they were very curious to see each 
other, and when they were together 
the fancied resemblance had vanish- 
ed ! "Annie Gray" was just from 
Hillsboro, and she visited Margaret 
Connor after leaving St. Mary's. 

Though this year's girls are hard 
at work again the " ex's" still have 
a good time with their round of visits. 
Anne Gifford, Rosalie Bernhardt 
Lily Lynah, Frances Hill, Georgette 
Holmes, and many others, we hear 
of, as flitting back and forth, enjoy- 
ing being with their friends. 

Elmer George is our latest arrival, 
and we are glad to have her back 
once more, looking so splendidly in 
spite of the dreadful accident. After 
she left Marietta, she stopped in Sal- 
isbury to visit Fan McNeely on her 
way back to St. Mary's. 

Kincy and Margaret Boylan have 
gotten back from a " delightful " 
European trip, and Josephine Boy- 
lan and Katie Barbee have returned 
from their " grand" California tour. 

And Isabel Turpin has closed her 
school days! We should all have so 
much liked to attend her "coming- 
out" ball, at her home in Centerville, 
Md., last month. 



8 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Even her comrades of last year 
were surprised to read that — 

" On Wednesday, September the 
twenty-first, at her home in Wilson, 
Gertrude Stickney was married to 
Mr. Thomas M. Howard. They 
will be at home, 116 Brambleton 
Avenue, Norfolk, "Virginia, after 
October the fifteenth." 

Her many friends at St. Mary's 

extend congratulations, and wish her 

a long and happy wedded life. 

The girls of the class of '04 are 
settling to their work. Lilly Skin- 
ner, Virgie Eldridge and Margaret 
Steadman are teaching in the Raleigh 
schools. Esther Means is taking the 
Business Course at Piatt Institute, 
Brooklyn, N. Y. From Beaufort 
come encouraging reports of Lucy 



Redwood, who 



is teaching there. 



Eliza Brown is much pleased with 
her work at Trinity, and has no less 
hours than at St. Mary. And Mar- 
jorie Hughson has given up the 
University for the present to teach 
in the Mission school at Morganton. 

Rosa Shu ford and Elizabeth Tem- 
ple are together at the University of 
Cincinnati studying in the Conserva- 
tory of Music. They write that their 
room is charming, with a " real bu- 
reau and a carpet on the floor." 

W T e are glad to hear from our 
"Pennsylvania girls" agaiu. Sara 
Jennings is still touring in the West ; 
Lucy Sweet and Nellie Frost expect 



to graduate at the Towauda High 
School this year, and is May Welles 
really going to be an actress after all ? 
She writes us that she is studying in 
the Stanhope- Wheatcroft School of 
Dramatic Art in New York, so we 
feel that she is in earnest. 

Kate Horner spent quite a large 
part of the summer trying to decide 
on just the school in Baltimore or 
Washington that she would like best. 
She enters this month Miss Stuart's 
School in Washington where a num- 
ber of our girls have been in the last 
few years. 

Josephine Knowles is at St. Tim- 
othy's, near Baltimore. Just before 
school opened, she was at The Bel- 
vedere in Baltimore, where quite a 
party of school girls had assembled, 
and spent their last days of va- 
cation in all sorts of merry-making. 

Helen Crenshaw, Catherine Fos- 
ter and Janet Siade have deserted us. 
Helen is at Converse, Catherine is 
studying music at home, and Janet 
is at a Normal School in Georgia. 



The Dancing Class has been or- 
ganized with a larger attendance 
than usual. Misses Kate and Vir- 
gilia Glazebrook, and Fannie Wil- 
liams instruct the learners this ses- 
sion while Kate Winslow presides at 
the piano. 



The St. Mary* Muse. 



Subscription, One Year, 
Single Copies, 



One Dollar. 
Fifteen Cents. 



A Magazine published monthly except in 
July and August at St. Mary's School, Ral- 
eigh, N. C, in the interest of the students and 
Alumna, under the editorial management of 
the Senior Class. ' 

Address all communications and send all 
subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



CORRESPONDENCE FROM FRIENDS SOLICITED. 



Application made at the post-office at Raleigh. 



EDITORIAL STAFF. 
Anna B. Clark Editor in Chief. 

Sa^if^Sn^^li^erary Editor, 

Ida P. Evans Social Editor. 

Bessie P. Law ) T „ , ™ Ait . n , 

Linda Tillinghast \ Local Editors. 

Rena H. Clark Exchange Editor. 

Effle C. Fairley i 

Florence Grant > Associate Editors. 

Mossie Long J 

Mary E. Rossell Business Maneger. 

Ellen P. Gibson, ) va;**-.* „„ *a„ 

Dorothy M. Hughson, J Editors on Ads. 

for admission to the mail as second-class matter. 



It is with great pleasure that we 
of The Muse staff, welcome all the 
girls, old and new, to St. Mary's. 

We hope that it will be remem- 
bered that having a monthly 
Muse is a new undertaking, and 
that it depends upon the hearty co- 
operation of the students, and of its 
friends everywhere for its support. 
We want every girl in the student- 
body to feel herself personally obliged 
to help make The Muse the voice 
of the school and a success. Any 
items of interest about the Alumna? 
and the old girls will be most thank- 
fully received. 

The new school year has begun 
very prosperously. We are sorry to 
see so manv of the old faces missing 
but are glad to greet the new ones 
who have become St. Mary's girls. 



Schedules have been straightened 
out and the girls have got to work 
in earnest, and have no more time 
for the loneliness and homesickness 
which seems to be the inevitable lot 
of every " boarding-school girl." 

May we all and The Muse have 
a very prosperous year. 

o 



IMPROVEMENTS. 

The girls wish to extend their 
hearty congratulations to Mrs. Seay 
for the many improvements in the 
appearance of our dear old St. 
Mary's. The parlor with its pretty 
new point <V esprit curtains, and new 
covers to some of the seats has not 
lost its comfortable, good-time look, 
but is a place even more pleasant 
wherein to talk and dance than form- 
erly. 



10 The St. Mary's Muse. 



And in the Library are the hand- inopportune season for us, and its 

some window-seats and art-square, blasts were holding traffic at a stand- 

and the old book-cases revarnished, still at just the time we girls were 

rearranged, and fitted up with pigeon- due in Raleigh. The new girls nat- 

holes underneath them for old pa- urally were rather more prompt 

pers, magazines, and so forth. For than the old ones, but a goodly num- 

the careful and excellent arrange- ber of both were on hand for the 

ment of the books we must thank service Thursday morning. 

Mr. Cruikshank. To the great disappointment of all 

The nasturtium vines on the In- the Cha P el was not read y for occu - 

firmary porch with their gay, bright- P aDc y> but the sim P le service in the 

colored flowers make the sick girls school-room was scarcely less im- 

feel better before they go into one of Passive. After the procession passed 

the cool wards. from the P arlor to the school-room 

Mr. DuBose read the usual short 
special service, after which Bishop 
the opening. Cheshire spoke the address of greet- 
As usual, it was with a general ing. 
air of expectancy that the girls came With the service the session was 
to assemble at old St. Mary's on the formally opened and every effort was 
15th of September. It is hard to made during the following days to 
picture changes even when we have get the work adjusted as speedily as 
heard them rumored, and one always possible. The preliminaries were 
goes back to school with a certainty finished more smoothly and rapidly 
that there is something new before than usual, and by Tuesday all was 
her. Old times pass year by year, working well. We already begin to 
New possibilities are ever at hand, forget that the session is so young. 

For two days before the opening Hazing, even in its mildest form, 
of the session the local enrollment is an unknown thing at St. Mary's, 
have been going on, and it was very but sometimes the august Seniors — 
pleasant on getting back to meet old just thirteen of them there are — are 
friends and greet the new ones, girls constrained to wish for a few practical 
about to enter upon their St. Mary's lessons in class prerogatives admin- 
training, istered to the little Freshmen. There 
It speaks well for the spirit of the are so many of these " Freshies " 
boarders that so many of them ar- this year, and some of them do have 
rived on time for the opening, for so much trouble in remembering 
the equinoctial storm arrived at an just what is due to a Senior. Why, 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



11 



sometimes they even greet us with a 
" hello," just as they would a teacher. 

The new girls are going to prove 
an awfully nice set. I wish I had 
space to tell you our impressions of 
each of them, but I'll have to wait. 

We are very glad to greet such a 
company from Wilmington — there 
are sixteen all told — and everyone 
of them nice ; and the six from Hen- 
derson will live up to their reputa- 
tions. Eula Gregory, Maria Tucker 
and Kate Garey all have had sisters 
here before them. Then Christine 
Richards is back and Minna Hamp- 
ton with her sister, Catherine. They, 
with their friend, Mamie Wilcox, 
and Serena Bailey, make up our 
Florida representatives. Elizabeth 
Wiggins brings us greetings from 
the University of the South, and 
Anne Miller's presence reminds us 
that St. Mary's girls do not forget 
even when they go as far north as 
New Jersey. 

But space forbids further notice 
for the present. We will know each 
other better later on, and give The 
Muse the benefit of our opinions. At 
present, just let me conclude by say- 
ing, we think we have made a good 
start on a happy, prosperous year, 
and we hope every girl will do her 

best to make it so. 

o 

It is with regret that we have 
heard of the death of Christine Kling- 
ensmith's father, and we wish to ex- 
tend to her our deepest sympathy. 



St. Mary's Jingle. 



Of course you yourself have heard peo- 
ple say, 

That some facts are Strange-r than 
fables, 

But Grant that you're Fairley surprised 
when you hear 

We've a Savage at one of our tables. 

Our Hardie Hunter watches o'er a 

Loane Wolf, 
Who is very good friends with A. Lamb ; 
And a " Guinea pig" too we have with 

us here, 
Who adds much to our dear " Happy 

Fam." 

If you Long for a sight of illustrious 

men, 
We have Washington, Emerson, Lee ! 
That may seem a great deal of brains 

for one school, 
But then we're Al(b)right as you Seay. 

M. R. DuB. 



The cow is in the hammock, 
The horse is on the lake, 
The dog is in the bedstead, 
But what difference does it make. 
Senior Class. 

Amo, amas, 
I love a lass, 
Amo, amat, 
She kicked me flat. 

Jr. Prep. Latin. 



Freshman — " If you wern't going 
down the street alone, I'd never have 
known you were a Senior." 

Senior — " Well, I would have 
known you were a Freshmau, any- 
where." 



12 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



The First Week of School. 



The melancholy days have come, the 
saddest of the year, 

Of wailing maids, and missing checks, 
and text-books dry and drear ; 

Heaped in the narrow passages the scat- 
tered trunks lie spread, 

And the wrapping-papers rustle wher- 
ever you may tread ; 

The picnics and the rides are gone, the 
golf-sticks put away. 

And Mr. Cruikshank makes the sched- 
ules out all through the gloomy day. 

The teachers want certificates from the 
school you were in last, 

And recall the old exam, in which you 
have not passed ; 

They talk about the courses, years, 
terms and hours required, 

And dash the soaring hopes that to en- 
trance high aspired, 

And with music and electives this truth 
they have impressed : 

The course may be expanded, but can- 
not be compressed. 

The Seniors feel the dignity their new 
position bears, 

And think 'tis reprehensible that young- 
sters put on airs, 

E'en in these early days they debate 
about the Muse 

And the " ads " they must collect, and 
the rings that they shall chose, 

And presidents and officers speedy 
meetings do not shirk, 

For societies and clubs are preparing 
for their work. 

The Juniors are elated with their senior 

year in view, 
The Freshman o'er her algebra feels a 

trifle blue 
The Sophomores endeavor to double all 

they can, 



And many a puzzled maiden the cata- 
logue doth scan, 

While the older girls are telling won- 
drous stories to the new, 

Of what they are expected in medita- 
tion-hour to do. 

And when the rules are read and con- 
flicts all arranged, 

And pianos go, and classes meet you'll 
find there's little changed, 

And when the lumps have melted, in 
the strangers' breasts that swell, 

Soon our new girls, like our old, all will 
love St. Mary's well! 

E. E. C. 



o- 



Je he ! Je ho 1 Je ho ! ho ! ho ! 
Joke ! 

What happens to students who fail 
in their English lessons ? 

They are either Shipped or Stoned. 



Check fobs are quite fashionable, 
and one St. Mary's girl wants to 
know where Parker and Davis Col- 
lege is. 






Why is Mr. Cruikshank such a 
zealous worker? 

Because he is " Ernest." 



-o- 



New Girl — " I have Shipp signed 
three times on my matriculation card. 

Old Girl—" Well, you will sail 
through." 



ALUMNAE MATTERS. 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 



St. Mnry'9 Alumnse Association. 

President, - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

(Mrs. M. T. Leak, Durham. 
Vice I Mrs. I. M. Pittenger Raleigh. 
Presidents, 1 Mrs. F. P. Tucker Raleigh. 
I Mrs. Kate deR. Meares, Wil- 
mington. 

Sec-Treas., Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 



The Chapel. 

The chief interest of the Alumnse 
still naturally centres about the 
Chapel. It was with a feeling of 
deep regret that it was found neces- 
sary to forego the usual opening ser- 
vice in the Chapel and hold it in the 
school-room, and everyone feels a 
distinct loss at the inability to wor- 
ship in the Chapel. The builder has 
met with numerous delays in his 
work on the contract, and is some 
weeks behind time. We hope to en- 
joy the Chapel privileges the more 
for the delay in having them, but it 
is a very trying wait. 

Miss McKimmon voices the senti- 
ment of the resident Alumnse in the 
following words : 

THE CHAPEL. 

The Alumnae will be glad to learn 
that the work on the Chapel is near- 
ing completion. Eleven hundred 
dollars have already been paid, be- 
sides the seven hundred dollars from 
Asheville, and it is hoped that all 
the members of the Association will 



make earnest effort to cancel the 
debt on the building. 

The organ is in place in its new 
quarters, the temporary windows and 
the benches will soon be ready. 
Those of us who are very sanguine 
hope for the " All Saints' Service" 
in the completed Chapel. 

o 

The Alumnse and the Muse. 



Before this issue of The Muse 
comes to its readers the Board of 
Editors will have reached a goodly 
number of the old St. Mary's girk 
with a letter asking their co-opera- 
tion in the work. We have the ut- 
most confidence in the result of this 
appeal, for we believe that the 
Alumnse will recognize the value of 
such a paper as The Muse hopes to 
be, and that they will be glad to do 
their part in making it a success. 
Already a number of our girls, scat- 
tered here and there, have written to 
express their liking for the new ven- 
ture and to wish it success. We 
hope that we shall receive many such 
letters. We are glad this month to 
quote the two letters which follow, 
the one from a St. Mary's girl- 
graduate who has never forgotten 
her school days here, and has ever 
been ready to show her interest in 



14 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



all that counts for the good of the 
school ; the other from a teacher re- 
membered with affection by many an 
old St. Mary's girl, who now from 
her post in another field lets us know 
that we are not forgotten. 

We are sure that the characteristic 
modesty of Miss Dowd could not 
withstand the appeal of these and 
other letters. " Mindab" and " The 
Chapel" bring old friends once more 
closer together. 

The Newoomb College, 

TULANE TjNIVERShjY, 

New Orleans, La., Sept. 28. 

Dear Editors : — I have to thank you 
so heartily for sending me a copy 
of The Muse. I find this issue capti- 
vating. You are wise thus to keep in 
touch with those who love St. Mary's, 
and I am one of those. 

Of the contents, " Mindab " and " The 
Chapel " are easily my favorites. Who 
did write that fascinating thing about 
"Mindab?" I think I could surprise 
you with my shrewdness if you gave me 
one guess. And "The Chapel" — how 
splendid of Asheville to take the 
Chancel ! When it is finished how many 
memorials it will have for us of the 
mercy of God and the devotion of good 
men and women, which will help us to 
climb to the fine heights of our human 
nature, where abides the divine ! 

With the assurance of steady interest 
and sympathy, 

Cordially, Imogen Stone. 



1321 New Hampshire Avenue, 

Washington, D. C., 
October 4, 1904. 

Dear Editors : — In enclosing my sub- 
scription to The Muse I venture the 
suggestion that articles such as "The 



Chapel" and "Mindab," in the Sep- 
tember number, would be even more 
interesting if they bore the name of 
the writer. This would be a graceful 
concession to the wishes of those far off 
from the scene of action. Could any- 
thing be more unsatisfying than a mere 
initial, which excites the imagination 
and leaves one in dark despair ? 
Sincerely yours, 

Alice Henderson. 



With the Alumnae. 



Mrs. Calvert (Mattie Thrie) vis- 
ited St. Mary's for afternoon service, 
October 2. 

Mildred Cuningham (1900) was 
with us a few days at the opening of 
school, bringing her sister, Eda, to 
enter St. Mary's, 

Sadie Root ('98) ana Annie Chesh- 
ire will attend the Triennial Conven- 
tion in Boston. 

Mrs. Robert Winston (Phronie 
Horner) spent a few hours at St. 
Mary's last week with her daughter, 
Gertrude. 

Reba Bridget's (1900) was in Ral- 
eigh a few days the last of Septem- 
ber, and visited St. Mary's. 

Bishop Brattou, after attending 
the Convention, during October, will 
be one of the presenters at the conse- 
cration of Bishop-elect Strange, at 
Wilmington, in November. We are 
looking forward to seeing him at the 
school. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



15 



Helen Srnedes is to go to New 
York in November to continue her 
study in violin. "The Twins" must 
at last be separated. How vividly 
thought of them brings to mind 
other days ! 

Her friends at St. Mary's have re- 
ceived invitations to the marriage of 
Miss Marie A. Walker ('95) of Bre- 
vard, N. C, to Mr. George Hamil- 
ton Holmes of Bowman's Bluff, 
which takes place October 19th. 

Miss Christine Busbee has gone to 
Cornell for advanced work in the 
University. Miss Jenuie Trapier is 
delighted with her new field at Fair- 
mount. Miss Thomas is teaching 
again at the G. F. C, Greenville, 
S. C. We miss them all. 

Susan Bynum has been detained 
from school by the serious illness of 
her mother and sister, who were 
stricken with typhoid fever in Ruth- 
erfordton. At this writing they are 
convalescent, and we hope for their 
speedy recovery. Mrs. Bynum (nee 
Minna Curtis) is a loyal St. Mary's 
girl of years gone by, and Mary 
Bynum was also at school at St. 
Mary's. We enjoyed a visit from 
them both last year. 

Mr. Hodgson has just finished his 
fall visit to us. We are all glad to 
greet him and sorry to see him go. 
We look upon Mr. Hodgson almost 
as a part of St. Mary's. This fall 



he begins his twenty-fourth year of 
service with us. In addition to car- 
ing for the pianos on this visit, he 
rebuilt the organ in its new location 
in the Chapel and revoiced some of 
the stops. It is the general opinion 
that it is better than ever. 

The Petersburg Dispatch has an 
interesting notice of an Art School 
established by Miss Anna M. Dun- 
lop, of that city. Miss Dunlop, after 
several years at the Art League in 
New York, studied in Paris, where 
her talent was recognized and appre- 
ciated, one of her pictures being ex- 
hibited in the French Salon. She 
also studied decorative work in Dres- 
den, and since her return to this 
country, she has done some beautiful 
work in this line which has been 
purchased by Tiffany. Her studio 
is well known in Petersburg, and 
the Art School, under her able man- 
ment, has proved a success. 

This same Miss Anna Dunlop is 
our "Jimmie" who came to St. 
Mary's a mischievous little child of 
thirteen and left after five years, as 
tall and dignified as any member of 
the faculty. She still has warm 
friends at St. Mary's who feel proud 
of her success, and The Muse sends 
hearty congratulations and best 
wishes. 

Pearl Fort came to see us for a 
little while at the opening of the fall 
term. 



16 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



School Program. 



Organizations. 



October-November, 1904. 



Oct. 15, 8:00 p. m.— St. Etheldreda's 
Chapter. "The Great State Fair in 
miniature. 

Oct. 20. The State Fair. St. Mary's 
Day. Holiday. 

Oct. 22, 7:15 p. m.— Social Evening. 

Oct. 26, 8:15 p. m.— Pupil's Recital, 
Violin and Piano. Public. 

Oct. 29, 8:15 p. m — Public Illustrated 
Lecture. Prof. Collier Cobb on "The 
Fossil Reefs of Wyoming." 

Oct. 31, 8:00 p. m— Hallo'een Carni- 
val. 

Nov. 1, All Saints. Founder's Day. 
Holiday. Annual Memorial Service and 
Sermon, 10:30 a. m. 

Nov. 5. Tau Delta German. 



SENIOR CLASS. 

President Margaret DuBose. 

Vice-President Dorothy Hughson. 

Secretary Anna Clark. 

Treasurer Mossie Long. 

Historian Sadie Jenkins. 

JUNIOR CLASS. 

President — ■ • 

Vice-President ,Bettie Woolf. 

Secretary Amy Fitz-Simons. 

Treasurer Ruth Foster. 

SOPHOMORE class. 

President ■ 

Vice-President Emily Carrison. 

Secretary Grace Whi taker. 

Treasurer 

ERESHMAN CLASS. 

President 

Vice-President Helen Strange. 

Secretary Alice Davis. 

Treasurer Emma Barnwell. 



German Clubs. 



Literary Societies. 



L ETOILE. 

President , , . .Senah Critz. 

Vice-President Alice Spruill. 

Leader Mary Ella Moore. 

Secretary Mary Rossell. 

Treasurer Anna Clark. 

TAU DELTA. 

President Jennie Murchison. 

Vice-President Ellen Gibson. 

Leader Virgilia Glazebrook. 

Secretary Mary Robinson. 

Treasurer Marguerite Springs. 

Altar Guild. 

President Sadie Jenkins. 

Vice-President Linda Tillinghast. 

Treasurer Margaret DuBose. 



EPSILON ALPHA PI. 

President Rena Clark. 

Vice-President Bettie Woolf. 

Secretary Elmer George. 

Cor. Secretary Mossie Long, 

Treasurer Gertrude Sullivan. 

Critic Minna Hampton. 

Tellers Isabel Ruff, Annie Sloan, 

Historian Mary Slocomb. 

SIGMA LAMBDA. 

President Mary Rossell. 

Vice-President Jennie Murchison. 

Secretary Anna Clark, 

Cor. Secretary Margaret DuBose, 

Treasurer Sadie Jenkins, 

Critic Dorothy Hughson • 

Tellers. . .Senah Critz, Grace Whi taker. 

Historian Ida Evans. 



jzr ADVERTISEMENTS. s& 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss not ours. 



North Carolina's Leading 
Dry Goods Store 

DOBBIN & FERRALL, 

122 and 125 Fayetteville St., (at Tucker's Store). 

Perfectly equipped mail order service. 
Correspondence solicited. 

We prepay postage, express or freight charge 
anywhere in North Carolina on all cash mail 
orders amounting to $5.00 or more. 

DOBBIN & FERRALL. 



-4* X 

;STBD.I858.^ tJP 



'^AHLERS! 



JEWELERS. 
(AIjEIGH, N.C. 



BOYLAN, PEARCE & CO., 

Dry Goods, Millinery, 
Tailored Costumes . 
Gloves, Hosiery, . 
Handkerchiefs, . . 
Underwear, . . . 
Fancy Goods. . . 



Mail orders filled intelligently and promptly. 



FAYETTEVILLE AND SALISBURY STREETS, 

Raleigh, N. C. 



Send to 

ALFRED WILLIAMS & CO., 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



BOOKS . . 
of all kinds. 

Select line of . 
STATIONERY. 

Eastman's Kodaks 
and supplies. . . 

Office supplies. 



Have .. 
AVHARTON 
To make your 
PHOTOGRAPHS. 

Remember it PAYS 
to get the BEST. . 



HART- WARD HARDWARE CO., 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Best of everything in Hardware. 
Satisfaction guaranteed or money refunded 
All-Right Cook Stoves. Celebrated Warm Air 

Heaters, the only perfect heater made. Write 

for prices. 



& 



EVERYTHING IN 
DRY GOODS. . . . 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Advertisements, 



Don't forget to buy your Shoes of 

POOLE & ALLEN'S Shoe Store. 


ANTICEPHALALGINE cures quickly and 
safely Headache in all its forms. 


Reserve this Space for 

KING'S DRUG STORE. 


JOLLY & WYNNE JEWELRY 00. 

Wedding and Holiday presents. 
Fine Watch and Jewelry repairing, 


You'll finp up-to-date Shoes at 

HUNTER BROS & BREWER. 


CROWELL'S . . 
DRUG STORE. 

120 Fayetteville Street. 


ELLINGTONS ART STORE, 

Ruleigh, N. 0. 
Everything In art. 
Embroidery, materials, Wools and Zephyrs. 


For the most satisfactory work, 

Try RIGSBEE at 

Watson & Co.'s Gallery. PHOTOGRAPHS. 


Private. Dinsng and Banquet Halls at 

GIERSCH'S, 216 Fayetteville St. 


T. W. BLAKE, 

Rich Jewelry and Silverware. 
Repairing promptly done. 


THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS, Raleigh, N. C. 

Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful service 
and value. 


PERRY & ROSENTHAL, Trust Bldg. 
Ladies' Fine Shoes. 


DARNELL & THOMAS, 
Pianos and Organs. 
Sheet music and small goods. 

RALEIGH, N C. 


Buy ROYSTER'S Fine Candies. 

Fine Sporting Goods. 


Good things always at 

BRETSCH'S BAKERY. 


Remember DUGHI. 


De. V. E. TURNER, 

Dentist. 



Location Central for the Carolinas. 

Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 

St. Mary's School, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

{for girls and young women). 
63d ANNUAL SESSION BEGAN SEPTEMBER 15, 1904. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGINS JANUARY 26, 1905. 



1. THE COLLEGE. 

. 2. THE MUSIC SCHOOL. 
St. Mary 1 s 

offers instruction in these\ 3. THE B USINESS SCHOOL 
Departments: , 4 Tff£ , ARrp 8CH00L , 

5. THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL. 

In 1903-4 were enrolled 241 students from 17 Dioceses. 

Twenty-five Members in the Faculty. 

Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New. Twenty-eight 
Pianos. New Chickering Grand Piano Just Added, 

Special attention to the Social and Christian Side of Education without slight 
to the scholastic training. 

For Catalogue and other information address 

Rev. McNeely DuBose, B. S., B. D., 

RECTOR. 



November t904 



#& 




fti/liiiii;^tt6e 



Glfr 



TRaleiob, "M. C. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

HALLOWE'EN NUMBER. 



Vol. IX. 



November, 1904. 



No. 4. 



Founders' Day. 

Of all the days which have a 
special significance for St. Mary's, 
none has a deeper meaning or calls 
forth a truer sense of thankfulness 
than the great festival of All Saints. 
St. Mary's is justly proud of her 
past, and her workers in the present 
never lose sight of the great debt 
they owe to those of former days, 
but it is on the first of November, 
set apart by Bishop Bratton when 
Rector, as the fitting time for special 
remembrance of the saints who have 
lived and labored for the school, as 
well as the general saints of the 
Church, that St. Marv's turns back 
for a moment to the days of her past, 
and lives with those who have lived 
and labored so faithfully for her; 
and the force of those lives lift her 
out of the present to a sense of higher 
and better things, and she feels an 
inspiration that abides long after the 
day itself is gone. 

The Founder's Day of 1904 is 
especially memorable as the occasion 
of the first Communion Service in 
the enlarged Chapel. It is marked 
too by a tinge of regret, for the be- 



loved Rector was not able to be 
present, and while his place in the 
services was very acceptably taken 
by the Rev. A. B. Hunter, Rector 
of St. Augustine's School, every one 
was keenly conscious of his absence, 
and many a prayer was wafted up 
for his complete recovery and speedy 
return to his own. 

The Chapel, effectively dressed in 
autumn leaves by the Altar Guild, 
had all of its old charm with much 
added beauty. The service was im- 
pressive and entirely iu keeping with 
the spirit of the day. The beautiful 
" For all the saints who from their 
labors rest," so often heard on simi- 
lar occasions in the old Chapel, was 
sung as heartily and inspiringly in 
the new. Mr. Hunter's address 
struck the key-note of the occasion. 
In beautiful language he directed 
attention to the saints of the ages — 
of long ago, of the close past and of 
the present — and the debt due to 
them, and showed how the Church 
had recognized this obligation by 
appointing a day sacred to their 
memory. The founder of the School, 
and his successors in the Rectorship ; 
the noble band of women who from 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



the start had supported the Rector's to spare no efforts in sending a rep 
hands, and done such wonders for resentative from everywhere. Alice 



r 



the daughters of St. Mary's ; those the Duchess and the little White 
daughters themselves, who had so Rabbit, came from Wonderland; 
constantly influenced the lives of Mother Goose, with a real live goose, 
their fellows by their lives and ex- traveled here directly from Child- 
amples — all were very near, and hood and Nursery Days ; two Pan- 
seemed to live again in the memory sies, fresh from the Garden of Mem- 
of their strength and usefulness. ory, grew up in a single night; a 

o stately Raven, donning a scarlet cos- 

Halloween. tume for this festive occasion, flew 

from " Night's Plutonian Shore." 

The annual Halloween party is A Bear-keeper and his clumsy Bruin 
always one of the chief events of the were theadmiration of Buster Brown, 
year at St. Mary's, but never have while an Italian Organ-grinder and 
the ghosts and goblins and spirits of his frisky Monkey frightened terri- 
Halloween exerted themselves so bly the little Pickaninnies, and kept 
successfully as on October the thirty- poor old Aunt Dinah in constant 
first nineteen hundred and four. At anxiety over her children's behavior, 
half past seven o'clock the girls in A Policeman succeeded in main- 
fancy costumes assembled in the hall taining excellent order, and preven- 
of the Main Building for the grand ted the Red Cross Nurses from hav- 
parade into the parlor. The proces- ing any work to do. Fairies, Nuns, 
sion which was formed through the Flower-girls, Ghosts, Witches and 
management of a Red Devil, was representatives of all times and places 
headed by a very elaborately dressed completed the procession. After the 
bridal party — minister, bridesmaids grand march the Sybilline Books, 
and groomsmen, and a very com- telling the strange doings of the girls 
posed bride and groom. Directly in the past, rather than their deeds 
following this was a negro bridal of the future, were read by the 
party just as complete and as appro- black- veiled Prophetess, 
priately dressed. Dutch girls, In- Next followed a meeting of the 
dian maidens, Ballet dancers, Jap- Executive Committee of the Fac- 
anese girls, Colonial dames, Irish ulty of St. Mary's of 1925. (If only 
girls and dark-haired Spaniards the Faculty of to-day would consid- 
added much to the picturesqueness er some of the propositions made by 
of the parade. The spirits seemed this ideal committee! They really 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



must have done so, for we are going 
to be allowed to go to the game of 
foot-ball Saturday and to see the cir- 
cus parade Friday.) After the most 
tantalizing plans for the entertain- 
ment of the girls had been formed, 
the committee adjourned, and the 
appearance of the Red Raven in 
Senior Hall, was described, the only 
explanation of his presence being that 
as his ghastly brother appeared to 
Poe when he sorrowed for his lost 
Lenore, so the Red Raven has come 
expressive of our grief for the de- 
parted Eleanor (Miss Thomas). 
Then the midway was opened, and 
the various booths were the chief at- 
traction. The Queen of Hearts 
gave out the " Bokes of Fate," a 
Gypsy read the palms, the Three 
Fates foretold the future, Pythia 
distributed the fortunes, and Blind 
Chance guided in the choice of 
wealth, industry and marriage. In 
Mathematics Lane the guests assem- 
bled to play the old Euglish Hallo- 
we'en games, which were led by a 
witch. Another witch, with the omni- 
present Black Cat, guarded the en- 
trance of French Allee into which 
the girls went one by one, to see what 
future fate the magic mirror would 
reflect. 

The ringing of the ten o'clock 
bell broke the enchantment which 
the spirits of Halloween had cast 
over St. Mary's, and called us back 
into the real world. All the dis- 



guises are laid aside, and the real 
St. Mary's girls wish to thank the 
faculty, and especially Miss Check- 
ley, for a most delightful journey 
into the realm of the mysterious. 

A. B. C. 



Laura's Conversion. 



" Im just crazy about Halloween," 
cried dark-eyed Anita, as she glanced 
at the reflection of her bright red 
dress and bracelets and large jewels 
of all descriptions. 

" Silly !" came in muffled tones 
from beneath the leaves of a large 
Latin dictionary, which with six or 
seven other Latin books, almost 
completely hid the serious face of 
Laura, Anita's practical room-mate. 
" You know it's foolish, the way 
you girls do. You've spent all your 
money and missed all your lessons 
for the last week getting that cos- 
tume ready." 

But by this time Anita's head was 
buried deep in her trunks, where she 
was trying to root out her old red 
bed-room slippers. There was a 
long silence, during which Laura 
studied her Latin, and Anita — her 
mirror. 

Anita finally broke the quiet with 
" Do dress up, Laura, it's lots more 
fun." Then there ensued a long 
argument between the two friends, 
and when the ringing of the bell in- 
terrupted it, Anita had succeeded 



The St. Mary^s Muse; 



only in making Laura promise to 
go to the parlor for the Grand Pa- 
rade, at any rate. 

The Parade was over, and all the 
variously costumed girls were sit- 
ting in groups on the parlor floor 
waiting anxiously for the apples. 
And, strange to say, Laura was still 
in the parlor, and she was in one of 
those same groups. Yet how could 
she be, for the girls were doing 
a very "silly" thing, waiting for 
the apples, for you must know that 
on Halloween each apple must have 
an initial on it, and the right initial 
always goes to the right girl, and 
so she finds out what her lover's 
name is to begin with. The apples 
came. " What's your initial, Lau- 
ra," Anita called. " Oh, I forgot 
to look," Laura answered absent- 
mindedly ; she had been wondering 
how she could get over to her room 
to study. She stopped thinking 
about that, though, as soon as she 
looked at her apple, for it certainly 
was funny, but there was an " M." 
just as big as life cut in it, and she 
knew she had never mentioned Man- 
ning to any of the girls. But, of 
course, she just happened to get 
that "M." 

" What's the matter, Laura ? 
Your face is as red as fire ?" Then 
follows a chorus of " Look at Laura 
blush." " I'm not blushing," Laura 
answered impatiently, and in her 
most dignified manner. 



" I don't want to go over there," 
as they all rose to go to the first 
booth. But, somehow, she went, 
and when she opened her " Book of 
Fate" and looked at the picture of 
her future lover, " Crazy," was the 
only remark she made ; but way 
down in her heart she knew that 
those eyes and dark hair were so 
much like Manniog's. 

Soon she found herself at the "Al- 
tar of Prophesies," and it was almost 
with excitement that she unfolded 
her slip of paper, and it was cer- 
tainly with excitement that she ut- 
tered an amazed " Oh !" when she 
had finished reading it, for was there 
not written, in blackest ink, these 
momentous words — " A city's streets 
will see you walking, with charita- 
ble bearing, beside one who is now 
an earnest theologue?" Her first 
startled thought was, " How, under 
the sun, could they have known 
that Manning was studying theology 
at Sewanee?" 

In a dazed state of mind she fol- 
lowed her party to the " Three 
Fates," of whom she tremulously 
asked those mystic questions — 
"Who?" "When?" and "Whith- 
er?" and received the answers re- 
spectively, " A man," " As soon as 
you can," " To a heathen land." 

" Humph ! I don't think there is 
anything in that, anyhow," she 
said, with an incredulous toss of her 
head, for, of course, Anita must not 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



know that she even thought of at- 
taching any meaning to these things. 
However, when a little later, Anita 
caught her room-mate thoughtfully 
counting her apple seeds, she knew 
that Laura's conversion was com- 
plete. S. M. J. 



Alpha Kappa Psi Hallowe'en 
Party. 



Perhaps the most original enter- 
tainment ever given at St. Mary's 
was that of Miss Checkley to her 
fellow-members of the Alpha Kappa 
Psi Sorority on Hallowe'en night. 
From beginning to end the true 
Hallowe'en spirit reigned supreme 
in time and place and circumstance. 
An invitation, written in red ink 
and sealed in a nutshell, asked the 
Sorority to assemble in the Library 
about the ghostly hour of midnight. 
The Library was dimly lighted by 
candles and a pumpkin head, and 
the long table, in the middle of the 
room, was covered with dark red 
crepe paper, the entire color scheme 
being carried out in black and red, 
the Hallowe'en colors. Figures of 
black cats, scattered about the table, 
helped to make the appearance 
ghastly and weird. 

The menu given below was on 



cards which were decorated with 

pictures of witches and pumpkins. 

A ppetite. 

Loving Cup. 
P unch. 

H allowe'en Cake. 

A lmonds (not salted.) 

K isses. 
A pples. 
P ulls. 
Pie. 

A pple-seed Jelly. 

Pie. 

S. 
I. 

The pie was a big red and black 
one, with black ribbons extending 
from it to each place, and these rib- 
bons on being pulled brought out 
very quaint Hallowe'en souvenirs. 
Of course, the Hallowe'en cake con- 
tained the prophetic ring, bodkin and 
button, and penny. The seeds in 
the apple- seed jelly were eagerly 
counted, each girl pretending that 
she did not really know what num- 
ber she ought to have, and the ap- 
ples, in which were hidden the 
names of future fates, were just as 
carefully opened. The almonds (not 
salted) were almoud shells in which 
were sealed tiny rings and hearts 
appropriate to Hallowe'en. For- 
tunes were told with cards, burning 
alcohol, the magic ring, and float- 
ing names, and toasts were drunk to 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



the welfare of all of St. Mary's, 
and the pleasantest social meeting 
the Sorority has ever had was over. 

A. B. C. 

■ o 

A School Girl's Idea of Me- 
dievalism. 



I had just finished reading Ivan- 
hoe, and was, of course, enchanted 
with it. Yes, truly enchanted, for 
I fell asleep and dreamed I was a 
Saxon maiden in those glorious old 
days. 

The hall in which I seemed to be 
was like the one so charmingly de- 
scribed by Scott, and I lost sight of 
all the bareness and discomfort in 
my delight in the romantic air of 
mystery and grandeur that envel- 
oped everything. 

How sorry I was wheu I waked 
up and found myself living in this 
uninteresting, matter-of-fact age. 
At least, so it seemed to me then ! 
But after I thought it over for 
awhile I came to the conclusion that 
I would not be willing to give up 
all of our present advantages. For 
instance, I forgot how small and in- 
significant a part of that world were 
girls and their affairs ; and how im- 
possible would have been our pleas- 
ant school days here at St. Mary's 
with all their joys and sorrows. 

Going back to my dream of a 
visit (if you will allow the slangy 



meaning as well as the real) to 
' Merrie England," I thought of 
the subject which always appeals to 
us school girls — the things they had 
to eat. Even if they were not very 
dainty, I do not think that any one 
in those days ever complained of 
being hungry, which I am afraid we 
do — sometimes. The dinner was 
considered quite an important event 
(as "ice-cream night" with us), and 
sometimes lasted three hours. The 
numerous attendants who waited 
on the table would make us green 
with envy on that same ice-cream 
night. Then, too, those people did 
not have to worry over the differ- 
ence between knives and forks — and 
accordingly get lectures, and have 
to support green pigs — for they used 
much less expensive and more use- 
ful articles. 

The knights and nobles were just 
as picturesque, and objects just as 
much for us to be " crazy about," 
and " wild and distracted over" as 
Scott's Ivanhoe and King Richard, 
except, perhaps, they were some- 
what fierce, and considered the wo- 
men as very inferior creatures, only 
made for their amusement. But these 
same women could hunt and handle 
a bow and arrow, whose size would 
put to shame the muscle acquired by 
all our physical culture, "stretch, 
2—3—4, reach, 2—3—4," and all 
that. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



One thing that I know the dor- 
mitory girls would have envied 
them was the beds, such sumptuous, 
silky, delicious, great big couches! 
Just imagine Rowena's horror if she 
had been forced to sleep in one of 
our narrow beds ! Yet, you know 
school would not be half so much 
fun, if we did not have something 
to complain of. 

They had some very attractive 
amusements in those days, such as 
plays ; but that word play brings to 
our minds " Dolly Varden," and 
as we could not go to see that, 
let's pass over it quickly as pos- 
sible, and go on to the tourna- 
ments. These were every bit as 
exciting and interesting, and even 
more so, than any baseball or foot- 
ball game of ours. The tourna- 
ments were something like the races 
at our Fair. 

But just at that moment when 
I was comparing them with the 
Fair, I waked up with a delightful 
thought — we are going to the Fair 



Florence Kidder, Sue Prince and 
Helen Strange entertained their 
friends most delightfully November 
2nd in the French Room. The table 
was very tastefully set, the prevail- 
ing colors being pink and green, and 
covers were laid for fifty. Elabor- 
ate refreshments were served. 

On her birthday, October 22, 
Mary Robinson entertained about 
forty of her friends in the French 
Room. The refreshments were ice- 
cream and cake, candy and fruit. 

Fair week was made specially en- 
joyable for Katie Loane, Jesse Har- 
ris, Mary Marriott and Annie Wells 
by visits from their parents. 

Emily Carrison and Mary Ville- 
pigue entertained their friend, Alice 
Corbett, of Camden, the early part 
of this month. 



THE TAU DELTA GERMAN. 



to-morrow ! 



E. P. G. 



Our Social Life. 



Several of the girls have paid lit- 
tle visits to their homes lately. Car- 
rie Claytor, Cora Hunt, Gertrude 
Winston and Maria Webb, have 
each been away for a day or two. 
Beatrice Cohen spent Halloween in 
Goldsboro. 



All had been looking forward to 
November 5th, the night set for the 
Tau Delta German, and I think 
(this time) there was more in reali- 
zation than in anticipation. The 
parlor and French Room were 
charmingly decorated in autumn 
leaves, with yellow the prevailing 
color. Virgilia Glazebrook led most 
gracefully many pretty and intri- 
cate figures. Everybody was pleased 
and surprised with the dainty favors. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Punch was served in the parlor and 
a delicious supper in the French 
Room. Blandina Springs, Helen 
Strange, Elizabeth Wiggins and 
Catharine Thomson, dressed to rep- 
resent yellow chrysanthemums, acted 
as waiters. 

The following were present r 

V. Glazebrook and Miss Elise Emer- 
son. 

K. Glazebrook and Miss Amy Fitz- 
Simons. 

M. Slocomb and Miss Mary Ella 
Moore. 

D. Slocum and Miss Emma Drewry. 
J. Murchison and Miss Gertrude Sul- 
livan. 

J. Boylan and Miss Margaret DuBose. 
S. Bynum and Miss Mary Rossell. 
F. Williams and Miss Eda Cunning- 
ham. 
M. Walker and Miss Helen Clark. 

E. Barnwell and Miss Anna Clark. 
S. Prince and Miss Rena Clark. 
M. Robinson and Miss Senah Critz. 

E. Gibson and Miss Kate Winslow. 

F. Kidder and Miss Mattie Hunter. 
I. Evans and Miss Nora Edmondston. 
M. Villepigue and Miss Jean Carson. 
M. Springs and Miss Grace Whitaker. 
E. Croft and Miss Jane Green. 

G. Winston and Miss Alice Spruill. 
B. Woolf and Miss Isabel Ruff. 

B. Albright and Miss Jessie Harris. 
M. Stedman and Miss Hull. 

Stags— F. Grant and M. Short. 



-0- 



OUR TRIP TO THE FAIR. 



As the seventeenth of last month, 
the long anticipated date, drew near, 
we St. Mary's girls began to feel ex- 
cited and rather demoralized at the 



idea of a two days' holiday and a 
Thursday spent at the Fair. The 
first part of the week we gazed from 
afar at the parades that passed by 
the Grove, and the Marshals gorge- 
ous in their regalias, and by Thurs- 
day were quite ready to become our- 
selves a part of the Fair. 

Everybody went — some of us bra- 
ving the crowded street-ears, literally 
hanging on the ends, some going 
afoot, but all, in one way or anoth- 
er — and we finally found ourselves 
inside the gates, pushed along with 
the crowd toward the Pike, almost 
before we could catch our breath. 

There everything was as usual — 
the " Speelers," deafening our ears 
with their clamor, and inviting us 
through their megaphones to come 
see the " Child Wonder of the 
South," etc. ; the photographers, 
thrusting their ridiculous tin-types 
into our faces ; the venders of the 
"come-back balls," blocking our way, 
to sell us their wares; the palmists, 
enticing us into their tents with 
promises of a beautiful future (who 
could resist that !); and all the other 
familiar fakirs attendant upon every 
fair. 

As we struggled and elbowed our 
way up the Pike rubber balls flew 
fast and furious, often stinging as 
they hit, and if we dared frown the 
familiar and hated cry would sound 
forth, " Nobody gets mad but old 
maids and." At this, the disparag- 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



ing remarks we had started to hurl 
after the sender of the ball were im- 
mediately hushed, and we were com- 
pelled to smile — till the next time. 

How we hung about the " Spin- 
nin' Jinny, " fascinated by the 
squeaky piano and prancing horses — 
coming back after each trip up the 
Pike for one more ride ! 

The day wore on, and we occa- 
sionally strolled among the exhibits 
in the buildings, but something al- 
ways drew us back to the Midway, 
with its ever moving, jolly crowd, 
that buffeted and shoved us from 
side to side, but which we liked de- 
spite it all and regardless of the heat 
and dust. 

Those of us who are lovers of 
horses tried vainly to see the races, 
but our only reward would be the 
glimpse of jockey's cap, or the sound 
of a horse's hoofs on the track, and 
we would turn away from the fence 
and back again to the crowd that 
filled our mouths full of confetti if 
we dared laugh, and pounded us 
with balls and whips if we failed to 
look gay. 

We saw all the Fat Boys, Little 
Horses, Educated Pigs, etc., to be 
seen ; rode on all the different Ferris 
WheeTs and Ocean Waves to be rid- 
den on ; and at last, late in the after- 
noon, turned homeward, tired and 
worn out possibly, but with our 
hands full of balls, whips and tin- 
types, which, strung around our 



rooms, remind us daily of the Great 
State Fair of 1904, and all its fun. 

Caro Gray. 



St. Etheldreda's Fair. 

St. Etheldreda's Fair, which is 
held every year, was a great success 
both socially and financially. 

All the booths were unusually at- 
tractive, but the Country Store seem- 
ed to have the greatest number of 
customers. There, for ten cents, 
you had a chance to get anything 
from a hand-mirror to a bottle of 

olives. 

In the Fortune-teller's tent, the 
pretty Gypsy made air castles seem 
substantial realities. 

It was hard to even see the raffling 
wheel, for all took the chance of 
getting a box of candy, and every- 
one got something there. 

Many a stitch was saved by buy- 
ing Christmas presents at the fancy 

work booth. 

Another attraction was the side- 
show, where Miss Balfour recited, 
in her usual charming way, and the 
" Reveries of a Bachelor" was given 
in pantomine. 

What seemed to give more pleas- 
ure was the throwing of confetti. 
Was this because it was the only 
means by which we had a chance to 
" get even" for those long lessons, 
those numerous rules, and many 
other sore grievances. B. W. 

heard after the fair. 
Did you go up on the grand stand? 
Mary A.— No, but that's the only 
side-show I didn't see. 



10 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



School Notes. 



Susan Bynum has come back to 
school, and we are glad that her 
mother and sister are so much better. 

It is very good to have Mrs. Du- 
Bose and the children back again 
after their trip to South Carolina, 
and we hope to have the Bishop and 
his family with us again soon. Their 
house has been closed since before 
the Convention, and we miss them. 

How the South Carolina girls did 
" root " for their football team in its 
annual contest on the 5th, and how 
very quietly they did it. Both 
teams did nobly, and there were no 
hard feelings left, even though the 
A. & M. colors did decorate the 
summer-house. 

A large party of the girls, with 
Mr. Stone, saw John Griffith in 
Macbeth" on the 10th, and an- 
other party attended the Artists' 
Recital of Mde. Maconda, soprano, 
and Miss Nichols, violiniste, at B. 
U. W. with Miss Hull, on the 11th. 
Both were much pleased. 

We are sorry that on account of 
the health of her mother, Elmer 
George has had to go home to New 
Berne for an indefinite stay. Maria 
Tucker, too, has left us to try to get 
well and strong enough to take up 
her duties again after Christmas. 
We hope to see them both back be- 
fore long. 



a 



Prof. Collier Cobb, of the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina, lectured 
here Saturday night, October 29th ? 
on " The Fossil Reefs of Wyom- 
ing." His talk, which was very in- 
teresting, was illustrated by stereop- 
ticon views. It is a pleasure to 
know that he will be with us again 
on November 19th, and give his il- 
lustrated lecture on "The Sand 
Reefs of the Carolina Coast," to 
which all the friends of St. Mary's 
are invited. 

The " Parker wave " at St. Ma- 
ry's reached its height on the day 
before election. We didn't have any 
" trouble at the polls," nor did the 
"duels" or "torchlight parades" 
develop, but there was plenty of 
talk. On the morning of the 9th 
the ten champions of President 
Roosevelt were happy, at any rate. 
And already we have forgotten again 
that there is such a thing as parti- 
zanship and politics, and are simply 
Americans. 

Weddings will call us away. 
Jane Iredell Green attended her sis- 
ter's wedding, in Wilmington, on 
the 8th. Mr. Cruikshank went to 
Maryland on the 25th to the mar- 
riage of a cousin, who has since 
sailed with her husband to take up 
their work with Bishop Kinsolving 
in the mission field of Brazil. St. 
Mary's has an interest in her, too, 
for her mother, Lucy Walke, was a 
St. Mary's girl during all the war 
days with the first Dr. Smedes, and 
was a school-mate of " Miss Katie" 
and Miss Walton, and of Susan By- 
num's mother. 



The St. Mary* Muse. 



Subscription, One Year, 
Single Copies, 



One Dollar. 
Fifteen Cents. 



A Magazine published monthly except in 
July and August at St. Mary's School, .Ral- 
eigh, N. O.j in the interest of the students and 
Alumnse, under the editorial management of 
the Senior Class. 

Address all communications and send all 
subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSK, 

KALEIGH, N. C. 



CORRESPONDENCE FROM FRIENDS SOLICITED. 



EDITORIAL STAFF 
Anna B.Clark Editor in Chief. 

Margaret DuBose !t*„„ ™j-. 

Sadie M. Jenkins J Literary Editors. 

Ida P. Evans Social Editor. 

Bessie P. Law ) T , _... 

Linda Tillinghast j Local Editors. 

Rena H. Clark Exchange Editor. 

Effie C. Fairley ) 

Florence Grant [-Associate Editors. 

Mossie Long J 

Mary E. Rossell— —Business Maneger. 

Ellen P. Gibson, J nvu^,.., ~„ «^„ 

Dorothy M. Hughson, \ Editors on Ads. 

for admission to the mail as second-class matter. 

We sent copies of the October 
Muse to several schools with which 
would like to exchange publications. 
Others have been unwittingly left 
out. We shall be very glad to re- 
ceive and make exchanges. It is 
our desire to be on terms of friendly 
intimacy with our fellow schools and 
colleges, and we hope to hear from 
more of them. 

We are exceedingly sorry that Mr. 
DuBose's ill-health necessitated his 
leaving St. Mary's for a month's 
rest. He is with his brother in Co- 
lumbia, S. C, but we hope to have 
him back with us by the middle of 
November, well and strong. The 
affairs of the school have gone very 
smoothly in his absence, but all of 
us, teachers and pupils, miss him 
very, very much. 



Application made at the post-office at Raleigh, 



EDITORIALS. 

The Board of Editors of the Muse 
feel very much gratified at the inter- 
est which the friends of St. Mary's 
have shown in their effort to make 
the Muse a success. Numerous 
subscriptions have come from former 
pupils of the school, and many let- 
ters which encourage us to persevere 
more earnestly in our work. It is 
rather disappointing that more of the 
students here do not show their in- 
terest, but we hope that after the paper 
has firmly established itself they will 
be more appreciative. Yet now, when 
the editing of a monthly magazine 
is a new undertaking, the co-opera- 
tion of the student body is needed to 
ensure success, and would be espec- 
ially gratifying. 



12 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



We all owe Miss Checkley a very 
large debt of gratitude for the de- 
lightful Halloween entertainment. 
We always feel sure when Miss 
Checkley sets out to do anything 
that there is something good com- 
ing. She put all her energy into 
making this a success, while the girls 
helped her faithfully, and the enter- 
tainment was entirely worthy of her. 

The end of the first quarter of the 
school year is reached on November 
16. The year is flying as rapidly as 
time always does, and we hope that 
we are all rendering good accounts 
of ourselves. We trust that neither 
we nor those at home will be disap- 
pointed when the reports are read. 

We are very glad to be able to ac- 
knowledge the following subscriptions 
received since the last issue of the pa- 
per, and to express our thanks here in 
place of more formal acknowledgement : 
Mrs. Clem Dowd, Jr., Nancy Benedict, 
Elba Cotten, Kitty Coleman, Josephine 
Knowles, Elizabeth Massey, Annie Nor- 
fleet, Mrs. J. F. Tyre (Addie Gaylord), 
Cantey Venable, Leize Weaver, Geor- 
gia Wilkins, Mrs. Jeudwine, Louise 
Urquhart, Miss Eebecca Hill, Mary 
Hunter, Mrs. T. W. Howard (Gertrude 
Stickney), Mrs. T. W. Bickett (Fannie 
Yarboro) , Eleanor Vass, Louise T. Bus- 
bee, Virginia Bailey, Harriet Webster, 
Mrs. Alex. Cooper, Pattie Gee, Mary 
Philips, Mary Ruth Thomas, Annie G. 
Root, Tallulah Gregg and Elsie Gudger. 

Miss Lee has our deep sympathy 
in the serious illness of her brother, 
and Miss Fenner, who was called to 



her home in Baltimore, iu the death 
her father, which occurred in Balti- 
more on the 9th. 



A RUNNING COMMENT ON THE 
MONTH AT ST. MARY'S. 

The second month of the new ses- 
sion has been a strenuous one for 
the girls of St. Mary's. The life 
is always full, but at this season it 
is especially so on account of the 
great interest in both duties and 
pleasures that crowd upon us. We 
are allowed a month in which to 
adapt ourselves, and are then ex- 
pected to have settled down to solid 
work, but it is not easy wher one's 
mind will run to foot-ball, and the 
Fair and Halloween, and what not. 

Just after the appearance of the 
October Muse, on the 15th, Mr. 
DuBose and Mrs. DuBose and the 
younger boys started before we were 
up for Columbia. There Mr. DuBose 
has been resting up since, while Mrs. 
DuBose, after visits to Union and 
Columbia, came back to St. Mary's. 

On the evening of the 15th the 
first of the annual Chapter entertain- 
ments was given, when the girls of 
St. Etheldreda had their usual rep- 
resentation of the Great State Fair. 
The preparations for the evening 
were extensive, and the amusements 
thoroughly enjoyed by a large crowd. 
An excess of confetti throwing was 
the one disagreeable feature. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



13 



" Fair week" is always a bad one 
for study, but this year there was less 
interruption than usual. There was 
school on Monday in order to leave 
Wednesday a free day in which the 
girls could see their friends and get 
ready for Thursday, and then on 
Thursday about eighty of us had a 
jolly afternqou at the Fair. All en- 
joyed it, even the behavior on the 
Pike, which was too boisterous to be 
pleasant. 

On the evening of Oct. 29th Prof. 
Cobb, of the Chair of Geology at the 
University, who is an old friend of 
St. Mary's, came to deliver the first 
public lecture of the year's course. 
The views were fine, and everyone 
enjoyed the talk. 

All day long Oct. 31, her helpers 
were busy assisting Miss Checkley 
in getting ready for the Halloween 
Carnival. Parlor, School Room and 
French Room were transformed as 
if by magic. Everyone entered 
heartily into the spirit of the occa- 
sion, and the evening was a great 
success. 

Next day, All Saints, is one of the 
great days at St. Mary's. It was 
both a pleasure and a privilege to 
have Mr. Hunter take charge of the 
services. The enlarged Chapel was 
thrown open for the first time, and 
the Communion Service was sweet 
and deeply impressive. Mr. Hun- 
ter delivered a most excellent and 
appropriate sermon. 



Two days of rest and work, and 
then the ; ' Circus came to town." 
Not that the circus directly affects us, 
for the nearest the girls get to it is 
to see the " grand procession" as it 
passes ; but it was very tantalizing 
to have the whole thing right next 
door on Cameron Field, and not be 
able to go. 

Foot-ball has been under the ban 
with us this year, but the authorities 
were gracious when it came to the 
game between A. and M. and South 
Carolina College on the 5th. Our 
sympathies were divided, but all 
were as much interested as if they 
understood the intricacies of the 
game. The drawn battle suited 
neither, and yet both. 

Rain kept the circus over a day, 
so it was with the din of it in their 
ears and while the girls at the foot- 
ball game, obedient to their instruc- 
tions, were rending the air with 
their enthusiastic silence, that the 
Tau Delta leaders were preparing 
for their German in the evening. 

On the night of the 10th, Mr. 
Stone, assisted, chaperoned a large 
party to the Opera House to see 
"Macbeth." This was the first 
theatre party of the year. They are 
very limited this year, and this 
was a part of our education. It 
might have been better, but we en- 
joyed it thoroughly. 

The next evening Miss Hull, as- 
sisted, chaperoned another party to 
the Baptist University to the Artists' 
Recital there. Not the same indi- 
viduals, O no ! You don't know 
St. Mary's if you think that. Two 
such diversions in a week would 
never do. The concert was good 
and the girls were much pleased. 



14 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



So the month has passed. The 
daily life which means so much 
more to each of us needs no chron- 
icling. As I read over this I fear 
that some may think we have had 
rather an excess of diversion, and*I 
expect we have had enough. If 
you want to destroy any idea that 
we have too much just come and be 
a St. Mary's girl. 



Pupils' Recital. 



The first recital of the year by 
the music pupils of St. Mary's was 
given October 27th. All the selec- 
tions of the following program were 
most creditably rendered : 

1. Sonata, for Three Violins. . . .Bella 

Allegro Moderato. 
Adagietto. 
Allegro. 
Minna Hampton, Margaret DuBose, 
Christine Richards. 

2. Cavatina Reinecke 

Frank Wilson Proctor. 

3. Shepherd and Shepherdess, for 

Piano Godard 

Mary Lassiter. 

4. Waltz, from Faust Wichtl 

Robert William Proctor. 
6. (a) The Thrush. 

(b) Love is a 'straying ever since 
Maying, 
From Suite, " O'er Hill and 

Dale," for Piano Nevin 

Sadie Marcelline Jenkins. 

6. Bolero Bohm 

Margaret Rosalie DuBose. 

7. The Flatterer, for Piano, 
Chaminade 

Kate Leigh Winslow. 



8. (a) Slumber Song Schumann 

(b) Mazurka Mlynarski 

Gertrude Elaine Sanborn. 

9. Impromptu C sharp minor, for 

Piano Reinhold 

Mattie Caroline Hunter. 
o 

We were all very much interested 
in the consecration of Bishop-elect 
Strange as Coadjutor to Bishop Wat- 
son of East Carolina, in Wilming- 
ton on All Saints' Day. Four of our 
Wilmington girls, Helen Strange, 
the new Bishop's daughter, Florence 
Kidder, Marguerite Short and Sue 
Prince went to Wilmington for the 
occasion. 

We are much disappointed that 
Bishop Bratton was unable to get in 
his visit to St. Mary's on his return 
from the General Convention. We 
had looked very hopefully for his 
coming, but we know how busy he 
is, and that he would not fail to come 
to see us if he could find the oppor- 
tunity. It was very nice that he 
was able to be with Mr. DuBose, 
in Columbia, on his way to Bishop 
Strange's consecration. 

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'pBoo: jCpua.irtf s<9us 9j3uiC siqx 

'iiuao euo iisnC oq jbjpP B JQSbm tj,i mo^i 

•Avoqs b jo qiq ^SB9j oqq s%&3 9qs ij 

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'tjiS B saiMOM ^Bqq 3uiqq£uw s,9J9q:* ji 



ALUMNAE MATTERS. 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 



St. KI«ry'S Alumnae Association. 

President, - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

f Mrs. M. T. Leak, Durham. 
Vice J Mrs. I. M. Pittenger Raleigh. 
Presidents, 1 Mrs. F. P. Tucker Raleigh. 
I Mrs. Kate deR. Meares, Wil- 
mington. 

Sec-Treas., Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 



The Chapel. 

At length the Chapel is ready for 
use again. Though the contractor 
has not entirely finished the interior 
work and turned the building over 
to the school, the chancel was suffi- 
ciently complete on All Saints' Day 
to permit the service to be held. 
The regular daily services were re- 
snmed on the 8th. 

The hardwood finish adds deci- 
dedly to the chancel. A temporary 
window of cathedral glass is in place 
over the altar, and will look very 
well there until the ladies of Ashe- 
ville are ready to put in the perma- 
manent one. The building has been 
wired for electric lights, but gas will 
be used at present for lighting. The 
steam heat gives satisfactory service. 
The new carpet is down, and the 
old furnishings which will serve as 
as a link between the old and the 
new, are back in their places. When 
the new pews for the transepts ar- 
rive, we shall have as nice a little 
chapel as any one would wish for, 



with accommodations for at least 
four hundred. 

It is a source of gratification to 
have the actual work of the im- 
provement completed. The greater 
task of finishing payment for the 
work is yet before us of the Alum- 
nae. Let us all together rejoice that 
so much has been accomplished, and 
bend every effort to even greater 
things in the future. 

o 

With the Alumnae. 



Josephine Bowen and Minnie Bur- 
gwyn attended the germans at the 
Weldon Fair. 

We hear that Octavia Hughes is 
expected in Raleigh at an early date. 
Her St. Mary's friends wait to greet 
her. 

We hear delighted and delight- 
ful accounts from Miss McVea, of 
the University of Cincinnati, and 
her work in it. She has our best 
wishes always. 

Miss Florence Slater has returned 
from a delightful stay in Europe to 
resume her lectures in the Flushing 
Schools. After five years' absence 
the marks of Miss Slater are still 
plainly visible in the Science De- 
partment at St. Mary's. 



16 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Mrs. M. M. Nash and Mrs. We are sorry to have to announce 

Knowles (Mary Ellis), and Mrs. Geo. the death of Mrs. Mildred Cameron 
Butler (Eva Lee), were among the Shepherd, of Hillsboro. She died 
visitors last month. suddenly at the residence of her 

Susie Battle, who took her cer brother, Col. Benehau Cameron on 
tificate in Piano at St. Mary's last Thursday, October 27th. She was a 
May, has joined Miss Schutt in the "St. Mary's girl," and during her 

music faculty of Winthrop College, school life lived with her aunts in 
S. C. the old Cameron home, opposite St. 

During the last few weeks invita- Mar 7' s , where she died. Those who 
tions here have been received to the knew her wel] m those earlier days 

marriages of several of our old girls. cherisn a tender gratitude for nu- 

In November Sallie London is to merous kindnesses received at her 

be married to Mr. J. S. Fell, of haDds - 

Trenton, N. J. j Rosa Battle to We still receive many nice letters 

Dr. Robert Miller, of Goldsboro ; from the alumnge about The Muse. 

Grayson Willingham to Mr. George And the Jeudwines are as dear to 

Peschau, of Wilmington. Addie us as alumnse. It did us a great 

Gaylord was married October 5th to deal of good to have Mrs. Jeudwine 

Mr. J. F. Tyre, of Gaylord. write from their home in Washing- 

During Fair week many old girls ton : " Mr ; Jeudwine and I are de- 
visited their Alma Mater, and were % hted with the copies of The 
pleased with the many improve- Mu8E - It is very pleasant to think 
ments at St. Mary's. Among them we sha11 have the news of St. Mary's 
were Mrs. Alex. Cooper (Ella Fau- evei 7 month - Wishing you all suc- 
cett), a frequent and always most cess - 

welcome visitor, Mary Lee Erwin, And such sentiments as the fol- 

Mrs. Marriott (Emily Pippin), Can- lowing, coming to us j n a Jetter 

tey Venable, Priscilla Dodson, Lucy from Lewiston : " My mother and 

Tayloe, Mildred Edmunds, Gretchen two sisters, who are also St Mary's 

Barnes, Nancy Benedict, Myrtle girls, were delighted with the Oeto- 

Disoway, and Mrs. H. H. McLen- ber number of The Muse, and we 

don (Margie Lockhart.) have no idea of missing the other 

Georgette Holmes has our sincere numbers. We are always delighted 

sympathy in the death of her father, to have aa Y news of St - Mary's." We 

who passed away at his home in thank Miss Louise Urquhart for her 

Charleston, on October 31. letter, and hope for others like it. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



17 



" Mindab " has a successor. Mies 
Jones and Miss Fenner stand spon- 
sors for black and white " Bum," 
who is spending most of his kitten- 
hood in the neighborhood of the 
Teachers' Sitting-room. 

In the death of Miss Eleanor 
Clement, on October 1, one of the 
earliest of the daughters of St. 
Mary's, passed to rest. Madame 
Clement, Miss Clement's mother, 
accompanied Dr. Smedes when he 
came to Raleigh to establish St. 
Mary's, and remained in charge of 
the French department at the school 
for some years. Her daughter was 
educated at St. Mary's and in France, 
and later was a teacher here. They 
went to Pennsylvania and estab- 
lished a well-known school at Ger- 
mantown, and it was there that Miss 
Clement died. 



the next issue to print a little Christ- 
mas poem from the same work : 

MOTHER LOVE. 



A Poet of St. Mary's. 

We are glad to be privileged to 
print in The Muse the following 
little poem from the advauce sheets 
of a book of poems entitled, " The 
Palace of the Heart and Other 
Poems of Love," by an old St. 
Mary's girl, Miss Pattie Gee, now 
of New York. The poems will be 
issued as a holiday book by the 
publishing house of Richard S. 
Badger, of Boston. We purpose in 



(a lullaby.) 

Sleep, baby, sleep! 
The sun to kiss the mighty sea stoops 

low, 
And o'er the world the weird shadows 
blow 

So deep ; 
But Mother's love sinks lower than the 

shadows, 
And sweepeth broader than the ocean's 
billows ; 

Sleep, baby, sleep ! 

Sleep, baby, sleep ! 
Life lies in mortal grief, where sorrows 

throng 
And press upon the heart go strangely 
long, 

So deep; 
But Mother's love is longer than life's 

sorrow, 
A love o'erleaping each unseen to- 
morrow ; 

Sleep, baby, sleep! 

Sleep, baby, sleep ! 
Around thy rest a holier love doth flow, 
More tender than the mother-love can 
know, 

More deep ! 
And He who all the babies' curls num- 
bers, 
Will fold thee close when tired earth- 
love slumbers ; 

Sleep, baby, sleep ! 

Pattie Williams Gbb. 

We extend our congratulations to 
Miss Gee on these poems, aud hope 
she will favor us with others. 



18 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



School Program. 



(November-December. ) 



Nov. 17, 8:15 p. m. Second Public 
Pupils' Recital. 

Nov. 19, 8:15 p. m. Public Illustra- 
ted Lecture. Prof. Cobb, of the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina, on "The 
Sand Reefs of the Carolina Coast." 

Nov. 24. Thanksgiving Day. Holi- 
day. 

Nov. 23, 8:15 p. m. St. Catherine's 
Chapter. Scenes from Dickens, etc. 

Nov. 26, 7:00 p. m. "Social Evening." 

Dec. 3, 8:15 p.m. St. Anne's Chap- 
ter Entertainment. 

Dec. 10, 8:15 p. m. L'Etoile German. 

Dec. 15, 8:15 p. m. Third Public Pu- 
pils' Recital. 

St. Mary's A B C'S. 



A stands for Anna, our Senior so bright ; 
B, Betsey, with letters from morning 
till night 

C is Christine with her violin dear: 
D, Dorothy's guitar, which we all love 
to hear. 

E is for Ellen, " Great Getter of Ads.": 
F stands for Fannie and Fiction and 

Fads. 
G is for Gertrude and also for Gym: 
H stands for Harriet, and sometimes 

for "Him." 

I is for Ida, the voice of her floor: 
J is for Jennie with energy for four. 

K stands for Kyser, a " naterel musi- 



cian 



>>. 



L is for Linda, '05's last addition. 

M is for Mamie, the " Muse Business 
Man," 



N stands for Nancy, who " thinks cous- 
ins grand." 

is for Ohla, who didn't come back. 
P is for Pearl, and Permissions — alack I 
Qis Quocumque, of Roman descent ; 
R stands for Rena, a real president. 

S is for Susie, who draws "like a dream" 
To us a real Gilbert or Gibson, I ween. 

TJ's the unknown, who'll be joining us 

soon: 
V, Virgilia, could easily dance to the 

moon. 

W, X, Y, Z come too late in the race, 
It's really a pity they can't have a 
place. 



M. R. DuB. 



-o- 



At St. Mary's. 



(With apologies to Mark Twain.) 

A pink trip slip from the sickroom there , 
Sign, teacher, sign with care, 
Sign for the pupil, plain and fair. 

A buff trip slip for permissions rare — 
Sign, O teacher, sign with care, 
Sign as an answer to the pupil's 
prayer. 

A white trip slip for the schedule's 

share, 
Sign, O teacher, sign with care, 
Sign for the hours that you will not 

spare. 

Some scrap trip slip for the library fair, 
Sign, O teacher, sign with care, 
Just one lone book for a class to share. 

* 

Not one trip slip for a play, I declare, 
Come, now teacher, sign it fair, 
We'd enjoy it so if we once went 
there. 
(From the " Sibylline Books.") 



J2? ADVERTISEMENT*. & 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss not ours. 



North Carolina's Leading 
Dry Goods Store 

DOBBIN & FERRALL, 

122 and 125 Fayetteville St., (at Tucker's Store).- 

Perfectly equipped mail order service. 
Correspondence solicited. 

We prepay postage, express or freight charge 
anywhere in North Carolina on all cash mail 
orders amounting to $5.00 or more. 

DOBBIN & FERRALL. 



.A 

ESTBD.iSSe.'^' Sj!> 

^ahler'sSons\ 

JEWELERS,/ 

RAbEIGH, N.C./ 



BOYLAN, PEARCE & CO., 



Dry Goods, Millinery, 
Tailored Costumes 
Gloves, Hosiery, . 
Handkerchiefs, . . 
Underwear, . . . 
Fancy Goods. . . 



Mail orders filled intelligently and promptly. 



FAYETTEVILLE AND SALISBURY STREETS, 

Raleigh, N. C. 



Send to 
ALFRED WILLIAMS & CO., 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



BOOKS . . 
of all kinds. 

Select line of . 
STATIONERY. 

Eastman's Kodaks 
and supplies. . . 

Office supplies. 



Have 
WHARTON 

To make your 
PHOTOGRAPHS. 

Remember it PAYS 
to get the BEST. . 



HART- WARD HARDWARE CO., 

RALEIGH, N. C. 
Best of everything in Hardware. 
Satisfaction guaranteed or money refunded 
All-Right Cook Stoves : Celebrated Warm Air 

Heaters, the only perfect heater made. Write 

for prices. 



Or 



EVERYTHING IN 
DRY GOODS. . . . 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Advertisements. 



W. C. STRONACH'S 

SONS CO., 
. . Grocers. . . 
215 Fayetteville Street. 

KING'S GROCERY, 

" The Little Store.,' 



FOR QUICK COOKING 

Nothing exceeds the 

Gas Range. 

Always ready. . 
No dirt or ashes. 



TOU LIGHT, 

Use the Best: The Welsbach Light. 



STAND AED GAS ELECTRIC CO., 
124 Fayetteville Street. 

JKO. P. HAYES. Photographer, 

Kodak work of all kinds. 

Don't forget to buy your Shoes of 

POOLE & ALLEN'S Shoe Store. 

KING'S UP-TO-DATE DRUG STORE 

AND SODA FOUNTAIN. 

Cor. Fayetteville and Hargett Sts. 



You'll finp up-to-date Shoes at 

HUNTER BROS & BREWER. 



ELLINGTONS ART STORE, 

Raleigh, N. O. 
Everything In art. 
Embroidery, materials, Wools and Zephyrs. 



Private,?Dinsng and Banquet Halls at 

GIERSCH'S, 216 Fayetteville St. 

THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS, Raleigh, N. C. 

Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful service 
and value. 

DARNELL & THOMAS, 
Pianos and Organs. 
Sheet music and small goods. 

RALEIGH, N C. 

Remember DUGHI. 



M. ROSENTHAL 8c CO., 
Groceis, 

136 FAYETTEVILLE STREET. 



Good things always at 

BRETSCH'S BAKERY. 

Buy ROYSTER'S Fine Candies. 
Fine Sporting Goods. 

SINGER SEWING MACHINE, 

130 Fayetteville Street. 

SALVERTORE DESIO, 

Mfg. Jeweler and Silversmith, 

1012 F. St., N. W., 

Washington, D. C. 

On application will send any article selected. 
To St. Mary's, discount of ten per cent. 

THE J. D. RIGGAN COMPANY. 

Holiday Goods. 

WEATHERS & UTLEY, 

Art Dealers. 

MISSES REESE & CO., 

Millinery. 

CALIFORNIA FRUIT STORE, 

Fruit and Confections. 

ANTICEPHALALGINE cures quickly and 
safely Headache in all its forms. 

JOLLY & WYNNE JEWELRY CO. 

Wedding and Holiday presents. 
Fine Watch and Jewelry repairing, 

CROWELL'S . . 
DRUG STORE. 

120 Fayetteville Street. 

For the most satisfactory work, 
Try RIGSBEE at 

Watson & Co.'s Gallery. PHOTOGRAPHS. 

T. W. BLAKE, 

Rich Jewelry and Silverware. 
Repairing promptly done. 

PERRY & ROSENTHAL, Trust Bldg. 

Ladies' Fine Shoes. 

Dr. V. E. TURNER, 
Dentist. 



Central 



Climate Healthy and Salubrious 

St. Mary's School, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

{for girls and young women) 



Q'Sb ANNUAL SESSION BEGAN SEPTEMBER 15. 1904. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGINS JANUARY 26, L905. 



/ 1. THE COLLEGE. 
2. TUB MUSIC SCHOOL. 



St. Mary's 

l fffen instruction in thesel 3 - THE BUS' I NESS SCHOOL. 

t>eparments: j 4 _ THE ^J^T SCHOOL. 

5. THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL. 



In 1903-4 were enrolicd 241 students from 17 DioceFes. 

WM Twenty- five Member-: in the Faculty. 



Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New. Twenty-eight 
Pianos, Neu Chickering Grand Piano Just Added, 

Special attention to the Social and Chritt'n v Side of Education without slight 

to the scholastic training. b^?%*£'$ 

For Catalogue and otlicr information addrex* 

Ret). MeNeely DuBose, B. SI, B. D., 

3&2$§P S&^K^SS '■'-.• %d RECTOR. 



December, 1904 




Is 

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IRaleiob, 1R C. 






The St. Mary's Muse. 



CHRISTMAS NUMBER. 



Vol. IX. 



December, 1904. 



No. 5. 



A Little Christmas Prayer. 



Sweet, heavenly Babe, Creator mild, 
Lying in love on Mary's breast, 

Immaculate and undefiled ; 

O'er whom God's angels sang and 
smiled, 

Grant me the pure heart of a child, 
The calm all blest of sin confessed, 

Sweet, heavenly Babe, Creator mild, 
Lying in love on Mary's breast! 

Pattie Williams Gee. 



Christmas Customs and Super- 
stitions. 



It was Thomas Tusser, who, 
nearly four centuries ago, wrote to 
all people advising them at Christ- 
mas to " play, and make good cheer, 
for Christmas comes but once a year." 

But it was centuries even before 
the institution of our Christian cele- 
bration that the custom of a mid- 
winter festival origiuated amoug the 
Pagau nations, and from them we 
have transferred many of the fea- 
tures of our own great festival. The 
Germans had their "Twelve Nights," 
the Romans their Saturnalia, and 
the Scandinavians some midwinter 
celebration. The worship of the sun 
was the center of these idolatrous 



rites. His arrival at the winter sol- 
stice was the crisis in the conflict of 
natural forces. Up to that time the 
God of Winter was Victor, but his 
reign was ending when Phoebus 
Apollo reversed his fiery steeds for 
the return journey. In due time 
the Scandinavian Thor aided Freiga, 
the Goddess of Spring, to break up 
the ice and snow and clothe nature 
again with life and beauty. 

When the Christian religion was 
adopted by Constantine it became a 
great political problem how to turn 
the people from their religious — so- 
cial customs into sympathy with the 
true religion, for the Pagan mid- 
winter festivities had a charm hard 
to break. So the time for them was 
accepted by the Church, and the 
birth of Christ — the Son of Right- 
eousness — was the central event of 
the joyous celebration by those who 
had been in the habit of observing 
the Pagan holidays. 

Christmas Day iu the Primitive 
Church was observed as the Sabbath 
Day, and like that was preceded by 
a vigil, from whence arose our 
Christmas Eve. 

It was the custom among our an- 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



cestors (and one still practiced in 
many parts of England) to turn 
night into day by lighting huge can- 
dles and Yule-logs. These proba- 
bly had some religious symbolism, 
and were doubtless typical of Christ, 
the Light of all lights, who came 
into the world, as it was supposed, at 
this time. The Yule-log and Yule- 
candles of our English ancestors 
were borrowed from the Scandina- 
vians, for the feast of Jul was al- 
ways celebrated with huge bonfires. 

Through all time the singing of 
Christmas carols, the ringing of 
bells, eating and drinking, and 
dancing have entered largely into 
our Christmas festivities, and in 
England these extend from Christ- 
mas Eve to Twelfth Day. One of 
the most serious offences that could 
be committed at this time was to be 
grave or wise. 

Among the superstitions associa- 
ted with Christmas is one which 
represents that during this holy sea- 
son the Powers of Darkness are so 
prostrate as to be unable to harm 
anyone. The cocks crow all night 
long and their vigils scare away all 
malignant spirits. Shakespeare re- 
fers to this when he makes Marcel- 
lus, in Hamlet, utter the following 
lines : 

" Some say that ever 'gainst that sea- 
son comes, 

Wherein our Saviour's birth is cele- 
brated, 



This bird of dawning singeth all night 

long; 
And then, they say, no spirit stirs 

abroad : 
The nights are wholesome; then no 

planet strikes; 
No fairy takes, nor witch hath power to 

charm, 
So hallowed and so gracious is the 

time." A. B. 0. 



Thanksgiving Day. 

The manner in which Thanks- 
giving Day began for us at St. 
Mary's was enough to make us 
grateful, had we not been so before; 
for we had our first early commun- 
ion service in the enlarged Chapel. 
The altar had on each side corn- 
stalks, so tall that they reached al- 
most from the floor to the chancel 
window, and there were sheaves of 
wheat on both sides of the cross. 
We have in the new Chapel the 
same altar that was in the old, and 
it, with its familiar Thanksgiving 
decorations, held many sweet associ- 
ations for the old girls, and made us 
think of former beautiful services of 
praise rendered on this feast day be- 
fore this altar. 

After breakfast, "Miss Katie," Miss 
Walton, Mrs. Sanborn, and some of 
the altar-guild girls added oranges, 
potatoes, celery and bananas, which 
Mrs. Seay sent over, to the corn and 
wheat. The oranges were all put on 
the altar, and pyramids of the other 
fruits were made at either side of the 



The St. Marys Muse. 



altar-rail gate, and at the foot of the 
lectern. 

The mid-day service was hearty 
throughout, and as we marched out 
of the Chapel singing — 

"Our fathers' God, to Thee," 
we found something else to be grate- 
ful for — the happy condition ot our 
country. 

Thus was the first part of Thanks- 
giving Day spent, and it left us with 
so much thankfulness in our hearts 
that we had, as our rector wished, 
•"a holy day, as well as a holiday." 

S. M. J. 



[Written for the Senior S. S. Class.] 

An Advent Thought, 

" Unto us a child is bom. . . . and 
of His peace there shall be no end." 

Isaiah IX., 6, 7. 

Unto us l< a child is given," 
Love-sent from Heaven, 
A gift divine, 
And to our hearts, 
That gift imparts, 
Comfort benign ! 

Now for us the Godhead gleams 

Thro' infant dreams, 

In cradle bed, 

And sanctifies 

Our weakling cries, 

In pain or dread ! 

And by that Heaven-given child, 

Babe undented, 

We courage take ! 

That babe's weak clasp 

For our slight grasp 

Our plea doth make ! 



For children we, all infantine, 
Yet Light Divine 
May us in-dwell ! 
Like babes unknowing, 
Thro' us flowing 
God's grace may swell ! 

The Holy Babe stretched helpless 

In Earth's alarms, [arms, 

With childish fear ; 

So we may plead, 

In utter need, 

"Oh! Father, hear! " 

For faltering steps, for stumbling 
For falls to-day, [way, 

And stam'ring prayer, 
In that Child's name, 
We, too, may claim 
A Father's care ! 

And infants on a Father's breast, 

Our want confessed, 

With Christ we'd lie. 

And softly hear, 

Above our fear, 

Heaven's lullaby ! 

And since our God to us has sent 

This sweet content, 

For weak child-hearts, 

May we give then, 

Good gifts to men, 

As God imparts ! 

All children we, and children they, 

Who now to-day 

Receive God's Child ! 

And by that token 

Our harshness broken 

Be we love-mild ! — E. E.G. 



Our Social Life. 



SENIOR RECEPTION. 

Saturday afternoon, November 19, 
the Class of 1905 was entertained 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



for the first time as the Senior Class 
by Miss DuBose at the Rectory. 
Little booklets, tied with the class 
colors, were distributed among the 
girls, each of whom was to write 
a poem about the particular picture 
in her book. Miss Anna Clark's 
poem won the prize. On her card 
was drawn a picture of two bottles 
of beer, and she wrote the following 
toast to the Class: 

Here's to. the Class of naughty-fiver 

May she ever be sincere ; 
I pledge her health and drink her down 

With these bottles of Blue Ribbon 
Beer. 

It's quite a temptation 

To have this libation 
Gaze at me so plainly from here, 

I know you'll ne'e'r think it, 
But I'll have to admit it, 

That I often drink— 

" Blue Ribbon Beer." 

The Seniors have had a great deal 
of trouble about their rings, so, after 
the poems were written, a large pie 
was brought in with a ribbon at- 
tached for each Senior, and each 
pulled out a stick of candy with a 
ring on it. We thought this a de- 
lightful and original idea. 

Delicious refreshments were then 
served. We hope if the Class is 
fortunate enough to be entertained 
again, the entertainment will come 
up to Miss DuBose's, for it is im- 
possible to have it surpassed. 

— E. 



St. Catherine's Chapter. 



On Wednesday evening, Novem- 
ber 23, St. Catherine's Chapter, con- 
sisting of the Class of 1905, charm- 
ingly entertained a large and appre- 
ciative audience with the annual 
chapter entertainment, the second of 
the year's series. The Seniors pre- 
sented some " Scenes from Dickens," 
and the little comedy " Six to One." 
The plot of the comedietta shows 
the dilemma of one poor boy who 
makes love to six pretty cousins in 
rapid succession, finally discovering 
his " one true love." The actresses 
all deserve great credit, though Miss 
Dorothy Ilughson, who, as the hero, 
amused the crowd by her quick and 
witty by-play, was especially good. 
The whole entertainment was well 
done, and spoke volumes for the en- 
ergy of Miss Florence Grant, Presi- 
dent of the Chapter, and her fellow 
members, and the able direction of 
Miss Margaret Jones, the Chapter 
Directress. 

The evening was a success finan- 
cially as well as socially. The in- 
troduction of " box-parties" was an 
innovation, which was much enjoyed. 
Miss Genevieve Cooper entertained 
her guests at a " luncheon " after the 
" play." Her guests were — 

I. M. Ruff with Miss Spruill. (Chap- 
erones.) 
J. Harris with Miss Perry. 



The St. Mary's Mcse. 



M. Hunter with Miss Boy Ian. 

A. Lamb with Miss Davis. 

G. Cooper with Miss Winston. 

Misses Bessie Gray and Nancy 
Pearson also gave a box- party to 
the following guests : 

C. Klingensmith with Miss Gray. 

N. Pearson with Miss Carter. 

F. Williams with Miss Glazebrook. 

The program was as follows : 
Part I. 
"Dialogues from Dickens." 
1. Popping the Question. 

Mrs. Corney Sadie Jenkins 

Mr. Bumble Mary Rossell 

2. Practical Education. 

Mr. Squeers Dorothy Hnghson 

Mrs. Squeers Anna Clark 

Nicholas Nickleby Effie Fairley 

School Boys. 
3. A Romantic Adventure. 

Mr. Nickleby Florence Grant. 

Middle-aged Lady Rena Clark 

4. The Proposal. 

Mrs. Nickleby Ida Evans 

Kate (herdaughter).-LindaTillinghast 

Stranger Mossie Long 

Head Margaret DuBose 

Part II. 

"Six to One." 

(A comedietta in one act.) 

Scene: Newport. 

Mrs. Dodge Margaret DuBose 

Gladys (the Boston Niece) .. Anna Clark 
Nina (theN. Y. Niece) ..Florence Grant 

Ethel (the N. C. Niece) Ellen Gibson 

Maud (the Phila. Niece) .Sadie Jenkins 
Aline (the French Niece) .. .Bessie Law 
Elliot (the nephew) .Dorothy Hughson 

—A. W. S. 



feasts given on or about Thanksgiv- 
ing Day. Ever so many of the girls 
got boxes, and invited their friends 
to share the good things sent from 
home. One of the most formal feasts 
was what we called " the mystery 
party" its character being kept se- 
cret even from those invited until 
they were once within the much- 
used French room. It is needless 
to say that all the entertainments 
were greatly enjoyed. 



Epsilon Alpha Pi Reception. 



Thanksgiving Feasts. 
It would be almost impossible to 
give an account of the numerous 



On Saturday evening, November 
26, the members of the Epsilon Al- 
pha Pi Literary Society gave a re- 
ception complimentary to the new 
members. The French Room was 
particularly attractive with its deco- 
rations of evergreens and flowers, 
and the soft light of the Japanese 
lanterns. Rena Clark, Minna 
Hampton, Gertrude Sullivan and 
Christine Richards were the receiv- 
ing party. 

Besides the members of the Epsi- 
lon Alpha Pi Society, the faculty 
and the officers of the Sigma Lambda 
Society were present. 

Delicious punch, wine jelly, with 
whipped cream, served in orange 
peel, and nabisco wafers, were the 
refreshments. The entertainment was 
greatly enjoyed by all. 

H. I. W. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



St. Anne's Chapel. 



Saturday evening, December 3rd, 
St. Anne's Chapter (Miss Sutton's 
Dormitory), for the third of the 
Chapter entertainments, presented a 
scene from the " Bird's Xmas Carol" 
and the " Floradora Drill." Both 
were splendid. 

In 1902 and again in 1903 this 
Chapter presented " Mrs. Wiggs " 
with great success, and this year sus- 
tained its reputation in a like 
scene. Virginia Kyser as " Mrs. 
Ruggles," Alice Stack as "Sarah 
Maud," and Beatrice Cohen as "Peo- 
ria" could not have been better. 
The other characters were good also. 

The drill was in the nature of a 
novelty at St. Mary's, and was excel- 
lently done and well received. All 
were grace itself, the girls looking 
so pretty in their much beruffled 
pink dresses and big picture hats, 
and the " boys," just as well as boys, 
can look. 

The program : 

The Ruggles Family. 

Mrs. Ruggles Virginia Kyser 

Sarak Maud Alice Stack 

Peoria Beatrice Cohen 

Susan Frankie Self 

Kitty Mary Marriott 

Peter Loula Joyner 

Cornelius Lily Savage 

Clement Cora Hunt 

Eily Frances Lee 

Baby Larry Rainsford DuBose 



Floradoka Drill. 

Alice Calluni, Pattie Barden, 

Alice Davis, Emma Barnwell,. 

Nellie Durham, Ella Croft, 

Kate Glazebrook, Elise Emerson, 

Fannie Williams, Lottie Sharp. 



Pupils' Recital. 



The second public recital, by the 
pupils of St. Mary's, was given 
on Thursday, December 8th. It is 
needless to say how creditably the 
young ladies acquitted themselves. 
The following program was ren- 
dered : 

Program r 

Hunting Song Mendelssohn 

Bland Clifton Bo wen. 

Deserted ) nvr „„ -n„™«n 

A Maid Sings Light...... \ Mac Dowe11 

Margaret Longfellow Sanborn. 

Berceuse, from Jocelyn, for violin 

Godard 

Christine Richards. 

Reading — Buying a Feller. 

Rowena Lee. 

Waltz Bohm 

Hannah Willard Ashe. 

Three Bouquets, with violin obligato, 

Braga 

Mary Ellen Durham. 

In September Steele 

May Lee Montague. 

Farewell, Duet Denza 

Margaret Longfellow Sanborn and 
Carrie Mott Cowles. 

The Swan, for violin Saint Saens 

Minna Hampton. 

Reading— The Soldier's Joy. .Ella Croft 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Yenetienne Godard 

Kate Leigh Winslow. 

o. — Im Herbst Franz 

b — Ah! 'Tis a Dream Hawley 

Mrs. Weihe. 

■Concert Etude d'Albert 

Catherine Mary Hampton. 



The L'Etoile German. 

On Saturday night, December 10, 
the L'Etoile German Club gave its 
annual german, complimentary to the 
Tau Delta Club. It was a Christ- 
mas german, aud the Christmas idea 
was carried out iu everything. The 
dainty programme cards were paint- 
ed with leaves and wreathes of holly, 
and fireplaces with the Christmas 
stockings. Evergreens, mixed with 
the Club colors, and a large Christ- 
mas tree, managed by Santa Clans, 
aud upon which, amid the tinsel 
and lights, were hung the dainty 
favors — Christmas bells, stockings, 
horns and tissue paper boas were the 
decorations in the parlor. There 
were two punch bowls in this ball- 
room, presided over by Christmas 
fairies, and in the French room, 
which evergreens and other decora- 
tions turned into a festive dining- 
room, were served the delicious re- 
freshments. With these were given 
the souvenirs — gold baby pins, with 
a holly leaf desigu upon them. 



The german was gracefully led by 
Mary Ellen Moore. Those present 
were : 

M. E. Moore with Miss Winston. 
M. Rossell with Miss Sue Prince. 
M. DuBose with Miss Hull. 
A. Clark with Miss Murchison. 
A. Spruill with Miss Slocomb. 
A. Fitz-Simons with Miss Williams, 
M. Eldredge with Miss Villapigue. 
I. Ruff with Miss Kate Glazebrook. 
M. Hunter with Miss Barnwell. 
G. Sullivan with Miss Walker. 
R. Clark with Miss Boylan. 
N. Edmonston with Miss Jones of 
Warrenton. 

S. Critz with Miss Albright. 

H. Clark with Miss Gibson. 

G. Whitaker with Miss Glazebrook. 

E. Drewry with Miss Kidder. 

K. Winslow with Miss Robingon. 

J. Carson with Miss Evans. 

J. Green with Miss Springs. 

J. Harris with Miss Gregory. 

L. Seay with Miss Croft. 

M. Short with Miss Stedman. 

S. Carter, stag. C. 



School Notes. 



Maria Webb, Elise Emerson aud 
Bessie Albright went home to spend 
Thanksgiving. 

Mary Slocomb and Alice Spruill 
attended the Gorgon Head German 
at Chapel Hill. 

Seuah Critz and Grace Whitaker 
spent Thanksgiving week at their 
home in Winston, to be present at 
the marriage of Miss Nannie Critz. 



8 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Miss Margaret Jones and Ger- 
trude Winston went to Oxford the 
last of November to be brides- 
maids at the marriage of Miss Alice 
Graham. 

Kate Winslow, Susie Carter, Rena 
Clark, Mary Robinson, Mamie Ros- 
sell, Emmie Drewry and Rubie and 
Willa Norn's attended the game of 
foot-ball between North Carolina 
and Virginia, in Richmond. 

Stuart Jones was at St. Mary's 
for several days last week. She and 
Sarah may be back after Christmas 
for the second term. We are hoping 
to have Maria Tucker and Elmer 
George back with us, then, too. 

Bettie Woolf was called home 
suddenly last month by the illness 
of her mother. She had our sym- 
pathy in the long, anxious trip. 
Her mother was better when we 
heard last, and we hope to have Bet- 
tie back again after Christmas. 



In Lighter Vein. 

Jean C. — Gertrude certainly does 
prevaricate badly. She always puts 
off everything. 

There are nine buildings at St. 
Mary's and only three Ruffs — Isa- 
bel, Ret, and Floy. 

I am sent with broom before, 
To sweep the hulls from off the floor. 

— R. H. C. 



Stately Verae. 

" If Mary goes far out to sea, 
By wayward breezes fanned, 

I'd like to know — can you tell me ? — 
Just where would Mary land. 

" If Tenny went high up in air, 
And looked o'er land and lea, 

Looked here and there and everywhere 
Pray what would Tennessee ? 

" I looked out of the window and 

Saw Orry on the lawn ; 
He's not there now, and who can tell 

Just where has Oregon ? 

" Two girls were quarreling one day 

With garden tools, and so 
I said, ' My dears, let Mary rake 

And just let Idaho. 

" A friend of mine lived in a flat 

With half a dozen boys ; 
When he fell ill I asked him why, 

He said ' I'm Illinois.' 

" An English lady had a steed, 
She called him ' Ighland Bay,' 

She rode for exercise, and thus 
Rhode Island every day." 

—Life. 



(At roll-call on her birthday.) 
"Miss Murchison." 
(J. M.)— " Thank you." 

Wanted — A belt for the waste of 
time. 

A sheet for the bed of the ocean. 

A barber for the face of the earth. 

New shoes for the foot of the 
Rockies. 

False teeth for the mouth of the 
Mississippi. — Ex. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Subscription, One Year, 
Single Copies, 



- One Dollar. 

Fifteen Cents. 



A Magazine published monthly except in 
July and August at St. Mary's School, .Ral- 
eigh, N. C, in the interest of the students and 
Alumnae, under the editorial management of 
the Senior Class. 

Address all communications and send all 
subscriptions to 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



CORRESPONDENCE FROM FRIENDS SOLICITED. 



Application made at the post-office at Raleigh. 



EDITORIALS. 



In this number of The Muse 
the editors wish all their friends 
and subscribers a merry Christmas. 
Thanksgiving, with its round of 
boxes and feasts has hardly gone, 
yet the Christmas spirit aud excite- 
ment is increasing daily among the 
St. Mary's girls. Every one is busily 
planniug Christmas presents and 
counting the days before the holi- 
days will begin. And just now, just 
when theholidays will begin, isavery 
serious question with us. We have 
heard so many different reports, and 
each report puts it a day farther off 
until we are very much distressed. 
We hope, however, when The 
Muse goes out to its subscribers the 
dates will have been settled satisfac- 
torily to all parties. 



EDITORIAL STAFF 
Anna B.Clark Editor in Chief. 

Margaret DuBose ( t iterirv Prtitnrs 

Sadie M. Jenkins ( Literary Editors. 

Ida P. Evans Social Editor. 

ES™^^ast::::::i ^cai Editors. 

Rena H. Clark Exchange Editor. 

Effie C. Fairley i 

Florence Grant J- Associate Editors. 

Mossie Long J 

Mary E. Rossell Business Maneger. 

Ellen P.Gibson, ) t «j 1< ._„ . j„ 

Dorothy M. Hughson, | Editors on Ads. 

for admission to the mail as second-class matter. 

The Muse is the paper of and 
for the entire school, and the edito- 
rial statT is only the medium for 
management, so we do not feel called 
upon to supply all the literary mat- 
ter for the paper. It is absolutely 
necessary that the student-body help 
us some, and when called upon to 
write some articles, to cheerfully 

comply in a way to make The Muse 
better aud brighter and some more 
readable. 



It is with a great deal of pleasure 
that we welcome Mr. DuBose back 
to St. Mary's. His health is greatly 
improved, and he is looking much 
better and stronger. The girls 
showed their delight at his return by 
giving him a rousing cheer when he 
entered the parlor for the evening 
roll-call. 



10 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Rev. Robert Drane, D. D., one of 
the trustees of the school, and father 
of an old St. Mary's girl, held ser- 
vices in the chapel one morning dur- 
ing Mr. DuBose's absence. Mr. 
Sanborn acted as lay-reader at the 
regular services in the Rector's ab- 
sence, and did it most acceptably. 

We are very glad to have received 
several exchanges during the last 
month. These magazines are put in 
the Library so that every girl at St. 
Mary's may keep in touch with 
the other schools. We would like 
to ask that the magazines be not 
taken from the Library. 

The Muse extends sincere sym- 
pathy to Miss Walton, who was 
called to her home, in Morgantou, 
on the 9th, to be with her sister, 
Miss Louise, who is ill. Miss Saun- 
ders is in charge of the Infirmary 
in Miss Walton's absence. 

St. Mary's felt a deep interest in 
the Thanksgiving Woman's Edition 
of the News and Observer, which 
was edited by the ladies of St. Phil- 
ip's Parish, Durham. Mrs. R. W. 
Winston ('Phronie Horner of St. 
Mary's) was the editor-in-chief, and 
Mrs. W. L. Wall (Annie Collins, 
'80), was in charge of the advertis- 
ing. 

We wish to acknowledge the follow- 
ing subscriptions received since the last 
issue, and to express our thanks here 
in place of a more formal acknowledge- 



ment: Misses M. and S. Hanckel, Mrs. 
M. Silver, Miss Florence Slater, Mrs. 
W. E. Lindsay, Carrie Helen Moore, 
Gussie Jones, Magdalen Marshal, Mary 
Henderson, Hannah Atmore, Mary 
Holman, Lilian Farmer, Mrs. J. T. 
Mason, Annie Koonce, Rosalie Bern- 
hardt and Alice S. Pearson. 



A Running Comment on the 
Month at St. Mary's. 

The beginning of the third month 
was also the beginning of the second 
quarter of the school year. After 
the first reports go home every girl 
determines to study harder and 
make the next ones better, so we 
have been trving to make this month 
a very successful one in the lessou 
line. There have been some very 
pleasant interruptions, though, just 
to keep our spirits up. 

The first entertainment was a re- 
ception, given by Margaret DuBose, 
to the Senior Class. The Seniors felt 
very important and gladly paraded 
before the other girls who were not 
so favored. It was quite a tax, 
though, to have to write the poetry 
which was required of us. 

Then the Seniors came into im- 
portance again, when St. Catherine's 
Chapter played " Scenes from Dick- 
ens" and " Six to One," on the 
night of November, the twenty- 
third. The parlor, which was 
changed into an opera house, was 
crowded, and the Chapter cleared 
forty-three dollars. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



11 



Next day was Thanksgiving and 
a holiday. A few of the girls went 
home and several went to Richmond 
to see the foot- ball game between 
North Carolina and Virginia, but 
most of us stayed at St. Mary's and 
went to church, sewed, danced and 
feasted all day. In the afternoon 
Mr. Sanborn, assisted, chaperoned a 
party of girls to see the A. & M.- 
Clemson foot-ball game. A. & M. 
won, and all except the South Caro- 
lina girls were very much satisfied. 
But great was the dismay among the 
North Carolina girls when they 
heard from the Richmond game. Of 
course, we cannot expect to win 
every time, but we hope to, anyway. 

On the night of the twenty-sixth, 
after a social evening, the Epsilon 
Alpha Pi entertained its new mem- 
bers, the Faculty and the officers of 
the Sigma Lamba Literary Society. 
The French Room, as happens very 
often, lost its dismal look in its 
festive dress, and every one enjoyed 
the reception. 

St. Anne's Chapter of the Junior 
Auxiliary claimed the night of De- 
cember the third for its entertain- 
ment. It played scenes from "The 
Bird's Christmas Carol," and had 
the "Quintette from Floradora." 
The " Floradora Drill" was rather 
out of the ordinary at St. Mary's, 
and was very effective. 

Just one more public recital be- 



fore Christmas, and it was very 
much like all the others. The per- 
formers, as usual, were very much 
frightened, and as usual played with 
credit to themselves and teachers. 

Saturday night, December the 
tenth, the L'Etoile German Club re- 
turned the dance given them by the 
Tau Delta Club. It was a Christ- 
mas german, and the evergreens, 
Christmas favors and score- cards 
and a Santa Claus, brought the feel- 
ing of Christmas nearer to the girls. 
Of course, half of us went as men 
and tried to act our parts with gen- 
tlemanly dignity. 

And now the third month with 
its work and pleasure is over, and 
we are glad to welcome December 
and its Christmas holidays. 



EXCHANGE DEPARTMENT. 



The old adage, that "everything 
comes to him that waits," is very 
characteristic of the St. Mary's 
Muse. In vain have our readers 
looked for the Exchange Depart- 
ment, and at last their patience is to 
be rewarded. We owe them an 
apology, aud our only excuse is the 
failure on our part to receive ex- 
changes. We trust that the other 
parts of The Muse have beeu so 
interesting that the delay will be 
pardoned. 



12 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



We realize that it is our duty to 
criticize, and though time and space 
will not allow us to say all that we 
desire, the Exchange editor hopes 
that every criticism, whether favora- 
ble or the reverse, which may ap- 
pear in these columns, will be re- 
ceived in the kindly manner in 
which it is intended, looked upon 
in the right light, for many are the 
trials and tribulations of a school 
paper, as we know from experince. 

We find the contents of the State 
Normal Magazine more attractive 
than the cover. It is very neatly 
gotten up, and seems to cover nearly 
every phase of the school life. 

Of course St. Mary's takes a great 
interest in the Red and White, and 
it is rather attractive, but don't you 
think its stories might be improved 
upon and there be a little more point 
to the jokes ? 

As The Muse goes to press there 
arrives the fall number of the Jn- 
look, the quarterly publication of 
our sister school of the Dioceses of 
Virginia. It is the first number 
in the new form, and deserves the 
highest praise. The typography is 
highly artistic, and the material ex- 
cellent. The editors and girls of 
V. F. I. can feel justly proud of the 
publication. We extend our best 
wishes and hope that the magazine 
will keep to the standard of the first 
number of 1905. 



We beg to acknowledge the follow- 
ing : The Winthrop College Journal, 
Clemson College Chronicle, The Wake 
Forest Student, The Mountaineer, The 
Washington Collegian, The Blue and 
Gray, The William Woods College Record 
and The Ounston Echo. 



With the Alumnse. 



Minnie Burgwyn, '04, spent three 
or four days at St. Mary's the first 
of December, on her way to Rich- 
mond. Pier many friends of last 
year were delighted to have her back. 

Carrie Helen Moore, '04, is visit- 
ing in Henderson, and Julia and Jo- 
sephine Boweu are spending the 
winter in Warrenton, Virginia. 

Octavia Hughes, Laura Clark, 
Mattie Jones, Lillie Slocomb and 
Minnie Burgwyn were visitors at 
St. Mary's last week, and were 
gladly welcomed. Octavia is just 
back from the Gorgon Head german 
at Chapel Hill, and from Raleigh 
will go to Virginia for Anne Gif- 
ford's debut party. 

Marie Walker Holmes, who was 
married in October, writes most in- 
terestingly of her camp life in the 
West, where she and her husband 
have gone for several months of "out 
of doors" instead of taking the con- 
ventional wedding trip. 

The first of January Mildred Til- 
ton will be marriad to Mr. Benjamin 
Throer, of Gainesville, Fla. 



ALUMNAE MATTERS. 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 



St. Mnry'S Alumnse Association. 

President, - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

(Mrs. M. T. Leak. Durham. 
Vice J Mrs. I. M. Pittenger Raleigh. 

Presidents, i Mrs. F. P. Tucker Raleigh. 
I Mrs. Kate deR. Meares, Wil- 
mington. 

Sec-Treas., Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 



Editorial Notes. 



The editors have been much 
pleased with the hearty interest that 
a part of the Alum nee have shown 
in The Muse during its brief re- 
vival, but there ii auuther large part 
which we feel must be interested 
and must wish to receive the paper, 
but who have as yet preserved a si- 
lence towards us. We are especially 
auxious to make the Alumnae sec- 
tion of The Muse interesting, but 
can only do it by the help of the 
Alumnae, scattered here and there, 
who are in a position to give the 
news that we are in ignorance of. 

A girl of the early '80's, or again 
of the early '90's, reads over the 
Alumnae notes and savs, to herself, 
" There seems to be news here for 
somebody, but I am not much in- 
terested, inasmuch as the names are 
only names to me." The Muse 
wishes to cover every period of the 
Alumnae, and would do so if the 
means were within reach, but it can 
only be possible by the co-operation 



of the members of the Alumnae ; 
each of these doubtless keeps up 
with some of her school-mates, but 
most of them have lost sight of the 
majority with whom they were once 
thrown in all the intimacy of school 
life. To most Alumnae, of only a 
few years back, the present day 
life of a school is chiefly interesting, 
as showing its progress and stand- 
ards. When school-mates and teach- 
ers have left the familiar scenes, it is 
sometimes sad, rather than agreea- 
ble, to read of the younger genera- 
tion who now fill the well-known 
places, unless those new names recall 
the images of the past, and the new 
life marks an improvement on the 
old. But one or two paragraphs in 
the school paper, telling us of those 
of whom we were once so fond, and 
whose separation from us we have 
so much regretted, make the whole 
paper seem "worth while" to us. 
Should not each Alumnae who 
wishes The Muse to succeed, think 
it worth while to drop the editors at 
least a line with any little item of 

news of herself or her friends that 
would thus reach many who might 
otherwise not hear of it, trusting to 
some of those others to reciprocate 
the attention and so make the paper 
better and brighter ? We would 
much like it to be so. 



14 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



It is a privilege to be able to print 
further on a letter of Mrs. W. E. 
Lindsay, of Glendale, S. C, who, as 
Ella Tew, took part in the first pro- 
duction of The Muse, back in 
1879, and was a member of the first 
class which formally graduated from 
St. Mary's. We greatly appreciate 
Mrs. Lindsay's letter, and will have 
more to say in later issues about her 
suggestions in regard to Class Re- 
unions, which we all know know 
are a vital factor in the life and 
growth of Alumnse spirit and of 
Alum use work. 

For months the Chapel has occu- 
pied the front of the stage in the 
interest of the Alumme and friends 
of St. Mary's. Nor, now that the 
re-building is practically complete 
and it loses its place as the visible 
evidence of the growth of St. Mary's, 
will it lose its permanent place as 
the type of what is best in St. 
Mary's life, of the inner rather than 
the outward development. The new 
Chapel is all that could be desired. 

Mrs. Iredell, the President of the 
Alumna?, wishes us to say that the 
Chapel Fund is progressing nicely, 
but so greatly have the expenses ex- 
ceeded the estimates that there is 
still need of contributions, small or 
large, and that any such will be 
most cordially welcomed. 

The Christmas poem with which 
this number of The Muse opens, is 



another selection from " The Palace 
of the Heart and Other Poems of 
Love," by Miss Pattie Williams 
Gee, which has just appeared from 
the presses of Richard G. Badger, 
Boston. In the words of the an- 
nouncement, " This book, although 
Miss Gee's first published volume, 
is sure to attract the attention of lov- 
ers of genuine poetry and the excep- 
tional promise it gives of even more 
exquisite achievement. As Miss 
Gee is a daughter of North Carolina 
it is natural that her stirring tribute 
to Mater Mea Carolina should be 
the strongest as well as the longest 
poem in the volume." 

A Little Journey Baek. 



Such a letter as the following 

touches a responsive chord in the 

heart of every girl, who out in the 

big, broad world still has time to 

look back to and think over her 

recollections of her dear Alma Mater: 

Glendale, S. 0., 
November, 1904. 

Editors of The St. Mary's Muse : 

My Dear Girls : — * * * I saw with 
regret the death of an old school- 
mate, Mildred Cameron Shepherd, in 
the November number. The Muse can 
do so much to keep us informed about 
the school-mates of years long past — 
that in itself makes it worth its sub- 
scription. 

I was a "charter member" of the 
editorial staff, and how we labored over 
it under the able direction of Mr. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



15 



Sanborn, Mrs. Meares and Miss Czar- 
nomska ! Have you ever seen one of 
the earliest numbers? — a little eight- 
page pamphlet ! By the second year it 
had grown to be a nice, blue-covered 
little magazine, and its commencement 
number contained our graduating es- 
says as the first class at St. Mary's to 
secure diplomas ! 

Are class reunions ever held at St. 
Mary's ? Any commencement there 
would be full of pleasure to an Alum- 
na?, but think of meeting once more in 
those classic halls the very same Josies, 
Lucies, Kates, etc., with whom one 
walked and studied and enjoyed the 
life of the " good old days !" 

Excuse my long letter, but, after all, 
you are my younger sisters ! 
Cordially yours, 

Ella Tew Lindsay. 



We have a copy of The Muse 
before us now bearing date of May 
1879 ; " No. 8" of " Vol. I," one of 
the " little eight-page pamphlets" of 
which Mrs. Lindsay speaks. It is 
" devoted to Music, Literature and 
the Interests of St. Mary's School," 
aud " published monthly by the 
Department of Music; edited by 
Euterpe and the Pierian Club, un- 
the patronage of the Lady Princi- 
pal." From Dr. Bennett Smedes' 
advertisement of the school we learn 
that the " 74th term began Jan. 31, 
1879." 

It is our purpose from time to 
time to quote more or less freely from 
these Muses of by-gone years — for 
we are fortunate in possessing almost 
a complete file — and to read in the 



past for both the pleasure and the 

profit of the present. 

We pick up a copy of the Nov., 

'80, Muse, and read the following : 

Fair Week, among its many pleasures, 
brought us none so bright and welcome 
as the visits of our " old girls." Among 
them were Mildred Cameron, Annie 
Collins, Annie R. and Annie E. Jones, 
Nita Hughes, Mrs. Shober (May Wheat), 
Mrs. Mary (Garrett) Harrison, Mrs. 
Mary (Rawlinson) Myers, and Mrs. 
Lucy (Moore) Henry of Kittrell. 
Some had their husbands and some 
ther babies to introduce to St. Mary's. 
Several girls, daughters of girls who 
were here " long, long ago," came to 
see the happy school their mothers had 
told them so much about ; and lots of 
future aspirants for scholastic honors 
came to lay in a store of memories 
wherewith to feed their hopes mean- 
while. 

"Fair week" still rolls rouud 
yearly, and this description of its 
visitors is as true to-day as a quarter 
century ago ; but what of the "girls" 
whom we read of here? It was our 
sad duty only last month, in the 
November issue of The Muse, just 
24 years later then the above, to 
chronicle Mrs. Mildred (Cameron) 
Shepherd's death. "Annie Collins" 
was again a guest at the school last 
June, when, as Mrs. Walter Wall, 
she was an active delegate at the 
Convention of the Woman's Auxil- 
iary. "Annie R. Jones," (Mrs. Robt. 
Davis of Louisburg) and Mrs. Har- 
rison of Enfield, are still in our 
neighborhood. Mrs. Shober has be- 



16 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



come almost more at home in far-off 
California, than in her native heath. 
The others for the moment have es- 
caped our knowledge. We should 
like to know of them as well as of 
hundreds of others, St. Mary's 
girls like these. We hate to think 
that it is possible to drift so far apart. 
We want The Muse to make that 
drifting as inconsiderable as possible. 



OFFICIAL NOTICES. 



Alumnae Notes. 

Wednesday afternoon, December 
seventh, Mrs. R. H. Lewis and 
Miss Mattie Bailey were guests at 
a called meeting of the St. Mary's 
branch of the Woman's Auxiliary, 
and gave most interesting accounts 
of their impressions of the Geoeral 
Convention in Boston. Mrs. Lewis 
spoke of the interest of Boston, of 
the social features and of the work 
of the Convention in general — while 
Miss Bailey spoke more particularly 
of the work accomplished by and 
business planned for the Woman's 
Auxiliary. Their accounts gave a 
most intimate and inspiring glimpse 
of the inner life and spirit of the 
great assembly. 

November 22nd Lily Gray was 
married to Mr. Fish, of New York, 
and on the 23d Margaret Best Har- 
ris to Mr. M. W. Crocker. 

Kate Hedgepath was married to 
Mr. Bennett, of Clio, South Caro- 
lina, December 7th. 



The Christmas Holiday. 

The Rector hereby announces that 
the Christmas vacation will begin 
on Thursday, December 22, at 1.00 
p. M. The holiday closes January 
4, and all pupils are required to re- 
port for duty at the Chapel Service, 
at 9.00 A. M., Thursday, January 5. 

The attention of all pupils is 
called to the regulation that any pre- 
mature leaving of school duties be- 
fore the holidays, or tardy returning 
to school duties after the holidays, 
regardless of the excuse for this, 
debars the pupil from the Honor 
Roll. 



School Program. 

(December-January.) 



Dec. 17, 8:15 p. m. St. Margaret's 
Chapter. 

Dec. 17, 19, 20, 21. Music Examina- 
tions. 

Dec. 20, 8:00 p. m 

Dec. 22, 1:00 p.m. Christmas Holi- 
day Begins. 

Jan. 5, 8:05 a. m. Regular Work Re- 
sumed. 

Jan. 6, Epiphany: 9. a. m., Special 
Service. 

Jan. 7 

Jan. 14. Public Lecture. 

o 

Good girls love their brothers ; 

So good have I grown, 
That I love other girls' brothers 
Better than my own. — Ex. 



j& ADVERTISEMENTS. j& 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in Tite Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss not ours. 



North Carolina's Leading 
Dry Goods Store 

DOBBIN & FERRALL, 

122 and 125 Fayetteville St., (at Tucker's Store). 
Perfectly equipped mail order service. 

Correspondence solicited. 
We prepay postage, express or freight charge 
anywhere in North Carolina on all cash mail 
orders amounting to $5.00 or more. 

DOBBIN & FERRALL. 



^s^> 



E ST B D. 1 8 5 8, 




r }{^AHLER's50Ns\ 

JEWELERS, I 

RAbEIGH, N.Cy 



BOYLAN, PEAROE & CO., 



Dry Goods, Millinery, 
Tailored Costumes 
Gloves, Hosiery, . 
Handkerchiefs, . . 
Underwear, . . . 
Fancy Goods. . . 



Mail orders filled intelligently and promptly. 



FAYETTEVILLE AND SALISBURY STREETS, 

Raleigh, N. C. 



Send to 
ALFRED WILLIAMS & CO., 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



BOOKS . . 
of all kinds. 

Select line of . 
STATIONERY. 

Eastman's Kodaks 
and supplies. . . 

Office supplies. 



Have 
WHARTON 

To make your 
PHOTOGRAPHS. 

Remember it PAYS 
to get the BEST. . 



HART-WARD HARDWARE CO., 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Best of everything in Hardware. 
Satisfaction guaranteed or money refunded 
Ail-Right Cook Stoves. Celebrated Warm Air 

Heaters, the only perfect heater made. Write 

for prices. 



'®d£Mi 



& 



EVERYTHING IN 
DRY GOODS. . . . 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



Advertisements. 



W. C. STRONACH'8 

SONS CO., 
. . Grocers. . . 
215 Fayetteville Street. 

KING'S GROCERY, 

" The Little Store.,' 

FOR QUICK COOKING 

Nothing exceeds the 

Gas R an ge. 

Always ready. . 
No dirt or ashes. 



TOIL LIGHT, 

Use the Best: The Welsbach Light. 



STANDARD GAS ELECTRIC CO., 
124 Fayetteville Street. 

JNO. P. HAYES, Photographer, 

Kodak work of all kinds. 

Don't forget to buy your Shoes of 

POOLE & ALLEN'S Shoe Store. 

KING'S UP-TO-DATE DRUG STORE 

AND SODA FOUNTAIN. 

Cor. Fayetteville and Hargett Sts. 

You'll find up-to-date Shoes at 

HUNTER BROS & BREWER. 

ELLINGTONS ART STORE, 

Raleigh, N. O. 
Everything In art. 
Embroidery, materials, Wools and Zephyrs. 

Private, <Dinsng and Banquet Halls at 

GIERSCH'S, 216 Fayetteville St. 

THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS, Raleigh, N. C. 

Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful service 
and value. 

DARNELL & THOMAS, 
Pianos and Organs. 
Sheet music and small goods. 

BALEIGH, N, C. 

Remember DUGHI. 



ROSENTHAL & CO., 

Grocers, 

136 FAYETTEVILLE STREET. 



Good things always at 

BRETSCH'S BAKERY. 

Buy ROYSTER'S Fine Candies. 
Fine Sporting Goods. 

SINGER SEWING MACHINE, 

130 Fayetteville Street. 

SALVERTORE DESIO, 

Mfg. Jewelek and Silversmith, 

1012 F. St., N. W., 
Washington, D. C. 

On application will send any article selected. 
To St. Mary's, discount of ten per cent. 

THE J. D. RIGGAN COMPANY. 

Holiday Goods. 

WEATHERS & UTLEY, 

Art Dealers. 

MISSES REESE & CO., 

Millinery. 



CALIFORNIA FRUIT STORE, 

Fruit and Confections. 



ANTICEPHALALGINE cures quickly and 
safely Headache in all its forms. 

JOLLY & WYNNE JEWELRY CO. 

Wedding and Holiday presents. 
Fine Watch and Jewelry repairing, 

CROWELL'S . . 
DRUG STORE. 

120 Fayetteville Street. 

For the most satisfactory work, 
Try RIGSBEE at 
Watson & Co.'s Gallery. PHOTOGRAPHS. 



T. W. BLAKE, 

Rich Jewelry and Silverware. 
Repairing promptly done. 

PERRY & ROSENTHAL, Trust Bldg. 

Ladies' Fine Shoes. 

Dr. V. E. TURNER, 

Dentist. 



Central 



)linas. 



Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 



St. Mary's School, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



(for {/ir~!s and young women). 



03d ANNUAL SESSION BECf AN SEPTEMBER 15, 1904 



SESSION DIVIDE!) INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGtNS JANUARY i>6, 1905. 



1. THE COLLEGE, ^B 

2, THE MUSIC SCHOOL. 
SL Mary s 

offen induction in keU *■ THE BUSINESS SCHOOL. 
DepartmeMs: / 4 TRB ART SCHOOL. . 

i>; THE PEEP A RA TOBY S\ HOOP. 



In 1903-4 were enrolled 241 stndents from 17 Dioce^e^. 

h^A^Si Twentv-five Members in the Faculty. 



Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much equipment New. Twenty-eight 

Pianos. New Chickering Grand Piano Just Added. 

Special attention to the Social a >id Chrixtutn Sid, oj Ednoiil >on n 
to the scholastic training. ^^'^^t^v^l? BMm&MfiHa£are» 



ithont yliaht 



For Catalogue and other information addrcxs 

Rev. McNeely DuBose, P. S., P. P.. 



in-:: roll. 



January 1005 



m 



'ffibc 



t. flfoary's /Ibuse 



* 



IRaldgb, W C. 



T 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

CHRISTMAS NUMBER. 

Vol. IX. January, 1905. No. 6. 



WINTER'S ROMANCE. 



Once a little Snow Man 

Lived beneath a tree, 
A single little, solemn little 

Silent man was he. 

He'd never seen the sunshine, 

Nor felt the kindly dew, 
Yet just beside him in the cold 

A dainty snowdrop grew. 

She did not seem to fear him, 

Grew nearer every day, 
Her purity and beauty sweet 

Just stole his heart away. 

But she had heard from Mother Earth 

Of butterflies and Spring, 
And when the Snow Man told his love, 

She answered not a thing. 

And then he bent to whisper low 

But she did say him nay, 
And the little love-sick Snow Man 

Melted quite away. 



M. R. DuB. 



THE CHRISTMAS EXCHANGE. 



Jack Seers was always teasing his sister. In fact it was his favorite 
occupation. "Sis" (as he called her, it being her pet aversion to be so 
called) "is so sentimental," he would say. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



•'She would be kissing door-knobs, because some of her 'darlings' had 
had their 'dear' hands on theni ; or taking up their footprints in the sand, 
if I were not here to be her spiritual guardian. And as for gushing, 
my cuss words are not half as bad as her gush words." 

As for Nell, she thought Jack "the most vexing piece of humanity" 
that ever was ! But — it was awfully convenient to have somebody to 
take one around at night, and to run errands for one, and he was real 
good about it, too, especially if he had just had his fill of teasing. And 
after all Jack was lots of fun, sometimes. 

Another source of much amusement to Jack was "Sis' " Christmas 
presents. "Just wait till the Great Annual Christmas Exchange," he 
would say, "then you will hear some delicious gush words !" 

On Christmas morning "Sis' ; presents to- her numerous friends 
were always elaborately tied up and put into a waiter, and Jack was 
despatched to distribute them to their various destinations. After some 
time he would return with the waiter filled again with presents for 
Nell. This he always did after he had had his fill of teasing. 

On this particular Christmas morning, it seems he had not quite had 
his fill, although it seemed to Nell as if he had had enough to last till 
next Christmas. As he marched down the street whistling, she thought 
he had a wicked look in his eye, but decided he was only thinking of 
some past pranks. So she passed on into the house, wondering what 
he would bring back on the waiter. 

Meanwhile, Jack pranced on down the street until he got out of 
"Sis' ; ' sight. Then some strange sleight of hand tricks were performed. 
On the waiter were about a dozen presents and slipped under the rib- 
bons of each was a card with Nell's name and "With all the love in the 
world" written on each one. All these presents except one were 
stuffed into his pockets, as well out of sight as possible. Then Jack 
bounced up the steps of the first house, 

"Here's a present for Jennie from Nell," he said. 

A present was then handed to him for Nell, and he was off. When 
out of sight, there was a little change of the cards. One of Nell's cards 
was quickly attached to the present just received while its proper card 
was slipped into a. pocket, and it was handed in at the next door. 

When the presents from each house had been passed on to the next 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



house in this way, and he had delivered the last one, he turned for 
home. 

"Here's the exchange, Sis," he said, and as Nell took the waiter with 
an expectant air and rushed into the sitting-room, he whispered to his 
chum whom he had brought with him, "iSTow watch the gush words come 
fast and furious !" 

"Oh, what a bea — utiful picture from Jennie ! Why its just like the 
one I sent Bess." 

"And here's a book from Margaret. Lets see what it is. 'An Old 
Sweetheart of Mine.' Why I sent one of those to Kinsie. How 
funny !" 

"And here's the dearest little work-apron, like the one I sent — why 
that's the one I made, for I know my stitches. What in this world has 
J ack done ?" 

And as iNell hurriedly opened the rest of the packages there was a 
low whistle outside, and two boys disappeared out of the door and 
around the corner. 

"Jack, oh oh Jack, you horrid creature, please come here." 

But Jack was gone. L. R. T. 



SCHOOL NOTES. 



Annie Sloan visited Bet Ruff during the holidays. 

Pattie Barden spent a few days in Plymouth with Katie Loane. 

Ellen Gibson and Marguerite Springs exchanged visits while at 
heme. 

Helen Crenshaw visited St. Mary's while on her way back to Con- 
verse. 

Bettie WooLf has returned to school. Her mother's health is much 
improved. 

Kate Winslow and Octavia Hughes spent part of the holidays with 
Mary Robinson. 

Rena Clark and Annie Gray ISTash were guests at a house-party given 
by Elba Cotten the last of December. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



We regret that Floy Ruff, Amy Fitzsimons, Minna Hampton and 
Fannie Williams will not return to us. We shall miss them. 

Anna Clark, Minnie Burgwyn ('04) and Margaret Stedman ('04) 
spent part of the holidays with Mattie Hunter. 

We are glad to have added to our number Helen Liddell of Charlotte, 
Isabelle Clark of Tarboro, and Cornie Fairley of Monroe. 

Mamie Rossell spent the holidays in Wilmington with Jennie Mur- 
chison. Harriet Webster visited Mossie Long at her home in Rock- 
ingham. 

On January the fifth, the Cornell Glee Club came to St. Mary's and 
sang a few selections for the girls, who were very appreciative. Their 
voices were unusually good. 

Monday night, January the ninth, the St. Mary's girls enjoyed the 
rare pleasure of going to the theatre. The entertainment was the muBi- 
cal comedy "The Girl, from Kays." 

The Primary Department, under the supervision of Miss Bowen, 
gave a very delightful entertainment on the evening of December 20th. 
The programme consisted of songs, choruses and pantomimes, and was 
highly enjoyed. 

Just before Christmas Miss Hull and Miss Pixley, assisted, chaper- 
oned a large number of the music pupils to the Baptist University to 
the Artist's Recital given by Miss Marie von Unschuld. It was a great 
musical treat, and thoroughly enjoyed by all. 



"A CASE OF SUSPENSION." 



St. Margaret's Chapter gave a charming little play on the evening of 
December 17th, in its rendition of that bright little farce "A Case of 
Suspension." The girls had been well trained by Miss Balfour, though 
the great success of the entertainment was due largely to the untiring 
work of Susie Carter, the Chapter president. The parts were all ex- 
cellently taken — Harriet Webster as Professor Edgerton, and Selma 
Thorne and Susie Carter as two of the girls being especially good. 

Owing to the bad weather the audience was not as large as usual. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



The cast included : 

Dorothy Sel ma Thorne. 

Alice Susie Carter. 

Mildred Bessie Gray. 

Tom Christine Klingensmith. 

Jack Virginia Miller. 



Harold Nancy Pearson. 

Miss Judkins Eula Gregory. 

Prof. Edgerton... Harriett Webster. 

Kathleen Jessie Chapman. 

Jonas May Hane. 



CHRISTMAS AT ST. MARY'S. 



With many misgivings the girls who were left at St. Mary's for the 
holidays, saw the last carriage of fortunate ones roll away. They soon 
found, however, that their lot was not as hard as they expected. Mr. 
and Mrs. DuBose, Mr. and Mrs. Sanborn, and Mrs. Seay combined 
efforts to make St. Mary's as much like home at this season as possible. 

On Christmas Eve Mrs. DuBose had a Christmas tree in the parlor, 
and the usual excitement was aroused by the numerous packages which 
each girl, received. 

The visitors at St. Mary's added a great deal to the pleasure of the 
holidays. They were : Catherine Wiggins, Gussie Jones, Florence 
Cowles and Jamie Sanborn. Margaret DuBose gave a very delightful 
tea to the guests. 

The theatre, dancing, boxes from home, and the unusual freedom im- 
pressed upon us the truth of what we had often heard before, that a 
Christmas at St. Mary's is a very merry one. L. S. 



IN LIGHTER VEIN. 



Dorothy Slocum's last (and characteristic) remark, as she boarded 
the train for home — "I wonder if I shall see any stranger on here I 
know." 

Alice Spruill was displaying with great pride her new traveling bag 
when Gertrude Winston hesitatingly remarked, "Alice, it is very pretty, 
but don't you think it a little large for a pocket-book." 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



"What happens on the fifteenth of the month? 
The girls fall to Musing." 

'•What has ears and hear not? Corn. 
What have eyes and see not? Potatoes. 
Why are music pupils like corn and potatoes?" — Ex. 

"What is the feminine of monk? Monkey." — Ex. 

"Willie looked at Polly; 
O, What a pretty Miss, 
He stole a little nearer, 
Then bashfully stole — away." — Ex. 

"Of all the hard work under the sun, 
The hardest that I have ever done, 
Is trying to make a little fun, 
And writing jokes when I don't know one." — Ex. 

Wanted (for Mr. Stone) — A pupil with a slow but sure brain, to 
whom relicts of Old English found in North Carolina are extremely 
interesting and who can talk well on such subjects at dinner parties. 
She must thoroughly believe in the old adage "Practice makes perfect." 
Any such young lady will be welcomed with open arms by the senior 
class and given front seat at all recitations. The only requirement 
for an applicant is that she shall have a name that can be traced back 
to the wilds of the German forests. 



A GRAY HORSE OF ANOTHER COLOR. 



Thursday, Dec. 29, 1904. 
Dear Mary: — I wish you could be at home with me. I've been to three 
dances already this week, and every night we are up 'till after two or three 
o'clock, and I am not a bit tired — Et cetera. 

Lovingly, Nan. 

St. Mary's, Raleigh, N. C, Jan. 14, 1905. 
My Dear Mother: — We are having awful exams. Two nights in succession 
I had to sit up till half past eleven o'clock studying and I am worn out. Don't 
you think its terrible that I have to lose so much sleep? Write soon. Hastily, 

Nan. 

S. M. J. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



IN MEMOEIAM. 



Entered into rest at her home, "Battle Hill," Jackson, 

Miss., shortly after noon on the Eve of Epiphany, — Lucy 

Randolph Bratton — wife of Rt. Rev. Theo. D. Bratton, 

Bishop of Mississippi, and formerly School Mother of St. 

Mary's. 

Lucy Randolph, of the Virginia Randolphs, was born in Talla- 
hassee, Florida, July 21, 1862, and spent her girlhood and young 
womanhood in that city. In July, 1888, she was married to Rev. 
T. D. Bratton, then a deacon in South Carolina. For eleven years 
she shared the work of her husband as Rector of the Church of the 
Advent, Spartanburg, and then came with him to St. Mary's School 
in 1899 to take up the duties of School Mother, when Dr. Bratton 
assumed those of Rector. Her four years at the School are indeli- 
bly impressed on the lives of all that knew her. In August, 1903, 
Mrs. Bratton left Raleigh for Jackson when the new Bishop entered 
into his bishopric. She leaves behind her now her husband and five 
children, the youngest aged two. 



Entered into rest on Thursday, December 15, 1904, in Bal- 
timore, — Nannie Belvin, — a graduate of St. Mary's and a 
former teacher in the school. 

Nannie Belvin was born in Raleigh, April 3, 1882, and spent her 
life in this city. She entered St. Mary's in September 1896, and 
made an excellent record in her four years course, graduating with 
the highest honors with the class of 1900. The next year she was 
appointed to the faculty as assistant in English, but was soon forced 
by ill health to give up the work and was never able to resume it. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

Subscription, One Year. = = s = One Dollar. 

Single Copies. = r * = ■ Fifteen Cents. 



A Magazine published monthly except in EDITORIAL STAFF 

July and August atSt. Mary's School, Raleigh, Anna B clark Editor in Chief. 

N. C, in the interest of the students and Margaret DuBose l T ««««r™m«». 

Alumnae, under the editorial management of Sadie M. Jenkins / Llrer,iry ^uiiure. 

the Senior Class. Ida P. Evans Social Editor. 

Address all communications and send all Linda Tillinghast"~III"j ^ocal Editors, 

subscriptions to Rena H _ (jiarjj Exchange Editor. 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, Eme C. Fairley ) 

Florence Grant V Associate Editors. 

RALEIGH, N. C. Mossie Long J 

Mary E. Rossell Business Manager. 



CORRESPONDENCE FROM FRIENDS SOLICITED. 



Ellen P. Gibson \ FrHfnrR on A(iR 

Dorothy M. Hughson / & aitOTS on Aas - 



Application made at the post-office at Raleigh, for admission to the mail as second-class matter. 



EDITORIALS. 



Of all the months of the year, January, perhaps, is the most unwel- 
come to the St. Mary's girls. Like their fellow-students of other schools, 
they are returning from the pleasant Christmas holidays to begin five 
long months of hard study, and the mid-year examinations, which are 
over in many schools before the holidays 'begin, are called to the other 
trials of the month. 

But the new year has started off very satisfactorily at St. Mary's. 
There seems to be very little homesickness and "blues" among the girls, 
and although we regret the loss of several of our old girls, we are glad 
to welcome new faces into the family circle. 

For the Seniors, this year of 1905 is of especial interest. It is really 
their je^r, the date which marks the ending of their school life, and the 
beginning of real life. They trust that it will be a very prosperous 
year for all. 



St. ?,Liry's has seldom had such a rude shock as was experienced by 
both faculty and old pupils at the receipt of the entirely unexpected 
telegram which reached the Rector on the evening of January 5th, an- 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



iiouncmg the death of Mrs. Bratton, so thoroughly loved as School 
Mother during the Rectorship of Bishop Bratton. Her many friends 
at St. Mary's had supposed her in excellent health but an teute attack 
of nephritis brought the end after an illness of only four day. We feel 
a deep personal loss of one who has been a potent fictor in the St. Mary's 
life of the administration lately ended, and our deepest sympathy goes 
out to the Bishop and his family in their sore affliction. 



By the death of Miss Eleanor Clement of Gemiantown, Pa., men- 
tion of which was made in the December Muse, and an account of 
whose life is given elsewhere in this paper, St. Mary's is endowed with 
another $5,000 fund for the establishment of a scholarship and is left 
final heir to Miss Clement's estate, a life interest in which she devises 
to her life-long friend and companion, Miss O'Connor, of Germantown. 
St. Mary's is deeply appreciative of Miss Clement's generosity, and 
rejoices at the added opportunities for usefulness which, are made possi- 
ble by the gift. 



MISS CLEMENT. 



The scholarship legacy of five thousand dollars, by bequest from 
Miss Eleanor Clement of Germantown, Pa., of which the Boa T d of 
Trustees of St. Mary's School has had recent notification, will no doubt 
give rise to inquiries from many who are interested. 

Those who knew St. Mary's "in the forties" will not need any re- 
minder of Madame Clement, who came with Dr. Aldert Smedes to 
Raleigh in 1842 to take charge of the French department:, and v;ho 
proved a most capable and valuable assistant in his work of building up 
St. Mary's. 

When Madame Clement came to America she left her only child, 
Eleanor, then very young, with two aunts living in Paris, and the little 
girl remained with them until she was twelve or thirteen years old 
when she joined her mother at St. Mary's to receive there her English 
education. Then she spent a few years again in Paris to fit her for the 
position of teacher of French at St. Mary's. This place she filled for 



10 The St. Mary's Muse. 

some time, making many friends as she had done previously while a 
pupil. During these years of her life at St. Mary's, Miss Clement was 
the recipient of many kindnesses in the homes of her school friends, and 
these attentions made a lasting impression upon what seems to have 
been a deeply grateful nature. Many instances might be given of bene- 
factions extended by her in later life to the children of her early friends, 
and her interest in St. Mary's was marked throughout her life. 

It was not until 1867 or '68, many years after Madame Clement had 
left St. Mary's, that she and her daughter founded a school in German- 
town, Pa., under church auspices. There they gathered around them 
most efficient teachers, and the school, had the benefit of sorre of the best 
lecturers in the country. For more than twenty-five years it wa-j con- 
tinued with great success. 

Several years after the founding of this school, Miss Clement came 
with Miss O'Connor to make a visit at St. Mary's. And about five 
years ago she was again in Raleigh visiting Miss Bailey, a former pupil 
of the Germantown School. 

Madame Clement died in 1878, and Miss Clement, after six or eight 
years gave up her school and sold the property, but continued to live 
in Germantown, having her friend Miss O'Connor wills her, from that 
time until Miss Clement's death which occurred on October 1, 1904. 
She was a woman of wide culture and high aims, and t:he led a useful 
life full of good works, spending the means with which God had blessed 
her own and her mother's efforts in charitable and church work. Sev- 
eral times she went abroad, for she had cousins in Europe. She was in 
London with her friend Miss O'Connor when she heard thai; St. Mary's 
had become a diocesan institution. In a letter writ fen upon the re- 
ceipt of this intelligence, she says, "You will know how glad I am 
when I tell you that it has long been my wish to make some provision 
for St. Mary's in my will, and I could not do this while it was a private 
school. Now I can carry out my intention." This ^he did, and most 
nobly, as the sequel has proved. In her will, she remembered the 
church she loved and every branch of its mission work, — charities in 
which she had always shown a living interest, — the poor of her parish, 
faithful servants of her own and of her mother, her relatives and sev- 



The St. Mary's Muse. 11 

eral friends, — foremost among them Miss O'Connor. This jnend Avho 
was her teacher when she first came as a little girl to St. Mary's, taught 
afterwards at '"Madame Clement's School," and for ten years lived in 
Miss Clement's home as a sister. 

When the ample provision made for her shall be no longer needed, the 
body of Miss Clement's estate is left to St. Mary's. The manner of the 
bequest is as beautiful as the gift is noble, and the whole is worthy of the 
woman who while she lived gave gladly and freely and led others to do 
the same. 

In a letter recently received from one of Miss Clement's friends wo 
find this tribute to her character : 

"She was a godly woman, full of grace and true charity, and a 
most loyal, faithful friend. I am glad to have counted myself as one 
of those who dearly loved and valued her, and who enjoyed her affection 
and friendship to the end of her life." 

Miss Clement had made her plans to go with two of her former pupils 
to Boston for the meeting of the Triennial Convention, bnl violent ill- 
ness prevented, and on the first day of October, she entered into rest. 

"He that hath my commandments and keepeth them, he it is that 
loveth Me." M. I. 



ALUMNAE MATTERS, 

Communications and Correspondence Soliciied. 
St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 

President, - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

f Mrs. M T Leak, Durham. 
VirF-PRFSTr.FNTs i Mrs - l M - Pitter >g er > Raleigh, 

VICE-PRESIDENTS, < Mrg F p Tucker R a l e i R h, 

(.Mrs.KatedeR Meares, Wilmington. 
Sec-Treas., - Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 



MUS. BRATTON. 



The death, of Mrs. Bratton is this month uppermost in the hearts and 
feelings of the friends of St. Mary's. Words are inadequate, but the 
following tributes, — the one from a member of Dr. Bratton's faculty at 
St. Mary's, the other from a friend of her girlhood, voice a general 
belief. 

The death of Mrs. Bratton has cast a deep shadow upon the hearts 
of all who knew her. 

Just, generous, sympathetic, discreet, self-sacrificing, unwearying, 
uncomplaining, earnest character, steadfast friend, devoted daughter, 
loving mother, noble wife ; all these she was, and more. 

Her daily life was a constant example of the beauty of cheerfulness, 
self-abnegation, filial devotion, the "charity that speaketh no evil." 

As "School Mother" she was sharer of all the joys and sorrows, all 
the hopes and aspirations, all the trials and petty vexations that come in 
the life of a school girl ; and her wise council, was ever a help and an 
inspiration to all who invoked it. Loved and mourned by all, her 
charming personality and many virtues will live forever in our memo- 
ries : and the record of her life at St. Mary's, be among the brightest in 
its annals. G. C. S. 

When news was received in Tallahassee that Mrs. Bratton had passed 
from sight and touch and earthly ken many were the hearts saddened. 
For long distances and years of separation have never lessened the sveet 
memories and loving thoughts of her in this the home of her childhood 
and early womanhood. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 13 



From childhood she was beloved by all who came near her life. Arid 
to how many did her presence bring sunshine ! The gentle thought for 
others, the kind word, the bright smile — these were the natural expres- 
sion of her loving spirit. Hers was one of those rare natures uniting 
warmth of feeling with tact and poise and social grace. How natural 
it was to say, "Every one loves Lucy Randolph," and how true it was. 

When still a child she was confirmed in the old Church of St. John's. 
Attending regularly upon the services of the Church, and sharing in the 
parish work as soon as her years permitted, the influence of her sweet, 
Christian life was felt by her companions. We recall her marriage, 
when the Church was filled with friends whose hearts wished her God* 
speed in her new life, while retaining bright memories of her for the 
years to come. 

Yet in our sadness we feel that such a life cannot pass away, and we 
realize 

"That life is ever lord of death 

And love can never lose its own." 

C. M. B. 



MISS BELVUsT 



ii * * * They hear the welcome sound which means eleven o'clock and a 
pleasant hour with Miss Belvin. With quick steps and light hearts they run through 
the covered way to the English room, and the sun seems to shine again. * * * 
But how quickly time flies! Can that possibly be the bell? It cannot be, and this 
their last day together, too. When will they all meet there again? Ah, life is not so 
bright after all! And just see how it is raining. Yes, there goes the five minutes 
bell; but with heavy hearts they linger on to say goodbye. No one wishes to go 
first, for perhaps this will be the last time they will have Miss Belvin with them, 
but — * * * Surely this is not the English room; and where are the girls and 
Miss Belvin." 

So they wrote of her, those young students of hers. So their fresh 
lips drank trustingly of the cup she held to them, their eyes the while 
looking into the timid, steadfast eyes of their girl-teacher. The re 
membrance of this beautiful thing brings quick tears. 

Throughout her course at St. Mary's she was an ideal student, gifted 
and painstaking. The completeness and finished nicety of her wor!% 



14 The St. Mary's Muse. 

was a stimulus to her teachers, and to the girls this excellence came to 
be regarded as a sort of standard to which they approximated more 01 
less closely. To do as well as Nannie meant definitely just as much as 
figures on a card. This general power of mind was combined with a 
peculiar excellence of discrimination. The finely wrought elements, 
the delicate distinctions, the clean-cut edges of thought, the musical 
adjustment of things, these were the conditions that her mind found 
most attractive. A nice feeling for differences was the distinguishing 
quality of everything she did. 

She was at St. Mary's a good many years and in all that time she 
never disappointed anybody. Perhaps this was why we all loved her 
There were never times when it was necessary to rub out and start 
afresh. Her gentle loveliness and sweet considerateness kept our heart9 
always warm; she brought to our lives a sunny consciousness of affec- 
tionate reliability. Her gracious nature knew no distinction of indi- 
viduals ; to everybody, of whatever age or rank or ability, she was the 
same Nannie, full of deference and kindness. A delicate aloofness of 
spirit gave a gentle dignity to all her relations, and this produced an 
added earnestness in her friendships, only the more strong and helpful 
for this delicacy of involuntary reserve. 

It is with a jealous claim that St. Mary's lays her hand on this sweet 
and fine spirit and calls her daughter. The oak trees of the grove 
daily shed their influence upon her; the dignity of fine old buildings 
did not appeal in vain to her; the benediction of the Chapel strength- 
ened her pure heart; the loving atmosphere of the place encompassed 
her. And how well has she returned her daughter's due ! She has left 
us a memorial of beauty and truth. The memory of the nobility of her 
character, and the genuine sweetness of her nature, will be enshrined in 
our hearts forever. Imogen Stone. 



ST MARY'S NOTES. 



It is with regret that we announce the death of Mrs. J. A. Lockhart 
(Lina Ashe) of Wadesboro, a loyal and devoted Alumna of St. Mary's, 
which occurred early in January. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 15 

Recent marriages of Raleigh Alunrnge are those of Margaret V. Hill 
and Dr. William Charles Schroeder, of Portsmouth, December 28th, and 
of Frances Burton Hoke to Mr. William D. Pollock, of Kinston, Janu- 
ary 11th. 

The Chapel has presented a most attractive appearance during the 
Epiphany season, the effective decorations, chief among them the illumi- 
nated Epiphany star giving added charm to the services. St. Ethel- 
dreda's Chapter has presented a handsome credence table of oak and 
brass which is a decided addition to the chancel furnishings. Numer- 
ous other additions are contemplated. There was a special Communion 
Service in the Chapel on Epiphany at 11 o'clock. 

Among recent Alumna? visitors have been Mrs. Stephen C. Bragaw 
(Maude Amyett), who is in Raleigh with her husband, the Senator 
from Beaufort, and Mrs. William Roulhac (Nannie Broadnax), of 
Rockingham County. Mrs. Roulhac was accompanied by her father, 
probably the only survivor of the students of the boy's school, which 
occupied the site on which St. Mary's now stands. Mr. Broadnax was 
much interested in noting the changes in the Rock Houses and grounds 
wich which he was so intimately acquainted in his boyhood. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss not ours. 



North Carolina's Leading Dry Goods Store. 

Dobbin & Ferrall 

(At Tucker's Store.) 
123 and 125 Fayetteville Street. 



Perfectly equipped mail order service. Cor- 
respondence solicited. 



"We prepay postage, express or freight charge 

anywhere in North Carolina on all cash 

mail orders amounting to $5.00 

or more. 

DOBBIN & FERRALL. 



Established 1858. 

H. MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA. 

BOYLAN, PEARGE & CO. 



Dry Goods, Millinery, 
Tailored Costumes, 
Gloves, Hosiery, 
Handkerchiefs, 
Underwear, 
Fancy Goods. 



Mail orders filled intelligently and promptly. 



FAYETTEVIIiLK AND SALISBURY STS. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



• Send to. 



ALFRED WILLIAMS & CO., 



RALEIGH. N. C. 



BOOKS, 



OF ALL KINDS. 



Select line of STATIONERY. 

Eastman's Kodaks and sup- 
plies. Office supplies. 



HAVE.... 

WHARTON 

TO MAKE YOUR 

PHOTOGRAPHS 

Remember it PAYS to get the BEST. 

HART-WARD HARDWARE COMPANY, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Best of everything in Hardware. Satisfaction 

guaranteed or money refunded. All-right 

Cook Stoves, Celebrated Warm Air 

Heaters, the only perfect heater 

made. Write for prices. 

SHERWOOD HIGGS & CO. 

Every thins in 

DRY GOODS 



RALEIGH, 



NORTH CAROLINA 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



W. G. STRONAGH'S SONS GO., 

GROCERS 


M. Rosenthal & Company 

GROCERS 


215 FATETTEVILLE STREET. 




136 FAYETTEVILLE STREET. 


KING'S GROCERY. 

"The Little Store." 


Good things always at 

BRETSCH'S BAKERY. 


FOR QTJICK COOKING 
nothing 1 exceeds the 

GAS RANGE. 

Always ready. No dirt or ashes. 

FOR LIGHT 

Use the Best: THE WELSBACH LIGHT 

STANDARD GAS AND ELECTRIC CO., 


Buy ROYSTER'S Fine Candies. 

Fine Sporting Goods. 

SINGER SEWING MACHINE, 

180 Fayetteville Street. 

SALVERTORE DESIO, 

Manufacturing' Jeweler and Silversmith. 

1012 F. St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

On application will send any article selected. 
To St. Mary's, discount of ten per cent. 


124 EAYETTEVILLE ST. 


THE J. D RIGGAN COMPANY, 

Holiday Goods. 


JNO. P. HAYES, Photographer. 

Kodak work of all kinds. 


WEATHERS & UTLEY, 

Art Dealers. 


Don't forget to buy your Shoes of 

POOLE & ALLEN'S Shoe Store. 


MISSES REESE & COMPANY, 

Millinery. 

CALIFORNIA FRUIT STORE. 

Fruit and Confections. 


KING'S UP-TO-DATE DRUG STORE 


AND SODA FOUNTAIN. 
Corner Fayetteville and Hargett Streets. 


ANTICEPHALALGINE cures quickly and 
safely Headache in all its forms. 


JOLLY & WYNNE JEWELRY COMPANY 


You'll And up-to-date Shoes at 

HUNTER BROS. & BREWER. 


Wedding and Holiday presents. 
Fine Watch and Jewelry repairing. 






ELLINGTON'S ART STORE, 

Raleigh. N C 
Everything in Art." 
Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs. 


CROWELUS 
DRUG STORE. 

120 Fayetteville Street. 


Private Dining and Banquet Halls at 

GIERSCH'S, 2 16 Fayetteville St. 


For the most satisfactory work, 

Try RIGGSBEE at 
Watson & Co's., Gallery. PHOTOGRAPHS. 


THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS, Raleigh, N. C— 
Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 


T W. BLAKE. 

Rich Jewelry and Silverware. 
Repairing promptly done. 




DARNELL & THOMAS, 
Pianos and Organs. 
Sheet music and small goods. 
Raleigh, N. C 


PERRY & ROSENTHAL, Trust Bldg. 
Ladies' Fine Shoes. 




Remember DUGHI. 


Dr. V. E. TUBNtK, 
Dentist. 



ylinas. 
Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 

St. Mary's School, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

!lv>'H: ^H (for cjir Is and young women). 



03d ANNUAL SESSION BEGAN SEPTEMBER 15, 1904. 



SESSION DIVIDED .INTO TWO TERMS. 

E ASTER TERM BEGINS JANUARY 26, 1905. 



1. THE COLLEGE. 

w % THE MUSIC SCHOOL, 

offer. ir^ru^U these < 3- THE BUSINESS SCHOOL. 

Department*: j j THE ART SCHOOL. 

5. THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL. 



In 1903-4 were enrolled 241 students from 17 Dioceses. 

Twenty-five Members in the Faculty. 



Wsll Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New. Twenty-eight 
Pianos- New C •flickering Grand Piano Just Added. 

Special attention to the. Social and Christian Side of Education unthout slight 
to the scholastic training. £%i : Ji*z$ Sfei*P*l&^ 

I ■i c -- For Catalogue and other inf&jc&0tiflti addre«9r^&*:$^. 

Rev. McNeely IkiBqse, B. S., B. D., 

RECTOR. 



yefcruar^ 1905 



* 



ftbe 



St* flftaty's flfouse 



H 



IRalefeb, 1R. C. 



1 






The St. Mary's Muse, 

VALENTINE NUMBER. 



Vol. IX. February, 1905. No. 7. 



Progress in Valentines. 



I. 

To the boy it seemed to say 

All that tongue or pen could tell, 
And so it went on Valentine's day 

To the tiny Miss whom it suited well. 
'Twas "Roses are red and violets blue, 

Sugar is sweet and so are you." 

II. 

But now the youth such things disdains. 

No longer would a bought rhyme do. 
But he must tax his own bright brains, 

To write a Valentine for Sue. 
This one began. "Thy beauty fair," 

And then told all about her eyes, 
And how her graces did ensnare 

Alike the wealthy and the wise. 

III. 

The next time Cupid's day came round, 

It found a man where it left a youth; 
To him Valentine had an empty sound, 

He wanted an answer to his forsooth. 
Then what he wrote we'll have to guess, 

But the answer we know — the answer was, — "Yes." 

M. R. DuB.. '05. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



"A Valentine in Lavender and Old Lace." 



"Talking about Valentine Day, why you reckon Miss Louisa Wills 
ain't never married \ Seems like most any man would be glad to come 
into such a nice house — and so much grass and spring water, too!" 

"She must have had a lover who was killed in the war, most old maids 
have, you know," suggested sentimental Lucie as she rounded off a flam- 
ing red heart." 

"No, she don't look like nobody what's been disappointed in love — 
she never married cause she never had a chance," Mrs. Bradford, who, 
everybody knew, had oft repented having entered the matrimonial lists, 
convincingly remarked. 

They were just finishing up the decorations for a Valentine party 
which was- to be given to get the parson a new suit of clothes, and Lucie 
while critically surveying the effect had a sudden inspiration. She 
gave two or three whirls, grabbed her hat and started on a run to Miss 
Louisa's. JSTot even waiting to knock, she burst into the room crying 
breathlessly — "Oh, Miss Louisa, you just must come to the Valentine 
party at Hicks' to-night. IsTo, you have got to say yes, for I've worked 
so hard and — you know you ought to help buy the parson his suit of 
clothes. Now, won't you come ?" 

Miss Louisa shook her head and smiling sadly said, "No, dear, I'll 
give you the money, but I'd rather not go." 

"]STow, Miss Louisa, just to please me. Won't you go for this once ?" 
she pleaded. 

"But what have I to wear, child ?" "0!h, wear that beautiful laven- 
der dress of your mother's, with the real lace and the amethysts, and 'do' 
your hair low on your neck. You'll go, won't you, Miss Louisa ?" 

"Well, dear, if it will give you any pleasure, I will go, but, you 
know," she said smilingly, " it's been so long since I've been anywhere 
you will have to show me how to behave." 

I knew you would do it, you angel," Lucie said, as she gave her a 
school-girl hug." "Be ready, I'll be by for you at eight," and she was 






gone. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Miss Louisa watched her from the window until she had disappeared 
down the hill and then, sighing, she turned to get the keys to the cedar 
chest, saying half-aloud, "I wonder why the child is so anxious for me 
to go to-night — a mere fancy of hers, no doubt." 

When Miss Louisa with Lucie that night entered the crowded room, 
the village folks who had never seen her except when tending the sick 
clad in a severe black dress, and with her hair brought tightly back, 
opened their mouths in surprise and admiration at the wonderful trans- 
formation. 

"Surely that ain't Miss Louisa Wills, who never was known to. come 
to a sociable or to wear anything but black," whispered one. "Ain't 
she got pretty white hair, though ; and that lilac dress, just seems to show 
off her eyes," said another. 

Lucie bore her triumphantly through the crowd to a seat where they 
were soon the centre of an admiring group. 

When time came to leave, Lucie held a box in which were little slips 
with the names of all the girls on them, and as the boys passed by, each 
one drew out a slip on which was written the name of the girl he must 
take home — his Valentine for the year. When the Parson laughingly 
put in his hand to draw, Lucie slipped into his palm a little piece of 
paper. 

"Read it, child, I can't find my glasses," and, standing on tip-toes, 
Lucie whispered : 



"Miss Louisa Wills" 

You are mine, I am thine. — 

Let us form one sweet Valentine." 

On the way home the Parson was very quiet and when they reached 
the door he handed Miss Louisa the slip Lucie had given him. 
"Read it," he said, "and see if you can't consider the matter." 

Bettie Woolf, '06. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Maybe It Didn't. 



They were all sitting around the dining-room table — Mother, Father, 
Uncle, and little three-year-old Helen — and on all their faces was the 
most expectant air. Then, "Oh, Muvver, I heard somefin'," and Mother 
thinks sihe heard something, too, and takes her small daughter to the 
parlor door. 

One silent instant, then Mother throws the door open, and catches a 
glimpse of a fleeing black skirt and white apron-strings. 

"Muvver, Muvver, shee what I'se dot!" and Helen waves a large white 
envelope. 

"Oh, my little pet! Let's see if we can't find who put it there," 
Mother answers, for Mother knows something about this mystery. 

Silently, hand in hand, the two tip-toe down the front steps, then 
peep cautiously over the banisters, but no one is there. 

"Hush," in a loud whisper comes from behind the gate-post, "Mammy, 
don't tell where I am." 

"No leel' Mass, I won't," comes from behind the other post. 

Then little Helen knows something, too, and she creeps up to the 
gate, then jumps out with a "Boo !" and there sits Tom. 

"Muvver, o-o-h," and Helen is so bashful that she hides her face, on 
Mother's shoulder and can't even look at Thomas any more. 

And Thomas is so bashful that nurse has to take him "straight home." 

What do you suppose ? All this happened the next night of St. Valen- 
tine, and the next, and many nexts, only after a long time, Thomas did 
not go "straight home," and maybe later all this stopped happening, 
and — maybe it didn't. S. M. J., '05. 



The Reception to the Legislature. 



On Wednesday evening, February first, the Rector and faculty of St. 
Mary's gave a reception and Faculty Recital complimentary to the Gov- 
ernor and State officers, the Judges of the Supreme Court, and the mem- 
bers of the Legislature of North Carolina. 

The guests assembled in the parlor where the following musical and 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



elocutionary program was rendered. Each number was artistically 
done and received emphatic encores. 

"Scherzetto" Pabst 

St. Mary's Orchestra. 

•'Boots" — Reading. 

Miss Balfour. 

"Polonaise" for Piano MacDowell 

Miss Pixley. 

"When the Heart is Young"— Song Buck 

Miss Sanborn. 

Concerto— op. 60, for Violin Mendelssohn 

"Andante" 

"Allegro" 

Miss Hull. 

(Miss Pixley at the Piano.) 

Recitative and Aria from "Der Freischuetz" Von Weber 

Mrs. Sanborn. 

Chamber Scene from Hall Caine's "Christian" — Reading. 

Miss Balfour. 

"Tarantella" for Piano Raff 

Miss Pixley and Miss Dowd. 

After the recital the guests were escorted by the ushers to the Art 
Building, which was tastefully decorated with palms and azaleas. They 
were welcomed in the Library by the receiving party, which consisted 
of the Rector and Mrs. DuBose, the Bishop and Mrs. Cheshire, Mrs. 
Lyman, Mrs. Iredell, Mr. Chas. E. Johnson, Rev. Dr. I. McK. Pitten- 
ger, Dr. and Mrs. Kemp Battle, and Mile. Gerber. 

Simple refreshments — fruit punch and wafers — were served in the 
Director's Room, under the direction of Mrs. Seay, Miss Jones and Miss 
Chittenden. 

The general arrangements for the entertainment were in charge of a 
faculty committee, Mr. Stone, Miss Shipp and Miss McKimmon, while 
the decoration committee, Misses Jones, Sutton and Bowen, deserve the 
credit for the effective decorations. M. E. R. 



6 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Social News. 



(From the News and Observer of February 27th.) 

SECOND SENIOR RECEPTION. 

Miss Bessie Poe Law delightfully entertained her Senior Class of St. 
Mary's yesterday afternoon from four to six, at her home on McDowell 
street. Interesting questions about Cupid formed the game of the 
evening. The prize was awarded to Miss Mary Rossell, while the consoc- 
iation fell to Miss Florence Grant, and the booby, a toy drum., was 
awarded to Miss Margaret Jones. 

The house was beautifully decorated with the class colors, and the 
St. Mary's blue and white. Delicious refreshments were served in 
courses. 

The guests included Misses A. Clark, R. Clark, DuBose, Evans, Fair- 
ley, Gibson, Grant, Hughson, Jenkins, Long, Rossell, and Tillinghast 
of the class of '05, Miss McKimmon, the honorary member of the class, 
Miss Jones of the St. Mary's faculty, Miss Webster of Georgia, and 
Miss Boyden of Salisbury. 

The class of 1905 comprises a charming group of young ladies drawn 
from widely separated sections, and bids fair to reflect added lustre on 
its beloved Alma Mater. 



JUNIOR RECEPTION. 

In accordance with the St. Mary's custom for the Juniors annually to 
do honor to the Seniors in a social function, on the twenty-eighth of 
January, the class of 1906 gave a beautiful reception complimentary to 
the members and associate members of the class of 1905. 

The reception was held in the Latin Room, which skillful hands had 
made extremely attractive with decorations of evergreens. The feat- 
ure of the evening was a "Mother Goose Party," consisting first of the 
illustrating of familiar rhymes and then the guessing of the rhymes from 
the pictures. This aroused much enthusiasm and waisi decidedly enjoya- 
ble. The first prize, a book, was won by Anna Clark, and the booby, a 
Mother Goose book, was given to Mrs. DuBose. 

Delicious refreshments — nut syllabub, champagne wafers and bon- 
bons — were served. R. H. C. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



(From the News and Observer of January 27th.) 

A KAPPA DELTA DIXXER PARTY. 

Miss Emmie Drewry gave an elaborate dinner party to twelve of her 
schoolmates of St. Mary's School yesterday afternoon at her home on 
East Hargett street. 

Those present are members of the Kappa Delta sorority of St. Mary's 
and the gathering was one of pretty girls who work together in the class- 
room and who 1 have come to' love and depend largely upon each other for 
their daily happiness. It was a most delightful affair. Twelve school- 
girls full of life and love, gentle and generous to a fault, met to spend a 
few hours in mirth and fun. 

The home was beautifully decorated and everything was in perfect 
keeping with the occasion. The menu which was most elaborate, includ- 
ing all the delicacies of the season, was served in courses. The table 
was a dream of beauty. It was tastefully decorated with flowers and 
smilax and in the centre was a pyramid of bride's roses. On the table 
silver candelabras burned softly, effecting a most pleasing color scheme. 

The guests were Misses Winston of Durham, Spruill of Louisburg, 
Springs and B. Springs of Charlotte, Webb of Hillsboro, Gibson of 
Concord, Prince of Wilmington, Sharpe of Edenton, Boylan of Kaleigh, 
Woolf of Alabama, and the faculty member of the sorority, Miss Hull, 
of Chicago. 



School Notes. 



Carrie Claytor has returned to her home in Durham. 
Alice Spruill spent two or three days at her home in Louisburg the 
first of February. 

Mattie Hunter went to Xorfolk the last of January to see Parsifal 
and to hear Paderewski. 

Cora Hunt has gone to her home in Kittrell to be with her father who 
is ill. We hope he will soon be better, so that she can return. 

During the absence of Mr. DuBose in Charlotte on Sunday, February 
5th, Mr. Hunter of St. Augustine's School held service at St. Mary's, a 
courtesy which was greatly appreciated. 



8 The St. Mary's Muse. 

We are glad to welcome Miss Walton back to St. Mary's. Her sister 
was so much improved by iJhe first of February that Miss Walton was 
able to leave her in Morganton and return to her duties in charge of the 
Infirmary. 

Mamie Wilcox and Christine Richards returned to their homes in 
Florida, and Frances Broadfoot to Fayetteville, at the end of the Advent 
Term, much to the regret of their friends. We trust that their health 
will soon be better. 

Miss Jarvis, the head of the Junior Auxiliary in Connecticut, ad- 
dressed the Juniors at St. Mary's Sunday evening, February fifth. 
Her talk about the missionaries in Alaska, and the work of her Juniors 
in Connecticut, was. very interesting and highly appreciated. 

Mr. Edward Baxter Perry, the widely known pianist, ever a welcome 
friend, made his annual visit here on the evening of January twenty- 
fifth. His lecture-recitals are always a treat, for his explanation and 
interpretation of his numbers gives the girls much help to the right ap- 
preciation of the music. 



Jo^eiets. 



I. Clark. — "She has a pennant from one of those sororities at Chapel 
Hill. 

M. Eossell. — "I like unanimous presents, because you do not know 
whom to thank for them. 

D. Hughson. — "Isn't the whip-poor-will the bird that says 'Bob- 
white' ?" 

Teacher (in Latin Class) : "What is the construction of 'sit'?" 
Voice (back row) : "Ablative of place." — Ex. 

Johnny in reading class — "See the horse runnin'." 

Teacher — "Don't forget the 'g.' " 

Johnny — "Gee, see the horse runnin'." — Ex. 

Boy — "I wish a lion would eat me up." 
Mother— "Why, Johnnie ?" 

Boy — "Oh, it would be such a joke on the lion. When he thought I 
was in his stomach I would be in heaven. — Ex. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

Subscription, One Year. = = = = One Dollar. 

Single Copies, = = = = = Fifteen Cents. 



A Magazine published monthly except in EDITORIAL STAFF 

July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh, Anna B. Clark _ .. Editor in Chief. 

S. C, in the interest of the students and Margaret DuBose ^ I iterarv Editors 

Alumnae, under the editorial management of Sadie M. Jenkins / - ' 

the Senior Class. -Ida P. Evans Social Editor. 

Address all communications and send all Linda Tillin°-hastII~I~~ j" Local Editors, 
subscriptions to Rena H- c i ar jj; Exchange Editor. 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, Effle C. Fairley— ) 

Florence Grant -Associate Editors. 

kaleigh, n. c. Mossie Long J 

Mary E. Rossell Business Manager. 

Ellen P. Gibson \ Editors on Ads 

correspondence from friends solicited. Dorothy M. Hughson j 

Application made at the post-office at Raleigh, for admission to the mail as second-class matter. 



Editorial. 



After the tax of the examinations the minds of the editors feel too 
much in need of a rest to enable them to write long editorials. It is 
now almost a time of relaxation, a go-between time. But the days and 
weeks are being fast claimed so that all social and strenuous duties may 
be performed before the quiet Lenten season begins. 

Already suggestions for Commencement and graduation are being 
heard, the work on the annual is being pushed by the board of editors, 
plans for the summer even are whispered about. After all when we 
seriously consider what is being done, and what is to be done, perhaps 
there is not any real a;o-between time at St. Mary's. 



As the spring approaches the girls begin again to feel revived 
interest in the development of out-door sports. There is no reason 
why we should not have an active tennis club as a permanent 
feature at St. Mary's, with an annual tournament as one of the features 
of the school life, and basket-ball can be made both highly enjoyable and 
very invigorating. Our tournament last year was not what it might 
have been, and neither Alphas nor Betas played as much for glory on 
the basket-ball field as for fun. !N"ow is the time to do better. 



10 The St. Mary's Muse. 

The enthusiasm is aroused. Let vis keep it up and take as much interest 
in our field-day contests as we already feel in the annual inter-society 
debates. 

The meeting held on the afternoon of February 10th ; at wihich Jean 
Carson and Ellen Gibson were chosen to head sister athletic organiza- 
tions in friendly rivalry, is a step in the right direction. We shall be 
glad to see this meeting lead to real results, and believe that the push of 
the chosen leaders will ensure this. 



We hear more or less criticism of the Muse as lacking sufficient liter- 
ary interest. We have no wish to apologize for the paper as there is a 
distinct purpose in its publication and the Editors are attempting as 
best they can to carry out that purpose, but we think it well to speak a 
word that may correct a misapprehension on the part of some who still 
misunderstand. 

The Muse,, unlike many other school papers, is not intended in any 
sense to be a literary magazine. While it is the aim each month to print 
seine literary matter, this matter is only meant as a reflection of one 
phase of the school life. Timely articles, school stories, pungent jokes, 
happy verse, all add very materially to' the interest of any publication, 
but the Muse is distinctly the newspaper of St. Mary's — meant, first 
and foremost, to' carry to its readers an account of the life of St. Mary's 
and the work of the school, and items of news relating to those who are 
or have been connected with the school and so in whom the school and its 
friends are interested. If we are truly interested in a, subject very 
frequently a ten-line item is of more moment to us than a twenty-page 
magazine. Only a few are presumed to be interested in every item in 
the Muse. We aim to> give each month some things which will interest 
each one whom the Muse, reaches. When we fail in that we are very 
glad to be told of the failure. 



The Exchange Editor is glad to acknowledge the receipt of the Janu- 
ary numbers of the following exchanges: 

Georgia Tech, Wake Forest Student, Ivy, Red and White, Gunston Echo, Boys' 
Industrial School Advance, Normal School Magazine, Blue and Gray, Washing- 
ton Collegian, Glemson College Chronicle, The Oracle, and others. 



ALUMNAE MATTER 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 



President, - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

[Mrs. M. T. Leak, Durham. 
Virn-PRifSTmfNW 1 Mrs - 1 M - Pi"enger, Raleigh, 

VICE-.FRESIDErsTS, j Mrg p p Tucker Ra l eigh) 

[Mrs.Kate de R Meares, Wilmington. 
Sec-Treas., - Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 



A Visit to Charlotte. 



In the absence of the Rector of St. Peter's — the Rev. Harris Mallinc- 
krodt — Mr. DuBose visited Charlotte on February 4, 5, 6, preaching 
on Sunday and speaking' for, and visiting in behalf of, St. Mary's. The 
weather was very bad and many persons were unable to get out to 
church and to the gathering on Monday, but in ,spite of the elements a 
very successful meeting of the Alumnae was held in the house of Mrs. 
Brevard on Monday at noon, when the St. Mary's Guild was re-organ- 
ized with the following officers : Mrs. Frank Wilkes, President ; Miss 
Caro Brevard, Secretary and Treasurer, and Mrs. Clement Dowd, Jr., 
Correspondent. 

Mr. DuBose spoke to the ladies about the condition and needs of St. 
Mary's, and of the improvements in the new Infirmary and enlarged 
Chapel, and invited one and all to come to St. Mary's and see if they 
did not approve of, and rejoice at, what the Alumnae had done. Mr. 
DuBose asked for no money at this meeting, but distributed copies of 
the Muse and urged that the first work of the Guild be the getting of 
subscribers. Every St. Mary's girl and every friend of St. Mary's 
should subscribe to the Muse and so be in close touch with the school and 
her work through the ten copies of the paper issued each year. 

Among the many pleasant visits made by Mr. DuBose to the Alumnae 
in Charlotte he reports two particularly noticeable ones. One of these 
was to Mrs. R. A. Evans, who was a pupil at St. Mary's for two years 
in the early forties, and who as Miss Washington is one of the four girls 
in the "Confirmation by Bishop Ives" which hangs in the St. Mary's 



12 The St. Mary's Muse. 

parlor ; and the other to Mrs. Sarah Young, who was at St. Mary's at the 
same time with Mrs. Evans. St. Mary's has hut three pupils from 
Charlotte this year, hut she is hoping for three times that number next 
September, and Charlotte with her more than twenty resident Alumnae, 
should give us a dozen girls each year. 

Charlotte is a charming place, and St. Peter's parish and the many 
missions in and about Charlotte are all active and progressive, and as 
they come to know St. Mary's better as their church school the girls will 
come in flocks. 



The Enlarged Chapel. 



The enlarged chapel, though still lacking the thirty new seats, which 
we hope to* have in place' by the end of this month, is a joy to 1 the Rector 
and to all the members of St. Mary's, and with the Epiphany decora- 
tions and star is a beautiful and dignified church, worthy of any con- 
gregation. 

The old altar and lectern are still used, and the communion rail, 
though made of oak to correspond with the oak floor, has the handsome 
standards and the memorial plate of the old rail. As yet there are no 
fald-stool or stalls for the Rector or clergy, and no litany desk or choir 
stalls, but it is hoped that these pieces will soon be given by friends or 
Alumnae of St. Mary's, and the Rector will be glad to hear from any 
one on the subject. 

In October Rev. Dr. Gordon of Camden, S. C, presented a handsome 
lectern Bible in memory of his sister, a former pupil of St. Mary's, and 
in November St. Etheldred's Chapter of the Junior Auxiliary gave a 
handsome credence table of oak and brass. Two memorial windows are 
under construction, some memorial lights have been promised, and a 
friend has offered ten dollars to start a fund for candles for the altar. 

The Rector has furnished the following list of articles needed in the 
Chapel, with approximate prices, the final acceptance, of course, being 
in the hands of the Trustees: Altar and reredos, $250 to $350; altar, 
$100 to $200; pulpit, $100 to $250; clergy-stalls, $60 to $100; fald- 
stool or litany-desk, $30 to $150; choir-stalls (six), $150 to $250 (all 
furniture of oak to harmonize with the Chapel finishing) ; windows, $75 
to $250. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 13 



St. Mary's Guild, Charlotte. 



MRS. CLEMENT DOWD, CORRESPONDENT. 

Charlotte K C, Feb. 8, 1905. 

The Rector of St. Mary's informally addressed a number of old St. 
Mary's girls at the residence of Mrs. R. J. Brevard, on South Tryon 
street, February 6th. The real object of the meeting was to re-organize 
the St. Mary's Guild, which body did admirable work until several 
years ago, when the President, Mrs. Lucien Walker (Annie Jones), 
moved to Roanoke, Va. Of course, it was impossible to settle to work 
until the. Rector was questioned on all sides concerning the friends at 
St. Mary's, especially Miss Katie and Miss Dowd, and a number of 
incidents in the old school days at St. Mary's were discussed. An inter- 
esting topic of conversation was the beloved Chapel, and though some 
of the Alumnae present reluctantly agreed with the Rector that the en- 
largement of the building added much to its beauty and convenience, a 
few refused to become reconciled to any changes. However, a new St. 
Mary's Guild was organized with the following members : President, 
Mrs. J. Frank Wilkes (Fannie Mclver Lucas) ; Secretary and Treas- 
urer, Miss Caro Brevard ; Corresponding Secretary, Mrs. Clement Dowd 
(Frances Tunstall) ; Mrs. W. R. Taliaferro (Dadie Lippitt; Mrs. 
Lockwood Jones (Rosalie Wilkes), Mrs. R. J. Brevard; Misses Florence 
Thomas and Virginia Bland. Owing to the inclement weather only 
seven were present, but at the next meeting we hope to have the ladies 
named, who are old St. Mary's girls, residing in Charlotte: Mesdames 
S. V. Young (Sarah Virginia Burton), Margaret Davis (Margaret 
Jones Brewster), Heriot Clarkson (Mamie Osborne), John Watters 
(Kate Lord), R, A. Evans (Laura Washington), Thomas Haughton 
(Ella Andrews), W. E. Stitt (Lina Battle), E. W. Mooring (Mattie 
Helper), J. S. Myers (Mamie Rawlinson), J. F. Yorke (Fannie 
Rogers), F. O. Landis (Carrie May Dockery), and Misses Josephine 
Osborne, Alice and Janie Haughton, Maud Holt and Norma VanLand- 
ingham. ]? T. D. 



14 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Alumnae Notes. 



Mary Hunter, '03, is visiting Isabel Brumby, '04, in Florida. 

On February ninth at St, Paul's, Edenton, Miss Alice Lyman Makely 
was married to Dr. Henry M. S, Oaison of Edenton, ]ST. 0. Miss Makely 
was a St. Mary's girl during 1897-1899, and has our best wishes. Sue 
Clark of Tarboro, another old St. Mary's girl, was one of her brides- 
maids. 

In the death of Miss Rowena Hines, St. Mary's loses a friend who 
has been devoted to all her interests since the early days of the school. 
Though never herself a. member of the school, Miss Hines was closely 
associated with the family of the founder, and in recent years has 
always counted it a privilege to be enrolled as an honorary member of the 
school Alumnae Association. After a, long and useful life she passed 
away at the home of her brother, Dr. P. E. Hines, in Ealeigh, on the 
morning of January 25th, in the eightieth year of her age. 

Many are the daughters of St. Mary's, and few months slip by with- 
out one or more of them 1 as a happy bride entering upon greater responsi- 
bilities, but not so frequent are the weddings in which St. Mary's claims 
the man. Such, however, is the case in the Snow-Stronach wedding of 
January 25th, when Mr. William Snow was married to Miss Alice 
Stronaclh. Both of the contracting parties are native Raleighites, and 
Master William solved the mysteries of his first books under the guid- 
ance of Miss Kate McKimmon, who still directs the Primary Depart- 
ment at St, Mary's. We extend congratulations to Mr. and Mrs. Snow. 



Illness of Prof. Jeudwine. 



The numerous friends of Prof. J. W. Jeudwine are greatly distressed 
at the news of his serious illness at his home in Washington. He was 
suddenly stricken with apoplexy on the morning of February 6, and 
though he partly rallied from the stroke and his speech is not affected, 
paralysis has. disabled his left side, and he is critically ill. 

Mr. Jeudwine was from 1900 to 1902 Director of Music at St. Mary's, 
where he made a lasting impression and was very popular. His co- 



The St. Mary's Muse. 15 



workers, both in and out of his department, felt his presence and energy 
an inspiration and a constant impulse to higher and better things. He 
is a most enthusiastic and energetic worker and his present illness is 
doubtless traceable to his unflagging zeal and devotion to the work which 
crowded upon him. 

Since leaving St. Mary's, ais President of the Southern Music Associa- 
tion, Mr. Jeudwine has been a leading factor in the successful develop- 
ment of that organization. He has also been teaching and writing on 
various musical subjects. 

St. Mary's extends deep sympathy to Mr. and Mrs. Jeudwine and 
trusts that Mr. Jeudwine will be entirely restored to live on his life 
of usefulness. 



Osborne-Bryan. 



It was a large interest that St. Mary's felt in the wedding in Christ 
Church, Raleigh, on Wednesday afternoon, February 8th, of Miss 
Mary Winder Bryan of Raleigh to Rev. Francis Moore Osborne of 
Charlotte. 

The groom, a "Sewanee man," is the son of Yen. E. A. Osborne, 
Archdeacon of the Convocation of Charlotte, while the bride, a daughter 
of the Winders and the Bryans of Carolina, spent a portion of her school 
days at St. Mary's. 

To quote the Raleigh papers of the 9th, "while the world without was 
dark and threatening the interior of Christ Church presented a scene of 
brightness and solemn beauty. It was one of the most beautiful wed- 
dings ever seen in Raleigh. Both the young people have many warm 
friends, who were met together to rejoice in their happiness and to wish 
them god-speed upon their new journey." And Muse readers like to 
know further that "the bride was very lovely in a dress of white crepe- 
de-chine over white satin, with pearl ornaments and a shower bouquet 
of lilies-of-the-valley. The bridesmaids w-ore dresses of accordion 
plaited white silk mulle, with bouquets of white carnations and aspara- 
gus ferns. The maids of honor carried pink roses." 

Four of the attendants were old St. Mary's girls — Misses Anita De- 
Rosset of Wilmington, Octavia Hughes of New Bern, Josephine Os- 
borne of Charlotte, and Sarah Cheshire of Raleigh. 



16 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Official Notices. 



TO THE ALUMNAE. 

It is the purpose of the Rector as time and work permit to' visit the 
cities and towns of the Carolinas and to organize (or revive) the 
Alumnae into St. Mary's Guilds. 

The purpose of these Guilds will not be simply to raise funds (though 
money is always needed at St. Mary's), but to create and maintain inter- 
est in the school and to keep- the Rector in touch with the girls who have 
been and all the girls, who should become pupils of the school. 

The first step in the accomplishment of this work the Rector feels 
should be made by adding to the circulation of the Muse by subscribing, 
and encouraging others to subscribe; and the second, by sending each 
month to the paper some short item, article, or suggestion, to make the 
paper better and more' interesting. 

The Muse is the school organ, and the Alumnae organ. The matter 
for the Muse comes under three heads, — that furnished by or through 
the Rector, as official news from the school intended to inform the 
Alumnae, patrons and friends of the school of its progress and needs, 
and to give any important information concerning the work of the 
school; that furnished by the pupils of St. Mary's through the Senior 
Class, and intended to reflect the present day life of the school; last, 
but by no means least, that concerning the Alumnae, meant to keep the 
Alumnae in closer touch with the school and with each other. This last 
can only well be achieved by messages froni the Alumnae on the outside 
tb the school, as well as from those in the school to those outside. 

The Rector wishes to bespeak, through this article, more general co- 
operation of the Alumnae with the school through the Muse, and to ask 
those who will, to subscribe, and to write to the Muse, or to him direct 
with any news and suggestions, either as individuals or through the cor- 
respondents of the different Guilds. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



17 



SCHOOL PROGRAM. 

February-March, 1905. 

Feb. 13. 9.00 p. m. — Alpha Kappa Psi Banquet. 

Feb. 18. S.15 p. m. — Pupil Recital; Miss Hunter and others. 

Feb. 22. Washington's Birthday : half-holiday. 

Feb. 25. 8.15 p. m. — Lecture: Prof. Edward Minims of Trinity 

College on "Browning;." 

March 4. 7.15 p. ni. — "Social Evening." 

8.00 p.m. — St. Catherine's Chapter Entertainment. 
March 6. 8.00 p. m. — Tan Delta German. 
March 8. Ash Wednesday — Holy day. 

Service, sermon and Holy Communion, 11.00. 
March 11. 8.15 p. m. — Lecture. 
March 18. 7.15 p. m. — "Social Evening." 

8.15 p.m. — Lecture: Dr. H. L. Smith, Davidson College. 



A Swarm of Bees Worth Hiving. 



B patient, B joyful, B modest, B mild, 

B wise as a Solon, B meek as a child, 

B studious, B thoughtful, B loving, B kind, 

B sure to make matter subservient to mind. 

B cautious, B prudent, B trustful, B true, 

B courteous to all men, B friendly with few; 

B temperate in argument, pleasure and wine; 

B careful of conduct, of mcnej^, of time. 

B cheerful, B grateful, B hopeful, B firm; 

B peaceful, benevolent, willing to learn; 

B courageous, B gentle, B liberal, B just; 

B aspiring, B humble, because thou art dust. 

B righteous, circumspect, sound in the faith; 

B active, devoted, B faithful till death; 

B honest, B holy, transparent, and pure; 

B dependent, B Saint-like, and you'll B secure. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss not ours. 



North Carolina's Leading Dry Goods Store. 

Dobbi n & Ferrall 

(At Tucker's Store.) 
123 and 125 Fayetteville Street. 



Perfectly equipped mail order service. Cor- 
respondence solicited. 



We prepay postage, express or freight charge 

anywhere in North Carolina on all cash 

mail orders amounting to 85.00 

or more. 

DOBBIN & FERRALL. 



Established 1858. 



H. MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA. 

BOYLAN, PEARCE & CO. 



Dry Goods, Millinery, 
Tailored Costumes, 
Gloves, Hosiery, 
Handkerchiefs, 
Underwear, 
Eancy Goods. 



Mail orders filled intelligently and promptly. 



FAYETTEVILLE AND SALISBURY STS. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



.Send to.. 



ALFRED WILLIAMS & CO., 



RALEIGH, N. C. 



BOOKS, 

OF ALL KINDS. 

Select line of STATIONERY. 

Eastman's Kodaks and sup= 
plies. Office supplies. 

HAVE.... 



TO MAKE YOUR 

PHOTOGRAPHS 

Remember it PAYS to gret the BEST. 

HART-WARD HARDWARE COMPANY, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Best of everything in Hardware. Satisfaction 

guaranteed or money refunded. All-right 

Cook Stoves, Celebrated Warm Air 

Heaters, the only perfect heater 

made. Write for prices. 



HIGGS & CO. 



Everything' in 



DRY GOODS 



RALEIGH, 



NORTH CAROLINA 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



W. C. STRONACHS SONS CO., | M. Rosenthal & Company 

GROCERS 

136 FATE 



KING'S GROCERY, 

"The Little Store." 



FOR QUICK COOKTNG 

nothing- exceeds the 

GAS RANGE. 

Always ready. No dirt or ashes. 

FOR LIGHT 

Use the Best: THE WELSBACH LIGHT 

STANDARD GAS AND ELECTRIC CO., 

124 FAYETTEVILLE ST. 



JNO. P. HAYES, Photographer 

Kodak work of all kinds. 

Don't forget to buy your Shoes of 

POOLE & ALLEN'S Shoe Store. 



Good things always at 

BRETSCH'S BAKERY. 

Buy ROYSTER'S Fine Candies. 

Fine Sporting Goods. 

SINGER SEWING MACHINE, 

180 Fayetteville Street. 

SAL VA TORE DESIO, 

Manufacturing- Jeweler and Silversmith. 

1012 F. St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

! On application will send any article selected. 
To St. Mary's, discount often per cent. 

THE J. D RIGGAN COMPANY, 

Holiday Goods. 



KING'S UP-TO-DATE DRUG STORE 

AND SODA FOUNTAIN. 
Corner Fayetteville and Hargett Streets. 



WEATHERS & TJTLEY, 

Art Dealers. 



You'll find up-to-date Shoes at 

HUNTEB BROS. & BREWER. 



MISSES REESE & COMPANY, 

Millinery. 

CALIFORNIA FRUIT STORE, 

Fruit and Confections. 

ANTICEPHALALGINE cures quickly and 
safely Headache in all its forms. 

JOLLY & WYNNE JEWELRY COMPANY 

Wedding and Holiday presents. 
Fine Watch and Jewelry repairing. 



ELLINGTON'S ART STORE, 
Raleigh N C 
Everything in Art.' 
Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs. 

Private Diniug and Banquet Halls at 

GlERSCfTS. 216 Fayetteville St. 

THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS, Raleigh, N. C— 
Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 

DARNELL & THOMAS. 
Pianos and Organs 
Sheet music and small K'oods. 
Raleigh, N. C 

Remember DUGHI. 



CROWE LL'S 
DRUG STORE. 



120 Fayetteville Street. 



For the most satisfactory work, 

Try RIGGSBEE at 
Watson & Co'a., Gallery. PHOTOGRAPHS. 

T. W. BLAKE. 

Rich Jewelry and Silverware. 
Repairing promptly done. 



PERRY & ROSENTHAL, Trust Bldg. 
Ladies' Fine Shoes. 



Da. V. E. TURNER, 
Dentist. 



Kation 



mas. 



■- 



Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 



St. Mary's School, 



RALEIGH, N. C. 



{for girls and young women). 



63d ANNUAL SESSION BEGAN SEPTEMBER 15, 1904. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGINS JANUARY 26, 1905. 



$t. Mary's 

offers instruction in these 
Departments ; 



1. THE COLLEGE. 

2. THE MUSIC SCHOOL. 

3. THE BUSINESS SCHOOL. 

4. THE ART SCHOOL. 

5. THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL. 



In 1903-4 were enrolled 241 students from 17 Dioceses. 

Twenty-five Members in the Faculty. 



Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment Hew. Twenty-eight 
'{£;.£. Pianos, /few Checkering Grand Piano Just Added. 

Special attention to the Social and Christian Side of Education toithovt 'sliglit 
to the scholastic training. M^&t, 



For Catalogue and other information address 



Rev. McXeely DuBose, B. S, B. £>., 

RECTOR. 



flDarcb, 1905 



$> 




1 





6 




* 



micigb, 1R. C. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

MID=YEAR NUMBER. 

Vol. IX. March, 1905. No. 8. 



Work- 

Let me but do my work from day to day. 

In field or forest, at the desk or loom, 

In roaring market-place or tranquil room ; 
Let me but find it in my heart to say, 
When vagrant wishes beckon me astray — 

"This is my work ; my blessing, not my doom : 

Of all who live, I am the one by whom 
This work can best be done, in the right way." 

Then shall I see it not too great, nor small, 

To suit my spirit and to prove my powers ; 

Then shall I cheerful greet the laboring hours, 
And cheerful turn, when the long shadows fall 
At eventide, to play and love and rest, 
Because I know for me my work is best. 

Henry Van Dyke : '"'The Three Best Things." 



A Darkey Monologue. 



•'Hit's de ole ship o' Zion, 
Hallelujah ! 
Hit's de ole ship o' Zion, 

Hallelujah ! 
She hab landed many — " 

"Lor, honey, hyak I is a bustirr my throat tryin' to sing yo' to sleep, 
an' yo' lookin' up at yo' Mammy jist as pert-like. I declah' to gracious, 
if yo' ain't de purtiest lil' gal to be a niggak, I eber did see. Yes, yo' 
is, honey, kase I hyard ole Missus say so de very first time you opened 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



dem big black eyes ob yourn. Lor, chile, hush dat cryin', ain't yo' 
neber gwine to> sleep?" 

"She hab landed many a thousan' 
An' she'll land a many mo — o' 
Glory, glory ! Hallelujah—" 

"Lor, Ephraim, what am yo' a standin' dah for, a-shiverin' and 
a-shakin' wid yo' eyes a-poppin' outen yo' head, like de ole "Patrollers" 
wiiz arter yo' ?" 

"War, you say? war? 

"Lor' have mercy on dis niggah — what am dem pesterin Yankees 
a gwine to do nex' ?" 

"Sot de niggahs free, yo' say ? What am dey gwine to do when dey 
is sot free? Dat's what I'm a-axin' yo' ! I'd jess like to know what 
you'd do turned outen dis, cabin widout ole Massa to take care ob yo'. 
Answer me dat, Ephraim ! 

"Git to shufflin' you scared niggah — yo' ! Don' yo' know de Yankees 
am a-gwine to fight our white folks, an' ain't we's bleeged fer to hep 
o]e Marsa some? Wake up dah, Elijah, an' yo' too, Jeremiah! Hyah, 
Break-o'-day, put on dat dress yo' lil' missy gib yo' Chris'mus. 
Ephraim, yo' git de gun hangin' up dah behin' de do', an' hed de per- 
cession. ]STow, is yo' all ready ? 

"When I counts three, ebery las' one ob yo' sing 1 — For-ard, march ! 

"Dixie Ian' am de Ian' ob cotton, 
Cinnamon seed, an' a sandy bottom, 
Look away — ." 

Fannie Hines Johnson. 



hfow a Little Sunbeam was Made Happy. 



"Why can I never be of any use to the world, but must shine day by 
day on this same bare, damp, gray wall ? If only I could make some 
plant grow and bloom, I would be happy. I do not understand why I 
was put here because I never do any one any good, and I am becom- 
ing more and more discontented all the time." Thus a little sunbeam 
was talking to himself. 

One day in the early spring a little maid while- sorting out her flower 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



seed, let fall a pansy seed on the wall where the sunbeam shone. He 
saw it and was glad. He determined to do all in his power to make the 
tiny seed take root and grow, so each day he would shine bright and 
warm, anxiously waiting to see some results from his persistent efforts. 
At length a little green sprout appeared, and then the sunbeam was 
happy. 

As the days grew warmer, the little plant, refreshed by the warm 
April showers, flourished and sent forth tiny leaves. Once there was 
a dreadful storm — that is, it seemed dreadful to the pansy, for the wind 
tossed and twisted her about, and she was lonely and miserable because 
her sunbeam had left her. However, when the clouds were scattered, 
the sunbeam came back again, cheering the heart of the pansy, but being 
sorry that the wind had treated her so cruelly. He did everything to 
make her comfortable, but it was several days before she became strong 
again. 

Soon the sunbeam noticed a little purple bud, shooting out from the 
plant. Then his joy knew no bounds, for wasn't this what he had been 
striving for through all these days? Each hour the bud became more 
and more matured, until, at last, one beautiful morning, it blossomed, 
and turned its smooth, velvety cheek to be kissed by the smiling sun- 
beam. E. C. F., '05. 



Our Social Life. 



AN EVENING OF PATRIOTISM. 

All the enthusiasm ever so characteristic of the daughters of the 
southland, and the visible evidence of the pride they feel in their coun- 
try and her heroes marked the welcome with which the girls of St. 
Mary's greeted General Fitzhugh Lee on the evening of the twentieth 
of February. 

The visit was an unexpected treat. General Lee came to Raleigh as 
President of the Jamestown Tercentennial Exposition to address the 
Legislature of North Carolina in behalf of the Exposition. While in 
town he was the guest of Col. Benehan Cameron at his residence oppo- 
site the school, and at nia-ht on the 20th, escorted by Col. Cameron and 
2 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



a party of friends, lie came over to St. Mary's for a little visit and to 
meet and greet the girls. All were assembled in the parlor to receive 
the distinguished guests, who were at once escorted by the Rector and 
Bishop Cheshire to the platform. Lieutenant-Governor Winston intro- 
duced Col. Cuningham, "a grandson of St. Mary's," who in a few words 
of eulogy presented General Lee. 

General Lee was fatigued and unwell, but spoke very entertainingly 
for twenty minutes in a patriotic vein. He urged the importance of 
good citizenship and a knowledge of the history of our fathers as an 
essential to good citizenship. He would have us never forget the right- 
eousness of the Confederate cause nor lose sight of the heroes who de- 
voted themselves to the cause of the Confederacy, and more than that, 
he would have us now realize that the land is one again, and do our 
part to make it one in spirit and in truth. 

After the address there was an informal reception characterized by 
enthusiasm and happiness; then all joined with heartiness in singing 
"Dixie" again and again, "The Old North State," etc., and the visitors 
withdrew. 

It was a most delightful evening, and will long linger in our memo- 
ries. 



ALPHA KAPPA PSI BANQUET. 

The Alpha Kappa Psi Sorority gave its annual banquet Monday 
night, February the thirteenth, at nine o'clock. Mr. Sanborn's music 
room was changed for the occasion into an attractive banquet hall by 
decorations of pictures, pennants, carnations and potted plants. The 
tables were arranged to form a triangle, the shape of the insignia of the 
order, and the gold of the sorority had a conspicuous place amid the 
color decorations. The place cards were valentines, and the souvenirs 
were gold watch fobs engraved with the initial letters of the sorority. 

Levin's orchestra furnished music for the evening, and the banquet 
was served by Dughi. The guests and hostesses were: Mrs. DuBose 
with Miss Checkley ; Daisy King with Margaret DuBose ; Annie Lamb 
with Margaret Eldridge ; Emily Garrison with Mary Villepigue ; Elmer 
George with Margaret Steadman ; Kate Glazebrook with Senah Critz ; 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Elise Emerson with Virgilia Glazebrook; Josephine Boylan with Mary 
Ella Moore; Isabel Ruff with Grace Wkitaker; Mamie Rossell with 
Ida Evans; Elizabeth Gartner with Kate Winslow; Mary Robinson 
with Florence Kidder; Helen Clark with Anna Clark; Jean Carson 
with Virginia Bailey; Sue Prince with Helen Strange; Rena Clark 
with Jennie Murekison, and Gertrude Sullivan with Mattie Hunter. 



SENIOR RECEPTIONS. 



A FISH STOKY. 

The Class of 1905 met again on the afternoon of Saturday, Febru- 
ary 18th, for another of the social affairs they enjoy so much, which 
this time took the form of a "'Trip to the Sea." Sadie Jenkins and 
Effie Fairley on this occasion proved themselves most delightful host- 
esses. 

Everyone was invited to fish, and fortunately everyone had a bite 
and landed her prize ! ]STo, not a real live fish, but a mysterious pack- 
age in the shape of one of the finny creatures which, opened, was found 
to contain an attractive souvenir of the occasion. Dorothy Hughson 
captured the one containing the little silver fish, which was the especial 
favor. 

After the fishing party the guests were invited to a set luncheon where 
delicious refreshments were served, everything suggesting the idea of 
the sea. 



AT POVERTY LSTN". 

Ida Evans, Mamie Rossell, Rena and Anna Clark entertained the 

Senior Class February eleventh in their private sitting-room, "Poverty 

Inn." The amusement was trimming hats. 

'Twas Saturday last at half past four, 

That the Seniors all knocked at the "sittin'-room" door. 

And then what visions of surprise 

Appeared before their astonished eyes. 

The walls were covered with pennants galore, 

And a swell carpet was on the floor ; 

Divans and flowers, I do declare, 

Gave "Poverty Inn" a luxurious air. 



6 The St. Mary's Muse. 



As soon as we all on the divans sat, 

Each charming young lady was given a hat; 

And loaded with ribbons and flowers, too, 

And told her very best to do. 

Then every one set to work with a will 

And went on trimming, and trimming, until 

Each hat was a beauty to behold, 

All of them very becoming we're told. 

Then all of us voted with scrupulous care, 

And breathlessly waited the decision to hear ! 

M. DuBose a hat-pin got 

For having the best trimmed hat in the lot. 

Florrie's hat the scissors took, 

And you ought to have seen how she did look ! 

Delightful refreshments were served in style, 

And all of us sta3 T ecl a very long while. 

But at last we had all to arise with a sigh, 

And we bade the "Poverty Inners," good-bye. 



M. R. DuB. 

S. M. J. 



The Lecture Course of 1904-05. 



DR MIMS OF TRINITY ON "ROBERT BROWNING." 

"All we have willed or hoped or dreamed of good shall exist 
Not its semblance but itself; no beauty, nor good, nor power 
Whose voice has gone forth but each survives for the melodist 

When eternity affirms the conception of anhour. 
The high that proved too high, the heroic for earth too hard, 

The passion that left the ground to lose itself in the sky, 
Are music sent up to God by the lover and the bard ; 

Enough that he heard it once ; we shall hear it by and by." 

Browning in "Abt Voglee." 

It was with, a message that Professor Edwin Mims of Trinity College 
came to St. Mary's on the evening of February 25th, and the message 
was delivered in no uncertain tone. Dr. Mims' reputation is high as 
thinker and speaker, and in his treatment of "Robert Browning: Poet 
and Man," he not only interested, he inspired his hearers, opening for 
them a new field of thought and beauty. Some lectures entertain, others 
have real depth and worth. This one both pleased and counted. His 
words were seed that should bear much fruit. 

Without denying the obscurity that mars so much of the work of 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Browning, Dr. Minis in clear and telling phrases gave a different idea 
of Browning from that usually held. He painted the many-sided man 
of the world, versed alike in literature, science and music; humorist, 
sociologist, artist ; royal in intellect as well as subtle in delicate spiritual 
feeling; devoting his life to the solution of the problems of the ages; 
interpreting them through poetry; and with all his genius as poet and 
dramatist reaching for an answer to the Why, and finding it in the 
realization of the truths of the Christian religion. 

Dr. Mims showed that it is not always easy to read Browning's mes- 
sage, but like all else of value he is worth the price, the time and study 
that is required to unravel him. In the beginning we need an inter- 
preter to guide us into the beauties and depths of the dramatic mono- 
logue. Soon we become our own interpreters. 

To those who would enter the path that Dr. Mims has pointed, he 
suggests as the best first help, Corson's Introduction to Browning 
(Heath & Co.) ; this mastered, the student is ready for the true apprecia- 
tion of the poet, an appreciation that must make him or her wiser and 
better. 

Professor Mims' lecture was the first of a series which will be given 
at the school this spring. The next will be delivered by Dr. H. L. 
Smith of Davidson College on March 18th, to be followed by Prof. C. 
A. Smith of Chapel Hill on March 25th, and Prof. Benj. Sledd of 
Wake Forest on April 11th. 

We were glad to have delegations from Peace Institute and the Bap- 
tist University present at this first lecture, and hope to have them with 
us again. 



[From the News and Observer, Feb. 18.] 
PIANO RECITAL OF MISS MATTIE CAROLINE HUNTER. 

ASSISTED IN VIOLIN BY MISS GERTRUDE ELAINE SANBORN AND 
MISS MARGARET ROSALIE DUBOSE. 

A large audience was gathered last evening at St. Mary's to hear an 
interesting recital given by Miss Mattie Caroline Hunter. Miss Hun- 
ter, formerly a pupil of Miss Schutt, took her certificate in music last 
June and has continued her studies this year with Miss Pixley. Miss 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Hunter's playing is characterized by refinement and brilliancy with a 
reserve power which shows a beautiful gift beautifully trained. The 
Beethoven Sonata was managed with a skill and appreciation unusual 
in so young a player, the Rondo being especially well played. The two 
Moszkowski numbers, "Etincelles" and "Air de Ballet," were given with 
daintiness and spirit and a fine sense of rhythm. The Mendelssohn 
"Rondo Capriccioso" was clean and strong, with no straining for effects. 
But the young artist was at her best in the Chopin Impromptu in A 
flat, which she interpreted with exquisite grace and tenderness, and in 
the Strauss "Reverie," where she gave herself up to a musical dream 
and took her audience with her. Miss Hunter was ably assisted in 
violin by [Miss Sanborn and Miss DuBose. 
The program was: 

Beethoven Sonata, Opus 13 

Allegro di Molto E Con Brio, 
Adagio, 
Rondo. 

Fesca Adagio for Two Violins 

Miss Sanborn and Miss DuBose. 
Miss Catharine Hampton at the Piano. 



Moszkowski 


Etincelles 


Mendelssohn 


Rondo Capriccioso 


Ogarew 


Romance for Violin 




Miss Sanborn. 




Miss Sadie Jenkins at the Piano. 


Chopin 


Impromptu in A Flat 


Strauss 


Reverie 


Moszkowski 


Air de Ballet. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Subscription, One Year. = = = = One Dollar. 

Single Copies, = = = - - Fifteen Cents. 



A Magazine published monthly except in EDITORIAL STAFF 

July and August at St. Mary'sSchool, Raleigh, Anna B Clark Editor inChief 

N C, in the interest of the students and Margaret DuBose l T ^r aTO ™it™ 

Alumnae, under the editorial management of Sadie M. Jenkins j ■ L,uerai y Mllorb ' 

the Senior Class. Ida P. Evans Social Editor. 

Address all communications and send all Linda Tillin^hastl""""""/ Loc3bl Editors, 
subscriptions to Rena H clark Exchange Editor. 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, Effle C. Fairley ___'i 

_.__ __ Florence Grant > Associate Editors. 

Raleigh, N. c. Mossie Long j 

Mary E. Rossell Business Manager. 

Ellen P. Gibson ) PrMtnr „ nn Ar1 „ 

CORRESPONDENCE FROM FRIENDS SOLICITED. Dorothy M. HughsOn j -^uiluis uu aus. 

Application made at the post-office at Raleigh, for admission to the mail as second-class matter. 

Editorial. 



The Editors are busily working on the annual Muse. They hope to 
have it up to the standard of the preceding years, and are laboring to 
prove that the Class of 1905 is as efficient as any which has gone before. 



The Muse wishes to extend deepest sympathy to Carrie Cowles on 
the death of her grandmother, Mrs. Dr. Mott of Statesville, with whom 
she made her home. After a short visit home she has returned to resume 
her duties at St. Mary's. 



The pleasant spring days have been very welcome to the girls who 
are interested in athletics. Every afternoon the basket-ball players have 
been out on the field, and although they do not feel much in practice yet, 
they hope to be fully ready by Easter to have an interesting match 
game. The tennis courts, too, are in constant use, and a tournament at 
no distant date is being talked of. 



We are glad to report that the measles which has been holding sway 
at St. Mary's ever since Christmas is fast disappearing. With the ex- 
ception of one or two patients the girls are well and able to be out again. 
There have been no severe cases, but every one finds it trying to have 
to be confined to the Infirmary for three weeks. 



10 The St. Mary's Muse. 



School Notes- 



Gertrude Winston spent several days at her home in Durham in Feb- 
ruary. 

Marguerite Springs attended the Inauguration of President Roose- 
velt in Washington. 

Carrie Helen Moore, '04, of Littleton, and Josephine Bowen, of 
Jackson, are with friends at St. Mary's. 

Annie Gray Nash of Tarboro has been visiting the family of Bishop 
Cheshire at "Ravenscroft" in the Grove, and her friends greatly enjoy 
her frequent visits to them. 

On the evening of February 21st quite a party of the girls and teach- 
ers enjoyed the concert of the A. and M. College Glee Club at the Raney 
Library Hall. It was good, and every one came away much pleased. 

On the evening of February 28th a large delegation from the Music 
Department attended the lecture of Professor Bryant, Director of the 
Durham Conservatory of Music, on "Italian Poetry." The lecture was 
before the Music Section of the Woman's Club. 

Mary Robinson attended the Gimghoul and February Germans at 
Chapel Hill. She met many former students of St. Mary's there, among 
whom were: Belle Nash, "C. O." Capehart, Annie Gray Nash, Mary 
Henderson, Octavia Hughes, and Annie Cheshire. 

Margaret Stedman has been quite sick, but she is out again now, we 
are glad to say, and it is a great pleasure to' us that she came over to St. 
Mary's for a little while until she gets her strength back. She is umpire 
for the basket-ball games, a very strict one, but just what we need, for 
the "fouls" are very numerous these early games and we need to be 
"called down." 

The Chapter entertainments have come to a close for this session. 
The light little comedies have been pleasant diversions at intervals dur- 
ing the year and all are glad to attend them not only because they are 
for the Chapters but also on account of their attractiveness. We are 
sorry that the last one is over. On the evening of March 4th St. Eliza- 
beth's Chapter entertained us most agreeably with "The Fortunes of 



The St. Mary's Muse. 11 

War," a clever little parody on school girl sororities, showing the diffi- 
culties that befell a venturesome young man who disguised himself as a 
girl in order to discover the sorority secrets. As in most of the other 
plays this was the first stage appearance of the actresses and they like 
the others deserved our generous applause. The cast included Mary 
Ella Moore, Florence Kidder, Emmie Drewry, Helen Strange, Sue 
Prince and Elmer George. 



TAU DELTA GERMAK 

A visitor unexpectedly reaching St. Mary's on the night of the sixth 
of March, when the Tau Delta German Club gave its annual Spring 
German, would perhaps- have thought either that he was dreaming, or 
that the ghosts of his ancestors had arisen before him. For the dance 
was a Colonial Ball, and the guests were dressed in true colonial style. 
The brilliantly colored coats of the men (?) and the quaint, old-fash- 
ioned dresses of the girls, together with the powder and paint and black 
patches was indeed a pretty sight. 

During an intermission half-way between the figures the stately 
minuet was danced. 

The favors were representative of different countries, and the last and 
best were Confederate flags given while the girls marched to the stirring 
strains of Dixie. 

After the ball delightful refreshments were served. 

The german was gracefully led by V. A. Glazebrook with Miss Eld- 
redge. Those following were: 

M. Villepigue with Miss DuBose ; I. P. Evans with Miss Anna Clark ; D. M. Hugh- 
son with Miss Rossell ; E. P. Gibson with Miss Carter; F. L. Grant with Miss Isabel 
Ruff; F. E. Woolf with Miss Sullivan; G. Winston with Miss Drewry; M. E. George 
with Miss Spruill ; J. E. Boylan with Miss Mary Ella Moore ; B. Springs with Miss 
Helen Clark; J. A. Murchison with Miss Hunter; M. L. Robinson with Miss Carson; 
E. Croft with Miss Edmondston ; V. E. Bailey with Miss Short ; M. Walker with 
Miss Stedman ; C. H. Moore with Miss Hull ; B. Albright with Miss Seay ; S. Bynum 
with Miss Harris ; A. Davis with Miss Emerson ; E. Barnwell with Miss Green ; K. 
Glazebrook with Miss Whitaker; F. H. Kidder with Miss Critz ; S. Prince with Miss 
Winslow; H. Strange with Miss Josephine Bowen. 



12 The St. Mary's Muse. 



That Afternoon Study-Hall. 



This awful mode was thought of 

By whom I do not know, 
For causing the poor unstudious girls 

A great, great deal of woe. 

We enter every class room, 
Hope's light gone from our eyes ; 

In our opinion study-hall's worse 
Than the worm that never dies. 

We look upon each teacher's face, 
Leave knowledge at the door ; 

We miss, and miss, poor wretched souls, 
Where we never missed before. 

At half past four we leave our friends, 
The ones who've not been bad ; 

When we come back they tell us 
Of the good times they have had. 

The girls who come to St. Mary's 

Must study one and all ; 
If not, they'll surely have to go 

To afternoon study-hall. 



Sue Peince, '07. 



ALUMNAE MATTERS 

Conimunications and Correspondence Solicited. 
St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 



President, - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

[Mrs. M. T. Leak, Durham. 
v Prtt=itt>t-tv-ts J Mrs - L M " Pittenger, Raleigh, 

\ ICE-rEESIDE>,TS, < MrB p p Tacke - R a l eig b, 

l_ Mrs. Kate de R. Meares, Wilmington. 
Sec-Teeas., - Miss Kate MeKimnion, St. Mary's. 



To the Alumnae. 



In a letter published in the December Muse, Mrs. Ella Tew Lindsay 
of the Class of '79, now of Glendale, S. C, introduced a subject which 
it is in order to talk over, and which we should much like to have 
every member of the Alumnae discuss with us, namely, Alumnae re- 
unions. 

Class reunions have become so firmly and successfullv established at 
manv old institutions that thev are a recognized feature of the Com- 
mencement season, and without them Commencement would hardly be 
Commencement. At others the situation is such that it is rarely practi- 
cable to make any attempt to encourage the classes to meet at their Alma 
Mater, and unless through the efforts of the class, '"Jennie and Lucie 
and Kate" never meet, or at any rate never meet on the scene of their 
school days from the day when they part to scatter out into the world. 

St. Marv's is one of that maioritv of schools where little svstematic 
effort has been made to draw the Alumnae back. This has been for a 
variety of reasons. It is enough for the present to think only of the 
present and future and to enquire whether such class or alumnae re- 
unions are practicable and desirable. 

Three things are essential to the success of a meeting of alumnae — 
the presence of a goodly number of old girls, an attractive program for 
the meeting, and a hearty welcome to the meeting. Of most importance 
is a sufficient interest on the part of the Alumnae for them to put aside 
their other duties and give their presence. The presence of a goodly 
bodv of visitors in itself almost assures a successful meeting and a 
sense of being repaid for the trouble of the trip. 

But Alumnae cannot be expected to exert them-elves to leave their 



14 The St. Mary's Muse. 



homes and go to their old school merely on account of the possibility or 
even the probability of meeting old friends. The program for the re- 
union must be sufficiently attractive to insure a satisfactory trip even 
though the visitor should be the only "old girl" present. And the warm 
welcome ! How much good it does accomplish ! How it does one's heart 
good and helps to get rid of the lump in the throat that seems to rise 
when you see how much is changed from the familiar scenes. To< feel 
as if one had come back to her own again, and be greeted not as an "ex" 
but as one with a real right to be on hand ! 

St. Mary's has not room to entertain at the school any very large 
gathering of her daughters and largely on account of this the meetings of 
the Alumnae Association have been poorly attended and non-representa- 
tive. They have accomplished good, they have been attended by many 
within reach, but no> one has made any real effort to get within reach, 
and the good has been minimized. 

We at the school should like to see more of the alumnae feature in the 
Commencement exercises. We want now to know what the Alumnae 
think about it. We ask you here and now to think some over the matter 
and write us. your views. 

It might be practicable to make some such plan as this. To desig- 
nate the Tuesday in Commencement Week as Alumnae Day. To have 
the regular meeting of the Association in the morning, give up the after- 
noon to class reunions, etc., and at night have an address to the Alumnae 
by a speaker chosen by them. 

This should insure the second requisite for a happy meeting. The 
school can, will, and does assure the third. Only the Alumnae can 
assure the first. Is there enough interest in the matter to warrant ac- 
tion ? 

This is a good occasion for the Alumnae to meet together and rejoice. 
As a result of their liberality the enlarged Chapel, a more tangible if 
not a more valuable evidence of the work of the Association for St. 
Mary's than the Smedes Scholarship, is ready for inspection and ap- 
proval. The Muse in its monthly form gives the opportunity for a dis- 
cussion of the plans and purposes needful to prepare for a successful 



meeting. 



May we not ask again that you will write us and let us know what 
your feeling is ? 



The St. Mary's Muse. 15 



A Pleasant Trip Among the Alumnae. 



During a short trip last summer in the interest of the school, although 
the mission was largely to business men, it was the privilege of the 
writer to meet several "old St. Mary's girls." It is a pleasure to bear 
testimony to their lively interest in St. Mary's and to make a personal 
acknowledgment of the kind reception everywhere accorded to her rep- 
resentative. 

Many were the affectionate inquiries for old teachers and dear 
friends, Mrs. Iredell, Miss Xate McKimmon, Miss Dowd and others. 

Among these old girls in Winston are Mrs. W. A. Whitaker (Anna 
Bitting), whose daughter, Grace, is now a Sophomore at St. Mary's, and 
her sister, Mrs. D. K". Dalton (Louise Bitting), who has a daughter, 
Margaret, who is a prospective Freshman; Mrs. J. S. Grogan (Mamie 
Perkins), and Mrs. R. M. McArthur (Cleve Sawyer of Edenton). 

Mamie Settle, class of '81, still lives in Greensboro, where she has 
a very responsible position in the State jSTormal and Industrial School. 
Lilian Staples is now Mrs. William Tallman and lives in l\ T ew York, 
where her husband has a wider field for his profession as an artist. 

It so happened that it was my privilege to be in Charleston, and to be 
present on the closing day of the school year, at the w T ell-known school 
of the Misses Sass on Legare St. This school is the fortunate possessor 
of a scholarship at St. Mary's, so it was a peculiar pleasure on that occa- 
sion to see the smiles of pride and satisfaction on the bright faces of 
the children, when they learned that the Essayist of our banner class of 
1904 was a graduate of their school and the holder of the scholarship, 
Esther Means. 

St. Mary's has no more devoted Alumnae in Charleston than Mary 
Frost, '90, and Susan Frost, '91. The Misses Kavenel, whose periodic 
visits to St. Mary's are eagerly looked forward to, were in Europe at 
the time. 

Bertha Smith of Raleigh is now Mrs. F. K. Myers of Charleston. 
Marie Lee has become Mrs. H. H. Covington, the wife of the successful 
rector of the church of the Holy Comforter at Sumter. 

At Florence it was a pleasure to meet Mr. L. H. Meares, whose mother 



16 The St. Mary's Muse. 

is so pleasantly remembered as a graduate, and as a lady principal in 

Dr. Bennett Smedes' time. 

It is worthy of note that in the competitive examination for the 

Smedes Memorial Scholarship in the spring of 1904, the highest names 

on the list were both from Florence, S. O. : Lilian Farmer, the present 

holder of the scholarship, who, by the way, has made good her right 

thereto, by her excellent work this year; and Leah Townsend. Leah's 

mother, Mrs. McEachin (Leah McClenaghan) is doing noble work for 

St, Mary's in her private school and hopes to send us two girls for the 

next school year. 

We hope also to have one of the daughters of Mrs. Pegues of Dar- 
lington, S. C, formerly Miss Townsend, and a pupil of Mrs. Iredell 
and Miss McKimmon. Mrs. J. D. Parker (Frances Johnson), whose 
father was long the beloved rector of St. Paul's, Edenton, is now living 
at Monroe, which is the home also of Kate Fairley, whose two sisters, 
Effie and Cornie, are now at the school. 

Mrs. Robt. Oates (Claudie Holt), is now living in western jSTorth 
Carolina in that mecca of old-time Charlestonians, Flat Pock. 

In that stronghold of interest in St. Mary's, Asheville, the interests 
of the school are jealously looked after by the St. Mary's Guild, witness 
the fact of their recent generous contribution of $800 for the chancel 
of the enlarged Chapel. Among the leading spirits of the Guild are 
Mrs. Mitchell (Carrie Carr), President; Miss Fannie Patton and her 
niece, Josie (Mrs. Parker) ; Mrs. Thos. A. Jones (Josie Myers), and 

Mrs. Theo. Davidson (Sallie Carter). Lack of space forbids further 

rambling at this time. 



Alumnae Notes. 



Miss Margaret Applewhite, lately of Wilson, a student at St, Mary's 
in 1901, was married on the evening of March 1st to Mr. Ira Wain- 
wright of Wilson. 

It was very pleasant this month to hear from Miss Harriet Page 
Weir, to know that she wishes to have The Muse and to be assured of 
her "constant interest in any of the moves of dear old St. Mary's." 



The St. Mary's Muse. 17 

Miss Weir, formerly of Raleigh, was a St. Mary's girl of the '80's, and 
is now teaching in the public schools of Xew York City. 

Mrs. Francis Cameron has issued cards for the marriage of her daugh- 
ter, Frances Hawks, to Lieutenant Charles Burnett, United States 
Army. The ceremony will take place on March 15th at Fort Ethan 
Allen, Vermont. Frances Cameron is a graduate of St. Mary's of the 
Class of '98. She is a Raleigh girl, but of recent years has made her 
home with her brother, Captain Francis Cameron, U. S. A. 



With the St. Mary's Guilds. 



The Rector, March 4th, 5th, 6th, made a brief trip to Goldsboro, Xew 
Bern and Kinston in the interest of St. Mary's. We hope to give 
further news of this visit in the next Muse. It is sufficient for this time 
to say that he met with a splendid reception everywhere and came back 
realizing more fully than ever the devoted loyalty of the daughters of 
St. Mary's and their interest in all that affects their Alma Mater. From 
the Goldsboro Guild we hear the following: 

ST. -MARY'S GUILD, GOLDSBORO. 

Miss Alice Edwards Jones, Correspondent. 

Goldsboro, March 6, 1905. 

A meeting preliminary to the re-organization of the St. Mary's Guild 
of St. Stephen's Parish was held at eight o'clock, March 3d, at the 
home of Mrs. L. C. Fulghum, where a few of the old St. 'Mary's girls, 
together with some of the friends of the school, were informally but 
charmingly addressed by the Rector, Mr. DuBose. 

It was good for her loving daughters to hear of the continued success 
of their Alma Mater, but far better it was for them to renew their vows 
of loyalty to dear old St. Mary's. 

It is the purpose of the Rector, in the re-organization of the Guilds 
throughout the State, to widen the bounds of eligibility to membership, 
and not, as heretofore, to narrow the roll-call to the names of the 
Alumnae. In this way it is hoped that the sweet influence of St. Mary's 



18 The St. Mary's Muse. 

will reach many whose great privilege it has not been to hold daily com- 
munion with her beloved spirit. 

At this meeting the former president, Mrs. L. C. Fulghum, was re- 
tained, and there was held an election of a corresponding secretary, 
Miss Alice Edwards Jones. Those present to meet the Rector were: 
Mesdames L. 0. Fulghum (Lizzie Collier), Mary Slocumb (Mary W. 
Evans), W. B. Boyd (Kate Snow), E. G. Porter, and B. R. King; 
Misses Corinne Dortch, Anna Privett, Sallie Hicks, Ellen Dortch, Mary 
Snow Boyd, Susie Eulghum, and Alice Edwards Jones ; Rev. F. H. T. 
Horsfield and Mr. G. C. Royall. 



The St. Mahy's Muse. 19 



Official Notices. 



A WORD TO PARENTS AND PATRONS. 

In urging the claims of St, Mary's upon our church people this ques- 
tion has met the Rector, and it is a serious one, not against St. Mary's, 
but against all schools in these clays, namely, the personal expenses of 
fhe students. 

It was said "The main actual school expenses at St. Mary's are less 
than at other schools of the same class, but your girls spend more money 
than girls in other places." This is not true — but all young people, 
boys and girls, spend more money these days than is necessary, and if 
the parents, who supply the money, will only help, St. Mary's will try 
earnestly to "call a halt" in these matters. This is a day of organiza- 
tions, societies, sororities, etc, and pins, badges, rings, banquets are the 
order of the day. If the mothers and the fathers will supply the money 
freely, why St. Mary's girls will spend it as freely as any girls, but it is 
not a fault of St. Mary's, but of the age and condition in which we live, 
and only when the parents unite with the school in some systematic way 
can this excess be controlled. 

The Rector earnestly begs the help of all parents and the sympathy 
of all friends, for the girls will be against him. 



SCHOOL PROGRAM. 

March-April, 1905. 

March 11. 8.15 p. m.— Lecture: Dr. H. A. Royster, of Raleigh, on "The Physical 
Life." 

March 18. 7.15 p. >i. — "Social Evening." 

March 18. 8.15 p. m.— Lecture : Dr. H. L. Smith, of Davidson College, on "The 
Life and Death of a World." 

March 22. 8.15 p. m.— Certificate Recital. 

March 25. 8.15 p. si. — Lecture: Professor C. Alphonso Smith, of Chapel Hill, on 
"Literature in the South." 

April 8. 8.15 p. m. — Lecture: Professor Benjamin Sledd, of Wake Forest, on "The 
South as a Field for the Poet." 

April 15. 8.15. p. M. — Pupil's Recital. 

April 16. Palm Sunday. 5.30 p. si. — Annual Visitation of the Bishop for Con- 
firmation. 



Advertisements. 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss not ours. 



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STANDARD GAS AND ELECTRIG CO., 

124 FATETTEVILLE ST. 



JNO. P. HAYES, Photographer. 

Kodak work of all kinds. 

Don't forget to bny your Shoes of 

POOLE & ALLEN'S Shoe Store. 

KING'S UP-TO-DATE DRUG STORE 

AND SODA FOUNTAIN. 
Corner Fayetteville and Hargett Streets. 

You'll find up-to-date Shoes at 

HUNTER BROS. & BREWER. 

ELLINGTON'S ART STORE, 
Raleigh. N. C. 
Everything in Art.' 
Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs. 

Private Dining and Banquet Halls at 

GIERSCFTS, 216 Fayetteville St. 

THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS, Raleigh, N. C — 
Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 

DARNELL & THOMAS, 
Pianos and Organs. 
Sheet music and small goods. 
Raleigh, N. C. 



KING'S GROCERY, 

"The Little Store." 



M. Rosenthal & Company 



GROCERS 



136 FATETTEVILLE STREET. 



Good things always at 

BRETSCH'S BAKERY. 

Buy ROYSTER-S Fine Candies. 

Fine Sporting Goods. 



SINGER SEWING MACHINE, 

130 Fayetteville Street. 

THE J. D RIGGAN COMPANY. 

Holiday Goods. 

WEATHERS & UTLEY, 

Art Dealers. 

MISSES REESE & COMPANY, 

Millinery. 

CALIFORNIA FRUIT STORE, 

Fruit and Confections. 

ANTICEPHALALGINE cures quickly and 
safely Headache in all its forms. 

JOLLY & WYNNE JEWELRY COMPANY 

Wedding and Holiday presents. 
Fine Watch and Jewelry repairing. 

CROWELL'S 
DRUG STORE. 

120 Fayetteville Street. 

For the most satisfactory work, 

Try RIGGSBEE at 
Watson & Co's., Gallery. PHOTOGRAPHS. 

T. W. BLAKE, 

Rich Jewelry and Silverware. 
Repairingpromptly done. 



PERRY & ROSENTHAL, Trust Bldg. 
Ladies' Fine Shoes. 

DR V. E. TURNER, 
Dentist. 



Advertisements. 



SALVATORE DESIO, 

Manufacturing- Jeweler and Silversmith. 

1012 F. St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

On application will send any article selected. 
To St. Mary's, discount often per cent. 

YOUNG & HUGHES, 

Plumbers, Steam and Gas Fitters. 
121 Fayetteville Street. 



If its furnishing the Home, Office, School or 

Hall, see us. 

ROYALL & BORDEN FURNITURE CO., 

Cor. Wilmington and Hargett Streets, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

C W. BARRETT, 

ARCHITECT. 




CGfFIi 



ROBT. SIMPSON, Drugs ^ e ^r u tS,etc. 



JOHN C. DREWRY. 
"MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE." 

JOHNSON & JOHNSON, 
COAL, WOOD AND ICE 



The National Ban^ of Raleigh, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Capital 5225,000. Surplus and Profits $115,000. 



Chas. H. Bei/vin, President. 

Chas. E. Johnson, Vice-President. 

F. H. Briggs, Cashier 

J. B. Timbeelakb, Teller and Ass't Cashier. 



Safe Deposit Boxes in Fire and Burglar Proof 
Vault for rent at moderate cost. Absolutely 
safe place for keeping valuables of all kind. 



Directors: 

C. M. Busbee, James A. Briggs, T. B. Crowder 

Julius Lewis, Chas. E. Johnson, F. O. Moring, 

Chas. H. Belvin, J. W. Harden, Jr. 

A . E> U G H I , 

RESTAURANT AND ICE CREAM PARLOR. 

Confections, Foreign and Domestic Fruits. 

CATERER. 

St. Mary's folk know and approve of Dughi. 

D T. JOHNSON & SONS. 
GROCERS. 



H. STEINMETZ, 

FLORIST. 
Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets, 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns and all kinds 
Raleigh.] of Plants. [Phone 113 

J. S. MacDONALD & CO., Jewelers. 

Diamonds, Watches, Clocks, Silverware, 

Jewelry, Class Rings, Medals and 

Badges to order. 

217 N. Charles St. Baltimore, Md. 

HELLEU'S SHOE STORE. 

GYMNASIUM SHOES. 

RALEIGH SAVINGS BANK. 
Capital 815,000 Surplus $25,000. 

Deposits over $600,000. 
Four per cent interest paid on deposits. 



Location Central for the Carolinas. 
^Hj Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 

'• ■■■■■■ — ■ ■ — — ■ ■■ - - .— ■ — ■■ — ■ --. — ..- . . ■■■-,- 

St. Marts School, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

(for girls and young women). 

63d ANNUAL SESSION BEGAN SEPTEMBER 15, 1904. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGINS JANUARY 26, 1905. 



/ 1. THE COLLEGE. 

St, Mary's \ * THE M USIC SCHOOL, 

offers instruction in these < 3. THE BUSINESS SCHOOL. 

Departments: > 4 THE ART SCHOOL. 

\ 5. THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL. 

In 1903-4 were enrolled 241 students from 17 Dioceses. 

Twenty-five Members in the Faculty. 



Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department. Much Equipment New. Twenty-eight 
Pianos. Mew Chickering Grand Piano Just Added. 

Special attention to the Social and Christian Side of Education without slight 
to the scholastic training. ^<'-?$S* ?*■£#-■ i^^&'^^sML 

For Catalogue and other information address 

Rev. McNeely DuBose, B. #, /A Z>., 

RECTOR. 




april, 1905 



■ 
■ 

■ 
I 



* 



■ 
I! 

1 



mm 



%t. dfoar?'s flftuse 






♦ 



IRaldgb, B $. 



r 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



LENT NUMBER. 



Vol. IX. 



April, 1905. 



No. 9. 



Sunset. 

0, glorious hour of sunset, 

You'll come to me again, 
When years have written on my brow 

Their tale of joy and pain. 
And I'll see dear old St. Mary's, 

And the Chapel in the light, 
As the golden glory floods the sky, 

And the sun sinks out of sight. 

The girls pouring out from the doorways 

In one continuous stream. 
Gay as the bridge to Asgard, 

Will come into my dream; 
And like the pious Arab 

When called to prayer at night, 
I'll join the throng at the Chapel 

As the sun sinks out of sight. 

The organ's solemn pealing 

"Dear Lord, abide with me, 
For fast doth fall the eventide," 

W r ill often comfort me. 
While visions of St. Marv's 

Will come to me at night. 
And I'll see the Chapel in the glow 

As the sun sinks out of sight. 



And when life's day is ended, 

And the lessons all are done, 
May I feel the benediction, 

That comes with the setting sun, 
When called to prayer at the Chapel, 

And may my faith grow bright, 
As I offer my last evening prayer, 

And the sun sinks out of sight. 



-Axne Archbell. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



The Junior Auxiliary at St- Mary's. 



Lent is the time when our minds turn most earnestly to missionary 
work, and each. Junior Auxiliary Chapter chooses some special Lenten 
occupation, and redoubles its energy to have the result of this occupa- 
tion complete by Easter. 

St. Mary's has six Chapters of the Junior Auxiliary — St. Anne's in 
Miss Sutton's Dormitory, St. Catherine's in Senior Hall, St. Elizabeth's 
on the second floor of the main building, St. Etheldreda's consisting of 
the two second floors of the Rock Houses, St. Margaret's in Miss Bowen's 
Dormitory, and St. Monica's in Miss Katie's Dormitory. Each of 
these chapters is assessed for the Aldert and Bennett Smedes scholar- 
ships in China and at the Thompson Orphanage for the whole year^ 
and besides this each one has a regular yearly object chosen by itself, 
and besides this again, a separate Lenten work. Several of the Chap- 
ters are helping to pay the chapel debt this year, and St. Etheldreda's 
has put a handsome credence table in the sanctuary in memory of Mrs. 
Bratton. During Lent, St. Anne's, St. Monica's and St. Etheldreda's 
have undertaken to make clothes for some children, and they meet one 
or two evenings a week in Recreation Hour and sew. At the meetings 
of one Chapter, while the other girls sew, one of the members reads from 
a course of study on Alaska. This was suggested by Miss Jarvis of 
Connecticut, who visited us in January, and gave us many new and 
helpful ideas, instigating us for one thing to more formality in our 
meetings, and more study of missions. 

l$o one can overestimate the value of the Junior Auxiliary Chapters 
at St. Mary's. For above the good they do in a missionary way to out- 
siders, is the good they do to us in the school, keeping us constantly in 
touch with the noble, consecrated men and women all over the world, 
who are giving their lives to the spreading of the glory of God. 

S. M. J., '05. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Slipping." 



Oh ! what is that noise ? I do believe I hear foot-steps in the hall — 
suppose I am caught, what will they do to me ? I wonder if Miss 

B could have seen me come back after the girls had gone and has 

followed me up here. Oh ! I do wish I had gone to Chapel. I don't 
think skipping is fun at all. 

Dear ! the noise comes closer and closer. I am just sure she will 
catch me. Where can I hide ? This old closet door squeaks so when 
it is opened that I dare not try to hide there for she would hear me cer- 
tainly. I wish teachers didn't have ears and eyes all over their heads. 

Gracious ! if I am caught I know I can't go to the play Monday 
night, and all the girls are going — why did I ever want to skip to- 
night ? But, listen ! there is something making a fuss right in my 
closet, I do believe — goodness ; what can it be ? Suppose it is a man \ 
why he could come out and kill me and nobody would know about it un- 
til I was dead. Oh ! dear me ! O ! O ! . He shan't kill me. I 

won't let him kill me. I'll be so still that he won't know I am here and 
when the girls get back, if they ever do, I will tell them and we will get 
Mr. O. to come up and get him. But look at that door ! It 
is just shaking. He is getting ready to come out. Oh ! I am scared to 
death. How I wish I were in that dear old Chapel ! Hark ! they are 
singing now. Mercy ! will that hymn ever end ? 

O ! for a few minutes more of life — if I could only see my own 
mother once more. 

Oh ! he is coming now sure enough ! Oh . 

Just at this moment, Major Rat walked in a dignified manner through 
the hole he had made under the door. Mary caught only a glimpse of 
him, for no sooner had he made his appearance than she sped out of the 
door and down stairs, nearly upsetting a teacher as she rushed into -the 
parlor where the girls, just returned from Chapel, were dancing. Of 
course she told Lizzie all about it, but the other girls wonder why Mary 
is so "crazy about" Chapel now. or rather why she new will con-en r 
to skip with them. Eula Gregory, '07. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



The Lecture Course. 



The lecture course, which, was begun in February by Prof. Minis, of 
Trinity College, with; an interesting talk on "Browning'' has been com- 
pleted during March and the first of April. On the eleventh of March, 
Dr. Hubert Royster, of Raleigh, lectured on "The Physical Life," and 
gave many practical suggestions which should be considered and put 
into practice. On March 18, Dr. H. L. Smith, President of Davidson 
College described "The Life and Death of a World." His subject was 
deep and scientific, but discoursed upon so' clearly and forcibly that it 
was well understood, and appreciated. On the night of the twenty- 
fifth, Dr. C. A. Smith, professor of English at the University of North 
Carolina, with ''Southern Literature" as a subject, won the undivided 
attention of his audience. The subject, which, in itself was very inter- 
esting to the St. Mary's girls, together with the charm of the speaker 
made this lecture especially delightful. Professor Benjamin Sledd, 
professor of English at Wake Forest College, finished the course by a 
lecture on "Women and Literature" on the night of April the eighth. 
His talk was well worthy to follow those which had preceded his, and he 
left an appreciative audience. 

These lectures have been a very pleasing and helpful factor in the 
school-life, and it is hoped to continue them hereafter with equal suc- 
cess. It is mild praise to say that we would not wish for more enter- 
taining or more satisfactory talks than have been given by these gentle- 
men, who have come to us from the several colleges of the State. 

We are very glad also to have had visitors from the Baptist Univer- 
sity, Peace Institute, A. and M. College, the Blind Institute and the 
city present to' enjoy the lectures with us. 



Pupils' Certificate Recital. 



On the evening of March twenty-three the first of the Certificate 
Recitals of the year was given. Misses Jenkins, Winslow and Lassiter, 
candidates for certificates in piano, and Miss Margaret DuBose, candi- 
date in violin, took part. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



The musical training at St. (Mary's is given on broad lines. Per- 
haps no school in the south surpasses her in technical requirements and 
the record of her pupils who have gone to conservatories to continue 
their musical education is one of which any school might be proud. 

The first number, an Allegro from the Mozart Sonata in F, was 
played by Miss Jenkins brilliantly but is not as interesting a number 
to most people as those later played by the same young lady. 

Miss DuBose gave the Accolay Concerto in a manner that showed 
careful study and painstaking labor with good technical results. In 
her Serenade and Perpetual Motion she played with good tone and ex- 
cellent wrist bowing. 

Von Weber's brilliant Polacca was played by Miss Lassiter in spir- 
ited dance pulsations, clean technic and fine tone color. The Eleva- 
tion, contrasting so strongly in character, was forceful and intensely de- 
votional under her skillful fingers. The Spinning Song of Raff with 
its twisting whirl of broken chords and vibrating song of love brought 
the picture of the scene of long ago to the present. It was nicely rend- 
ered. 

Miss Jenkins in Moszkowski's Romance brought out the melody in 
contrasting color and well rounded tone. Elfinette with its sudden 
shades of tone and spritely rhythm was characteristically played. 
Paderewski's Cracovienne was given with dash and a sonorous tone 
well rendered. 

Miss Winslow gave Tschaikowski's Boat Song with its wave echoes 
of melody with good tone. Grieg's Dance was also played with fine 
shading and true dance style. The waltz of Raff with its difficult in- 
terlacing of tone colors and melody was artistically rendered with excel- 
lent shading and well rounded tone. 

The whole recital showed the excellent work done by both teachers 
and pupils. 

Misses Lassiter and Winslow are pupils of Miss Dowd, Miss Jen- 
kins is a pupil of Miss Pixley, and Miss DuBose has been trained by 
Miss Hull. The programme was as follows : 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



Allegro, from Sonata in F Mozart 

Sadie Marcelline Jenkins. 

Concerto Accolay 

Margaret Rosalie DuBose, Miss Jenkins at the Piano. 

a Polacca Brilliant von Weber 

b Elevation of the Host Florsheim 

c Spinning Song Raff 

Mary Thornton Lassiter. 

a Romance Moszkowski 

b Elfinette Krogman 

c Cracovienne Paderewski 

Sadie Marcelline Jenkins. 

a Serenade; b Perpetual Motion Seybold 

Margaret Rosalie DuBose. 

a Barcarolle Tschaikowski 

b Norwegian Dance, op. 34, No. 2 Grieg 

c Waltz Favorite Raff 

Kate Leigh Winslow. 



Basket Ball. 



For several days before the thirteenth of March the amount of blue 
and gold, and red and black ribbons worn by the St. Mary's girls showed 
that some interesting event was near. On the afternoon of the thir- 
teenth the Olympic Athletic Association won glory for the gold and blue 
when it defeated the Corinthian Athletic Association on the basket- 
ball field. 

It was an interesting and well-played game, and the spectators 
showed their pleasure in it by much enthusiastic cheering. Three ten- 
minute innings were played, resulting in a score of eleven to four in 
favor of the Olympics. The line-up was as follows : 

Olympic. Corinthian. 

Glazebrook, V., center Walker M., center. 

Glazebrook, K., side-center Prince, S., side-center. 

Carson, J., forward Rossell, M.. forward. 

Klingensmith, C, forward Gibson, E., forward. 

Short, M., guard Winston, G., guard. 

Villepigue, M., guard Boylan, J., guard. 

Glazebrook, V., captain George, E., Captain. 

Umpire, Mr. Stone; referee, Margaret Stedman. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



St. Mary's made her debut in the field of inter-scholastic sport on the 
morning of Monday, April 10th, when she played her first match game 
of basket, ball. The reporter of the News and Observer, who was one 
of the privileged men present, tells of the event thus : 

A pretty and lively game of basket ball made gay the contest grounds at the 
Baptist University for Women yesterday morning, when rival teams from St. 
Mary's School and the Baptist University met on the field. 

It was a hard fought battle and neither side won. The score at the end 
of the game was ten to ten, and either side was happy, for honors were easy. 
The college rooterines of each institution lifted the heroines of the game on 
their shoulders and lively were the college cries. 

This writer is not up on basket ball vernacular, and the only thing he heard 
that was familiar to his ears was a cry that sounded base-ballish and foot- 
ballish. It was "Sallie is not rattled." This came as a reply to St. Mary's 
chorus of "Sallie is rattled," when the skillful Miss Sallie Tomlinson, goal 
thrower for B. U. W., was preparing to throw the ball in the basket. This 
deponent avereth upon proof of that throw, that "Sallie is not rattled," 
for she put the ball where she wanted it. 

BasTtet ball is a delightful game, and the two teams were alert and energetic. 
It is said that the contest yesterday was the first in the South beween two 
college teams. At any rate, it is the first in the State. It is to be followed by 
another at St. Mary's in the near future, and this later still by the third of the 
series. 

There was a large attendance of ladies at the game, and both schools were out 
in force with their ribbons flying. The male visitors were limited to umpire, 
referees, scorer, college presidents and professors, a few school trustees, some 
staid invited guests, and one diffident reporter, who viewed the game from a 
window of the University chapel. Crowds of young men were outside on the 
sidewalk, but as the ground is shut in by the buildings and a hedge of pretty 
girls shut up the only vacancy, these dear boys only enjoyed the pretty 
screams. 

The Baptist girls outsized their opponents from St. Mary's but the St. Mary's 
girls were the quicker. St. Mary's was lucky in throwing the ball from the 
field, but its goal thrower had hard luck in the place throw. During the game 
either side of the college girls gave various yells, and the Baptist University 
contingent sang: "Saint Ma-ree" as a parody on "Sweet Marie." There were not 
many falls or trip-ups in the game. 

Kate Glazebrook was distinctly the star in the playing for St. Mary's, 
while the goal pitching of Miss Tomlinson and the defence of Miss 
Futrell counted much for the University. 



8 The St. Mary's Muse. 

The line-up and score was as follows : 

Baptist University. St. Mary's. 

Covington Center V. Glazebrook (capt.j . 

Phillips Side-center K. Glazebrook. 

Tomlinson (capt.) j Guards I Carson - 

Johnson j ' \ Klingensmith. 

Futre11 I Forwards | Walker. 

Josey J ( Boylan. 

Goals from field: St. Mary's 4 (K. Glazebrook 2, V. Glazebrook 2), Baptist 
University 2. Goals from free throws: St. Mary's 2 (Klingensmith 1, Carson 1.). 
Baptist University 6. Final score 10-10. Two fifteen-minute halves. Referee, Mr. 
Kienholtz, A. M. C; Umpires, Mr. Wilson, B. U. W., Mr. Stone, St. Mary's. 
Scorer, Mr. Watson, B. U. W. 



School Notes. 



Gertrude Winston is at her home in Durham to stay ten days. 

Rena Clark spent a few days at her home in Tarboro during March. 

Miss Leila Major visited Kate Winslow last month, and was here for 
the Certificate Recital. 

Bessie Green, of Weldon, who> has been visiting friends in the city, 
spent a part of her time at St. Mary's. 

Cammie Jones, during a visit to the Johnsons in the ciy, spent a 
few days with her friends at St. Mary's. 

We wish to extend our sincere sympathy to Marguerite Walker, who 
has gone home to> attend the funeral of her grandmother. 

Jessie Harris, Mary Perry and Genevieve Cooper spent the four- 
teenth and fifteenth of March at their homes in Henderson. 

Nancy Fairley, after recovering from the measles and grippe, spent 
a few days at home in Rockingham, to get her strength back. 

Pattie Ward, of Richmond, spent a few hours at S\ Mary's, April 
fourth. It will be very interesting to her many old friends to know 
that she will be married in June. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

Subscription, One Year. s = = a One Dollar. 

Single Copies, = = m * ■ Fifteen Cents. 

A Magazine published monthly except in EDITORIAL STAFF 

July and August at St. Mary'sSchool, Raleigh, Anna B Clark Editor inChief. 

N. C, in the interest of the students and Margaret DuBose.- l T H^ TO Mit n « 

Alumnae, under the editorial management of Sadie M. Jenkins j literary manors. 

the Senior Class. Ida P. Evans Social Editor. 

Address all communications and send all Linda Tillinghast"!"""} ^ ocal Editors. 

subscriptions to Rena H . Clark Exchange Editor. 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, Effie C. Fairley ) 

Florence Grant ^Associate Editors. 

Raleigh, n. c. Mossie Long J 

Mary E. Rossell Business Manager. 

Ellen P. Gibson \ Fdit „ rs on Ads 

Dorothy M. Hughson / ^ dltors on Aas - 



CORRESPONDENCE FROM FRIENDS SOLICITED. 



Application made at the post-office at Raleigh, for admission to the mail as second-class matter 

With few diversions and interruptions the Lenten season is passing 
quickly and quietly away, and it is with willing and eager hearts that 
we are waiting to welcome Easter. Since the Eastertide comes so late 
in the spring this year, there ought to be a profusion of flowers of every 
kind, and we hope to make the new Chapel resplendent with life and 
beauty to celebrate its first Easter. 



After Easter the first public event will be the annual debate between 
the Epsilon Alpha Pi and Sigma Lambda Literary Societies on the 
night of April the twenty-sixth. The subject is, 

Resolved, That the indiscriminate education of all classes is produc- 
tive neither of discontent nor evil to society, or to the individual. 

Rena Clark and Elmer George, of the Epsilon Alpha Pi Society will 
uphold the affirmative, while Ellen Gibson and Anna Clark of the 
Sigma Lambda Society will try to prove the negative. 



The first real evidence of the nearness of commencement has been 
shown in the election of marshals. The marshals are elected from the 
Literary Societies, who take turns at the privilege of electing the chief. 
The representatives this year are: From the Epsilon Alpha Pi, Bettie 



10 The St. Mary's Musk 



Woolf, chief, Elmer George and Gertrude Sullivan; from the Sigma 
Lambda Society, Senah Critz and Jennie Murcliison. 



We are very anxious to have some St. Mary's songs expressive of our 
love and loyalty for the school, and we would appreciate greatly any 
suggestions from the old girls, either of words, or tunes to which, we 
can set words, or both. St. Mary's has given certificates to quite a 
number of gifted music students, and now she asks that they use some 
of their talent for her. 



A Parody. 



Ten little St. Mary's girls marching in line, 
One dropped out, and then there were nine. 

Nine little St. Mary's girls who were always late, 
One turned over a new leaf and left but eight. 

Eight little St. Mary's girls playing basket-ball, 
Only seven were left when one had a fall. 

Seven little St. Mary's girls always playing tricks, 
One got reported and then there were six. 

Six little St. Mary's girls, glad to be alive, 

But one was sent to study-hall, then there were five. 

Five little St. Mary's girls at the office door, 

One got her head blown off then there were four. 

Four little St. Mary's girls loved Washington, you see, 
For one received a hatchet, then there were three. 

Three little St. Mary's girls with too much to do, 
One went to the Infirmary and left but two. 

Two little St. Mary's girls weighing quite a ton, 
One starved herself to death, then there was one. 

One little St. Mary's girl — then it happened there were none, 
For an A. and M. boy her little heart had won. 

Blandina Springis. 



ALUMNAE MATTERS 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 

President, - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

f Mrs. M. T. Leak, Durham. 
Vice-Presidents J Mrs - 1 M ' Pittenger, Raleigh, 

VICE PRESIDENTS, -j Mrs p p Tucker RaleigQj 

|_Mrs.Kale de R. Meares, Wilmington. 
Sec.-Treas., - Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 



Alumnae Editorial. 



We must confess to a little disappointment this month occasioned by 
the lack of response to the requests and suggestions made through last 
month's issue of the paper. We still believe that a goodly number of 
the alumnae are interested in a reunion and would help to make a re- 
union at this Commencement or at any other fit time a real success, but 
we had hoped that some at least of these would be sufficiently interested 
in the matter to write their views. Xot one line of expression have we 
had from any one. 

At the annual meeting of the Alumnae held during the Commence- 
ment season last year it was decided to celebrate this the twenty-fifth 
anniversary of the founding of the association by a banquet and silver 
collection. If this resolution is to be carried out successfully the ar- 
rangements must be perfected speedily. Mrs. Iredell, President of the 
Association, has been in Asheville for some weeks recuperating, but 
wishes it stated that it is her purpose within the next few w 7 eeks to send 
out a notice of the coming meeting to each member of the association 
and to ask each one for co-operation. We hope that this more personal 
appeal will bring results. 

At length, with the placing of the additional pews, the regular work in 
connection with the enlarging of the Chapel is finished and the renewed 
building stands completely ready for use. The efforts of the Alumnae 
Association will now be devoted to raising the additional funds necessary 
to clear off the debt, while the Rector will be glad to give his attention 
to the arrangements for the various furnishings which are needed and 
which it is hoped will be given in the near future as memorials by 



12 The St. Mary's Muse. 

various friends. It is proposed in the next month to have a special 
service in the Chapel in thanksgiving for the completion of the work 
thus far. A full account of this service will appear later. 

The beautifying of the Chapel is already progressing. A handsome 
memorial window for the nave will be placed by Easter Sunday, a me- 
morial litany-desk and prie-dieu are now enroute, orders have been 
placed for a pair of eucharistie lights and a pair of seven-branched 
candle-sticks. The temporary window in the chancel will also soon be 
displaced by the handsome permanent window. Mention has already 
been made of the beautiful credence table given by St. Etheldreda's 
Chapter as a memorial to Mrs. Bratton. 

On Palm Sunday the first confirmation in the enlarged building will 
be held. Bishop Cheshire has this year returned to the afternoon visi- 
tation and the service will be at 5.30. Lent is always the one period of 
quiet in the bustle of the school activity at St. Mary's, and while the 
lecture course with its intellectual stimulus and some athletic diver- 
sions to help keep up the physical well-being have been in order the 
social life has been entirely relaxed. The sweet tri-weekly afternoon 
services, the Thursday communions, the little talks of the Rector at the 
evening Chapel service and his confirmation talks on Sunday after- 
noons have all had a helpful, healthful influence. The Easter services 
are intentionally simple, but coming as they do at the close of the Holy 
Week, which is opened for us not only by the Palm Sunday but by the 
blessed confirmation service, they mark a real climax in the spiritual 
life of the year. We would that every old St. Mary's girl and every 
friend of St. Mary's could be present to unite with us in these services. 



Miss Mildred Lee. 



The death of Miss Mildred Lee, General Lee's youngest daughter, 
which occurred on March 27th at New Orleans, not only marks the 
passing of another figure beloved by every lover of the Lost Cause and 
of one who made hosts of friends not only for her father's sake but 
through her own charming personality, but it has a special interest for 
St. Mary's. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 13 

During the war Jays Mildred Lee was a St. Mary's girl. Miss 
Katie remembers her well as a school-mate. Only a week or so before 
her death another St. Mary's girl of those days, in a letter of reminis- 
cences, was recalling the serenades which passing troops would fre- 
quently give at the school in especial honor of Mildred Lee and Lucia 
Polk, the daughters of their fathers. The old buildings have been the 
scenes of many interesting happenings, but when all is said they will 
probably never again be put to such good use as in those trying days. 
Miss Lee is a living figure in them and with her one more of those 
whom St. Mary's knew and loved is resting. 



Alumnae Notes. 



Irene Wood's subscription came in lately with a letter of good wishes 
for the Muse. She told us of the marriage of Marie DeVoe, who is 
now Mrs. F. H. Mallard. 

Miss Bella Parker, of Tarboro, visited at Bishop Cheshire's in March, 
and was at St. Mary's frequently for the Chapel services. Miss Parker 
was a pupil at St. Mary's during the third year of its existence, and her 
talks and reminiscences were most interesting to all who had the good 
fortune to be with her. 

It is with genuine gladness that we arc able to state that Mr. Jeud- 
wine's health is steadily though slowly improving. All of the reports 
from him have been awaited with deepest interest and sympathy by his 
many St. Mary's friends, who hope that it is only a question of a few 
weeks before he recovers his strength entirely. 

We are glad to know, and to tell our friends that Mrs. Iredell, who 
has been ill for most of the winter and spring, is better now and has 
gone to Asheville to recuperate. She will meet there Miss Czarnomska, 
who is also in poor health. We hope the change will benefit Mrs. 
Iredell rapidly, so that she may soon return. Her visits to St. Mary's 
have been greatly missed. 

Mary Welles' stage career has actually begun, for she has left her 
dramatic school, and now has an engagement with Virginia Harned'.* 



14 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Company. She writes that the work is far from easy, one of her recent 
rehearsals lasting almost continuously for fourteen hours. She wrote 
just as she was made up for her part that evening, so we could realize 
more fully that she is indeed in earnest. 

The St. Mary's branch of the Woman's Auxiliary were glad to wel- 
come to their March meeting Miss Kate Cheshire, the Diocesan Secre- 
tary of the Auxiliary. Miss Cheshire wished particularly to increase 
the membership of all of the branches of the diocese during Lent, and 
so visited St. Mary's with that subject to present. She spoke of her 
success in other places and of the auxiliary work in general with an in- 
terest that was helpful and wholesome. 

All of St. Mary's feel as if they knew Mrs. Geoffroy of St. Paul's 
School personally, although it has been many years since she was here. 
It will be a surprise to some of us here to know that she was at St. 
Mary's several days ago. She made a hurried visit to Raleigh, and only 
found time to come to St. Mary's at night, when it was too late to meet 
the girls. She saw the new Chapel and was delighted with it, and the 
other improvements. We hope that there may be another and longer 
visit soon. 



SCHOOL PROGRAM. 

April-May, 1905. 

April 15. 8.15 p. m. — Piano Recital, pupils of Miss Laxton. 

April 17. Palm Sunday. Early celebration, 7.30. Annual visitation of the 

Bishop for Confirmation, 5.30. 
April 16-22. Holy "Week. Daily celebration, 7.30. 
April 21. Good Friday. No school duties. 
April 23. Easter Day. Services, 11.30 and 5.30. 
April 26. 8.15, Annual Inter-Society Debate. 
April 27. 8.15, Pupils' Certificate Recital. 
April 29. 8.15, Cantata, "The Rose." 
May 4. 8.15, Pupils' Diploma Recital. 
May 6. 8.15, Dramatic Club. 
May 12. 8.15, Orchestra Concert. 
May 15-20. Examination Week. 
May 21-25. Commencement Week. I 



Advertisements. 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss not ours. 



North Carolina's Leading Dry Goods Store. 

Dobbin & Ferrall 

(At Tucker's Store.) 
123 and 125 Fayetteville Street. 



Perfectly equipped mail order service. Cor- 
respondence solicited. 



We prepay postage, express or freight charge 

anywhere in North Carolina on nil cash 

mail orders amounting to $5.00 

or more. 

DOBBIN & FERRALL. 



Established 1858. 



H. MAHLER'S SONS 



JEWELERS 



RALEIGH, 



NORTH CAROLINA. 



BOYLAN, PEARCE & CO. 



Dry Goods, Millinery, 
Tailored Costumes, 
Gloves, Hosiery, 
Handkerchiefs, 
Underwear, 
Eancy Goods. 



Mail orders filled intelligently and promptly. 



FAYETTEVILLE AND SALISBURY STS. 

RALEIGH. N. C. 



.Send to. 



ALFRED WILLIAMS & CO., 



RALEIGH, N. C. 



BOOKS, 

OF ALL KINDS. 

Select line of STATIONERY. 

Eastman's Kodaks and sup= 
plies. Office supplies. 

HAVE.... 

WHARTON 

TO MAKE YOUR 

PHOTOGRAPHS 

Remember it PAYS to gret the BEST. 

HART-WARD HARDWARE COMPANY, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Best of everything in Hardware. Satisfaction 

guaranteed or money refunded. All-right 

Cook Stoves, Celebrated Warm Air 

Heaters, the only perfect heater 

made. Write for prices. 

SHERWARD HIGGS & CO. 

Everything- in 

DRY GOODS 

RALEIGH. NORTH CAROLINA 



Advertisements. 



f . C. STRQNACH'S SONS CO., 

GROCERS 



215 FAYETTEVILLE STREET. 

FOR QUICK COOKING 
nothing: exceeds the 

GAS RANGE. 

Always ready. No dirt or ashes. 

FOR LIGHT 

TJee the Best: THE WELSBACH LIGHT 

STANDARD GAS AND ELECTRIC CO., 

124 FAYETTEVILLE ST. 

JNO. P. HAYES, Photographer. 

Kodak work of all kinds. 

Don't forget to buy your Shoes of 

S. C. POOLE'S Shoe Store. 

KING'S UP-TO-DATE DRUG STORE 

AND SODA FOUNTAIN. 
Corner Fayetteville and Hargett Streets. 

Y'ou'll find up-to-date Shoes at 

HUNTER BROS. & BREWER. 

ELLINGTON'S ART STORE, 

Raleigh, N. C. 
Everything in Art." 
Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs. 

Private Dining and Banquet Halls at 

GIERSCH'S, 216 Fayetteville St. 

THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS, Raleigh, N. C.— 
Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 

DARNELL & THOMAS, 
Pianos and Organs. 
Sheet music and small goods. 
Rat.eigh, N. C. 



KING'S GROCERY 

" The Little Store." 



M. Rosenthal & Company 



GROCERS 



136 FAYETTEVILLE STREET. 



Good things always at 

BRETSCH'S BAKERY. 

Buy ROYSTER'S Fine Candies. 

Fine Sporting Goods. 

T. C. POWELL, 

COAL AND WOOD, 

107 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 

THE J. D. RIGGAN COMPANY, 

Holiday Goods. 

WEATHERS & UTLEY, 

Art Dealers. 

MISSES REESE & COMPANY. 

Millinery. 

CALIFORNIA FRUIT STORE, 

Fruit and Confections. 

ANTICEPHALALGINE cures quickly and 
safely Headache in all its forms. 

JOLLY & WYNNE JEWELRY COMPANY 

Wedding and Holiday presents. 
Fine Watch and Jewelry repairing. 

CROWE LL'S 
DRUG STORE. 

120 Fayetteville Street. 

For the most satisfactory work, 

Try RIGGSBEE at 
Watson & Co's., Gallery. PHOTOGRAPHS. 

T. W. BLAKE, 

Rich Jewelry and Silverware. 
Repairing promptly done 



PERRY & ROSENTHAL, Trust Bldg. 
Ladies' Fine Shoes. 

Dr. V. E. TURNER, 

Dentist. 



Advertisements. 



S ALVA TORE DESIO, 

Manufacturing: Jeweler and Silversmith. 

1012 F. St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

On application will send any article selected. 
To St. Mary's, discount often per cent. 

YOUNG & HUGHES, 

Plumbers, Steam and Gas Fitters. 
121 Fayetteville Street. 



If its furnishing the Home, Office, School or 

Hall, see us. 

ROY ALL & BORDEN FURNITURE CO., 

Cor. Wilmington and Hargett Streets, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

CHARLES W. BARRETT— Architect 
Special Work in Fine Colonial Architecture. 
Author of 
"Colonial Southern Homes." 
115% Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 




ROBT. SIMPSON. 



Drugs and Perfumes, 

Toilet Articles, etc. 



JOHN C. DREWRY. 
"MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE." 

JOHNSON & JOHNSON, 

COAL, WOOD AND ICE. 

122 Fayetteville St Raleigh, N. C. 

We make your shopping with us "pleasant" 
as well as "profitable." 

A. B. STRONACH COMPANY. 

Outfitters for Ladies, Misses and Children. 

Commencement Dress Materials and Acces- 
sories — Gloves, Fans, Hosiery, Shoes,— receive 
our special attention. 

215 Fayetteville Street. 

GEO. MARSH & CO., 

Wholesale Groceries, Produce, Fruit, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



The National Ban^ of f^aleigh, 

RALEIGH, X. C. 

Capital §225,000. Surplus and Profits 8115,000. 



Chas. H Belvin, President. 

Chas. E. Johnson, Vice-President. 

F. H. Briggs, Cashier. 

J. B. Timberlake, Teller and Ass't Cashier. 



Safe Deposit Boxes in Fire and Burglar Proof 
Vault for rent at moderate cost. Absolutely 
sale place lor keeping valuables of all kind. 



Directors: 

C. M. Busbee, James A. Briggs, T. B. Crowder 

Julius Lewis, Chas. E. Johnson, F. O. Moring, 

Chas. H. Belvin, J. W. Harden, Jr. 

A . D U G H I , 

RESTAURANT AND ICE CREAM PARLOR. 

Confections, Foreign and Domestic Fruits. 

CATERER. 



St. Mary's folk know and approve of Dughi. 

STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES. 
Fruits, Vegetables and Country Pro- 
duce. The best of everything and at rock 
bottom prices. Special prices to schools and 
colleges. D. T. JOHNSON & SONS 

Phone 78. 163 Hargett St . 

H. STEIN METZ, 

FLORIST. 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns and all kinds , 

Raleigh.] of Plants. [Phone 113. 

J. S. MacDONALD & CO., Jewelers. 

Diamonds, Watches, Clocks, Silverware, 

Jewelry, Class Rings, Medals and 

Badges to order. 

217 N. Charles St. Baltimore, Md. 

HELLER'S SHOE STORE. 

GYMNASIUM SHOES. 

RALEIGH SAVINGS BANK. 
Capital 815,000 Surplus 825,000. 

Deposits over 8600,000. 
Four per cent interest paid on deposits. 

Our ECCLESIASTICAL ART Department is 

superbly equipped for the prompt and proper 
execution of fine church work such as Altars, 
Pulpits, Ledums, Prayer Desks, Litany 
Desks, Rood Screens, Fonts, and similar 
furnishings. Write for special church fur- 
niture catalogue. 

HANN-WANGERIN-WEICKHARDT CO., 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

J. R. FEEKALL & CO.— Grocers. 

Best of everything in our line. 
22 Fayetteville Street. 



Advertisements. 



SEABOARD 

AIR LINE RAILWAY. 

The Shortest and Quickest Route Between North 

and South. 

DOUBLE DAILY SERVICE from New York to Florida points, 
Norfolk, Portsmouth to Atlanta and the principal cities of the 
South. Through Pullman services New York to Jacksonville and 
Tampa; also Atlanta, with direct connections for New Orleans, 
Nashville, Birmingham, Memphis, St.Louis, and all points in Texas, 
California and Mexico. 

LOCAL SERVICES. Special attention is called to our conven- 
ient local passenger service throughout the entire system. 

For schedule to any point, rates, time-tables, pamphlets, reser- 
vations or general information, apply to ticket agents or address, 



C. H. GATTIS, T. P. A., 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



C. B. RYAN, G. P. A., 

PORTSMOUTH, VA. 



RALEIGH IRON WORKS, 

Boilers, Engines, 
Machinery, 

Raleigh, North Carolina. 


CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

At J. L. O'QUINN & CO. 

Leading Florist op North Carolina. 
Raleigh, N. C. 






ELLINGTON LUMBER COMPANY, 

All Sort of Building Supplies, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


diamonds, watches, silverware, 
H. SILVERTHORN CO. 
917 Main Street Lynchburg, Va. 
Manufacturers of College Medals, Class Rings 
and Pins. 


Patronize the 


EXCELSIOR STEAM LAUNDRY, 
FIRST-CLASS LAUNDRY WORK. 


PENN MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO. 

R. B. RANEY, General Agent, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 




GRIMES & VASS, 

Fire Insurance and Investments. 

Raleigh, N C. 


E. M. UZZELL & CO., 

PRINTERS AND BINDERS, 

ONLY HIGH GRADE WORK. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


J. SCHWARTZ, 


INSURE AGAINST LOSS BY FIRE. 

Best Companies Represented. 

Bonding Solicited 

THE MECHANICS DIME SAVINGS BANK, 

Raleigh, N. C. 


RICHMOND MARKET. 

Meats of All Kinds. 
RALEIGH, N. C. 



Location Central for the Carolina* 



Climate Healthy and Salubrious. 

T. Mary's School, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

{for girls and young women). 



G4th ANNUAL SESSION BEGINS SEPTEMBER "O, 1005. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO. TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGINS JANUARY 25. 1906. 



/ 1. THE COLLEGE. W$0§® 

OH^I \ 2. THE MUSIC 'SCHOOL,. 

of. Mary .s i 

off ens instruction in these \ 3. 7H25 BUSINESS SCHOOL. 

V 1 THE RREPARA TOR Y SCHOOL. 



Jn 1904-5 were enrolled 225 students from 16 Dioceses. 

Twenty-five Members in the faculty. 



We// Furnished, Progress'w Music Department Much Equipment New. Twenty-eight 
Pianos Mew Miller Grand Piano Just Added. ^H 

Special dtteution to the Social co-d Christi-m Side of klducclic-i without dialit 
to the scholastic training. 

For Cat tlogue and other information address 

Rev. Mt'Neely DuBose, B. S., B. D., 

REVIVOR. 






■ - • ' ■ 



fl&as, 1005 



* 




St. flfcary'e fflbuse 







IRaleiob 1H. <L 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

COMMENCEMENT NUMBER. 

Vol. IX. May, 1905. No. 10. 



Commencement Exercises. 



Sunday, May 21 

11:00 a. m., Baccalaureate Sermon 

By Rev. Chas. M. Niles, D.D., of Trinity Church, Columbia, S. C. 

Monday, May 2 2d 

3:30 p. m., Field Day Exercises 

4:00-6:00 p. m., Annual Exhibit of the Art Department 

8:15 p. m., Elocution Evening 

Tuesday, May 23 

10:00 a, m., Class Day Exercises 

4:30 p. m., Alumna^ Exercises 

8:15 p. m., Rector's Reception in Honor of Seniors 

Wednesday, May 24 

11:00 a. m., L'Etoile German 

3:30 p. m., Annual Meeting of the Trustees 

8:15 p. m., Annual Concert 

Thursday, May 25 

10:30 a. m., Graduation Exercises 

The Commencement season of 1905 is upon us. The program as 
issued is printed above ; for the sake both of those who will be here in 
person and those who will be here in thought, a little further detail may 
not be amiss that we may be ready to get the most from each exercise. 

The exercises will begin with Sunday. The Rector, assisted by some 
of the visiting clergy, will have an Early Celebration in the Chapel in 
the morning at half-past seven. At eleven Dr. Niles will deliver the 
sermon to the class. Dr. Niles is comparatively a late comer to the 
Carolinas, where he ministers in the place of the lamented Mr. Satterlee. 
He is known as an able and forceful preacher. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



On Monday afternoon it is hoped to have some Field Day Exercises 
to illustrate the athletic side of the school life, and throughout the after- 
noon the Studio will be open to visitors for an inspection of the Art 
Exhibit. In the evening Miss Balfour's pupils will entertain with an 
evening of readings and tableaux. 

On Tuesday morning the Class of '05 will hold their class day exer- 
cises, partly in the parlor and partly in the grove. The exercises prom- 
ises to be unique. At this time '05 will turn over its dignities, so far as 
is possible, to the succeeding Seniors of '06. 

At half-past four on Tuesday afternoon it is planned to have a 
special Alumna? service of thanksgiving and rejoicing at the completion 
of the Chapel work. It is hoped that every old pupil who still feels an 
interest in her Alma Mater and who can arrange to be here will be in 
attendance at this service and make it a memorable one. It will be 
very simple in itself, but may be made a great blessing. At these ser- 
vices, as well as all others held in the Chapel, it will be a matter for 
sincere rejoicing that there is now space enough for all and that all may 
find place who will. 

After this service the Alumnse Association will meet in annual 
session. The President will preside, the Rector will greet the guests, of 
whom it is hoped there will be a large attendance, reports from the 
various chapters will be heard, and the routine business transacted. This 
is the twenty-fifth anniversary of the foundation of the Association and 
the members should be present in force. 

At night the Rector and Mrs. DuBose will give a reception in honor 
of the graduating class, to the Trustees and other officers of the school, 
the Class of 1906 and the visiting Alumnae. 

On Wednesday at eleven the girls will meet for the last of their social 
functions of the year, when the L'Etoile German Club will entertain 
the Tau Deltas in a Morning German. 

At half-past three the Trustees will meet in annual session, and at 
the same hour the different college classes will have their final meetings 
to say farewell and to elect officers for the coming year. 

Wednesday evening the Annual Concert of the Music Department 
will be given. This year the Junior Concert on Monday night has been 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



abandoned and undivided effort will be concentrated on the Wednesday- 
Concert, which, will doubtless be a treat. 

Thursday morning come the final exercises, when the graduation exer- 
cises of the Class of '05, beginning in the parlor, will be concluded by 
the Chapel services. 

We feel that there is no need to assure our friends that we would like 
to have them, one and all, with us throughout the Commencement, and 
we hope that as many as can will be here. For the sake of those who 
cannot a full account of the Commencement will be given in the next 
issue of The Muse, which will appear in June. 



Benedicite. 



The smooth, cool green of the campus stretched peacefully out to meet 
the golden bars of the brilliant Southern sunset. Tiny flecks of sunny 
light filtered through the green lace work branches of the venerable oak 

trees, which half concealed the white-columned portico of the 

building from the eyes of passersby. In the little ivy-covered summer 
house, standing in bold relief against the sunset glow, Marjorie Daley — 
the college favorite — sat, her head bowed in deep thought upon the 
iron fretwork of the railing. At her feet a huge bunch of American 
Beauties — the gift of her latest "crush" — made a bright splash of color 
against the sheer whiteness of her daintv flounces. 

"What will the girls say ?" she thought ; the adoring, worshipping 
girls who had showered her with proofs of their undying devotion since 
the opening of school. Then what would the Faculty say ? They had 
expected so much of her. She could not bear to think of it, yet. she 
really wanted to do it; but could she? How much easier it would be 
to go on receiving honor upon honor, than to yield one minute to this 
new thought. It had come upon her so suddenly, only last, night, as she 
passed through the East Corridor and heard Nita Kenyon sobbing piti- 
fully in the semi-darkness. "You can never understand how bitter it is, 
Marjorie," she had cried, "Mother has worked her fingers to the bone 
that I might have these four years at school, and how I have studied 
and planned and prayed that I might become valedictorian and in some 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



measure repay her. She would be, oh, so proud of me. Then an old 
friend of father's has promised me a position if I do it, and dear mother 
might rest her weary hands and tired brain. But I heard to>-day that 
some one else had surpassed me; oh, how can I give it up; it is so 1 — 
so, very hard." The pitiful little wail seemed to float out to Marjorie 
now, through the soft, glowing light. The cool afternoon breeze, the 
clear bird voices, and the chime of chapel bells all re-echoed the longing 
appeal of IsTita's voice. Then the solemn chant of the Benedicite floated 
out on the soft May air — "Praise the Lord, O my soul : and forget not 
all His benefits." Had she forgotten His benefits, could not she do 
something to show Him that she was willing to' give as. well as to receive. 
How selfish she had always been — always crying for more praise, more 
honor, more pleasure, and never thinking of others. Softly she arose 
and slipped unnoticed into the office; upon the desk lay the general 
average cards of the senior class. Slowly she drew the card bearing her 
name from the pack, and, with a skilful, twist of the pen, changed her 
own average to a number two points lower than IsTita's. "Dear, fatherly 
Dr. Hall is so absent-minded," she murmured, a he will have forgotten 
already." 

The baccalaureate sermon was over, so was field day, class day, the 
grand concert, and Commencement day. The shock of Marjorie's fail- 
ure to win the coveted honor had become the one question of Com- 
mencement week among her devotees. They were inclined to blame the 
Faculty for unfairness in marks, and many were the indignant speeches 
made during the week by Marjorie's various "crushes," as they calmly 
nibbled chocolates and formed themselves into accusing groups. But 
now trunks and suit cases were piled in hopeless confusion along the 
passageways, and the roll of departing carriages echoed again and again 
down the long, white driveway. As Marjorie's carriage passed another, 
she caught a glimpse of ]STita's mother, a frail, toil-worn little woman, 
whose refined face and deep grey eyes shone like a star against the 
threadbare black of her gown. 

"I shall never regret it," Marjorie murmured, "for I have every- 
thing and she such a few blessings, and it was really a very little thing 
to do after all." "What dear" ? asked a chorus of girlish voices. "Oh, 



The St. Mary's Muse. 5 

nothing; I was merely — " Then the puff and grind of the railway 
station drowned the sound of her voice in its noisy confusion, and the 
carriage was breathlessly vacated, at the trainman's hoarse cry — "No. 
51, Fast Mail, fourth track, leaves in five minutes." 

Harslet Webster. 

Public Life of the Month. 

PIA^ T RECITAL. 

On the evening of Saturday, April 15, the pupils of Miss Kate Mor- 
ton Laxton gave an interesting exhibition of the year's work in piano. 
They showed skillful and careful training, playing with intelligence and 
clearness, and some with real musical taste and feeling. The program 
was as follows : 

Pink Lichner. 

Constance Bainbridge 

Hunting Scene — Valse, (For Two Pianos) Gurlitt 

Margaret Eldridge (First Piano) 

On the Meadow Schytte 

Tulip Lichner 

Mildred Goodwin 

Valse Dennee 

Grace Whitaker 

Will o' the Wisp Jungmann 

Mart Alexander 

Elfin Dance Heins 

Beatrice Cohen 

Valse Espagnol Beaumont 

Nellie Durham 

Scherzo, F Major Kullak 

Helen Liddell 

Menuett, Op. 100 Ravina 

Virginia Mhler 

Barcarolle Ehrlich 

Jessie Harris 

Polonaise Brilliante Merkel 

Blanche Thompson 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



BASKET-BALL. 

We went to press last month amid rejoicing at the result of the first 
game of basket-ball with the Baptist University. We have stopped 
rejoicing for the present. The second game, played on Easter Monday, 
proved a Waterloo for St. Mary's. Mr. Knox, of the A. and M. College, 
had carefully coached our team in the interval after the first game, and 
the girls had shown a good deal of enthusiasm, but when the game came 
. . . The girls from B. TJ. W. played well and showed marked im- 
provement over their playing in the first contest. 

This was enough basket-ball for this year for us, but we hope that in 
the future we may play with better results. It was a pleasure at this 
occasion to have a large party from the Baptist University and a party 
from Peace with us to enjoy the game. 

The teams played thus : 

B. U. W. St. Mary's. 

Withers Center V. Glazebrook. 

Fleming Side-Center K. Glazebrook. 

S. T'omlinson 1 f J. Carson. 

t^t „ Y Forwards ■{ n T ,.,. 

Johnson j ( C. Klingensmith. 

K. Futrell ) n c M. Walker. 



T Guards < T ^ 

Josey j i J. Boylan. 

Goals from field: B. U. W., 7; St. Mary's, 1. Goals from fouls: B. U. W., 2; 
St. Mary's, 4. 

Referee: Mr. Wilson. Umpires: Mr. Kienholtz and Mr. Knox. 



THE ISTTER-SOCIETY DEBATE. 

"Resolved, That the indiscriminate education of all classes is pro- 
ductive neither of discontent nor evil to the individual or to society." 

This was the subject for discussion when on the night of Wednesday, 
April 26th the champions of the Sigma Lambda and the Epsilon Alpha 
Pi Literary Societies met for their fourth annual contest. 

Eor weeks the representatives of the two societies had put forth 
every effort to keep this debate up to the standard of its forerunners. 
The debate is one of the events of the year at St. Mary's and no higher 
honor falls to the student than the privilege to speak for her Society in 
the annual contest. The contestants this year were quite up to the stand- 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



ard. Their papers were admirable, one and all. In each the subject was 
treated clearly and logically, and each was delivered in a forceful way. 

Last year the Epsilon Alpha Pi broke the record of victories which 
the Sigma Lambda had scored. This year great was the joy of one party 
and deep the distress of the other when the judges rendered their de- 
cision for Sigma Lambda, the negative. 

Miss Rena Clark, '05, of Tarboro, opened the debate for the affirma- 
tive and was followed by Miss Ellen Gibson, '05, of Concord. Miss 
Elmer George, of Xew Bern, followed for the Epsilon Alpha Pi, and 
the set debate was concluded by Miss Anna Clark, '05, of Scotland Xeck. 
The speakers then rejoined in five minute talks and the debate was sub- 
mitted. 

The judges were Hon. Judge Hoke, of the Supreme Court Bench, Mr. 
J. R. Young, State Commissioner of Insurance, and Prof. D. H .Hill, 
of the A. and M. College. 



CERTIFICATE RECITAL. 

The second of the year's recitals of pupils who are candidates for 
music certificates in May was given on the evening of April 27 by Miss 
Catherine Hampton, of Elorida, pupil of Miss Pixley, and Misses Xora 
Edmonston, of Savannah, and Cad Hervey, of Raleigh, pupils of Mr. 
Sanbom, in Piano, and Miss Winifred Ross Massey, of Raleigh, pupil 
of Mrs. Sanborn, in Yocal. Miss Ellen Durham, of Raleigh, another of 
Mrs. Sanborn's pupils, was prevented by sickness from taking her part 
in the program 

The numbers of the following program were all well rendered : 

a Elfin Dance Liebling 

b Nocturne No. 2 Meyer Helmund 

Nora Lawson Ed:.ionston 

The Wanderer Schubert 

Winifred Ross Massey 

a Scottish Legend Mrs. Beach 

b Gondoliera Liszt 

c Tarantella Nicode 

Catherine Macy Hampton 

The Daily Question Meyer Helmund 

Winifred Ross Massey 



8 The St. Mary's Muse. 

a Serenade No. 3 Rubinstein 

b Nocturne, Op. 18, No. 2 Karganoff 

c Preludes in D Minor and D-flat Major Chopin 

Cad Clopton Hervey 



"THE ROSE AND PEARL." 

The Chorus Class of St. Mary's gave the charming operetta, "The 
Rose and Pearl," on the evening of Saturday, April 29. The careful 
training which had been given the class, and the earnest work they had 
done showed in every detail. The stage in the parlor was transformed 
into a forest peopled by a throng of dancing, whirling, singing fairies, 
and their dread opposites, — gaunt, withered, screeching witches, while 
the presence of two mortals made the whole seem more real. 

It was the first entertainment of the kind this year, and was well 
sung and greatly enjoyed. Ella Croft, in the leading part, was espe- 
cially good. The credit for the musical training is due toi Mrs. and Miss 
Sanborn, and for the stage training to Miss Lee and Miss Fenner. 

The cast was as follows : 

Florinda, a Little Village Maiden Ella Croft 

Fortunia, Fairy Queen Selma Thorn 

Vala, Queen of the Witches Margaret Sanborn 

Yoringal, Sister of Florinda Kate Winslow 

First Fairy Margaret Eldridge 

Second Fairy Nora Edmonston 

First Witch Emma Barnwell 

Second Witch Ethel Ellenwood 

DANCING FAIRIES. 

Virginia Glazebrook Kate Glazebrook 

Annie Sloane Margaret Eldridge 

Annie Wells Olive Morrill 

Alice Davis Mattie Hunter 

Chorus of Witches, Fairies, etc. 
Scene — A Forest Time — Present 



GRADUATES' RECITAL. 

On the evening of Thursday, May 4, the recital of the graduates in 
the department of vocal and violin was thoroughly enjoyed by a large 
and appreciative audience. The Diploma pupils taking part were Ger- 



The St. Mary's Muse. 9 

trude Sanborn in Violin, and Margaret Sanborn and Mrs. Weihe in 

Vocal. 

In the words of one of our dailies : 

The whole program was a choice blend of rich tones artistically grouped and 
varied with all the natural colors of truth. Miss Margaret Sanborn sang the 
aria from Jeanne D'Arc with much dramatic force, perfect intonation and thor- 
ough appreciation of the musical requirements. In the songs of the two Ameri- 
can composers her interpretation was characteristic, enunciation distinct and 
voice well placed and well controlled. Mrs. Weihe in the Sclavonic song of 
Chaminade showed her wide range of two octaves, a thorough voice control, ex- 
cellent intonation and a fine quality of tone color. Her American selections 
were exquisite in their dainty finish, naive rendering and beautiful contrasts 
from pianissimo to forte. Miss Gertrude Sanborn in the de Beriot concerto 
played with a full, rich tone, a broad grasp of the musical subjects both in 
phrasing and coloring, and brilliant technique. The double stopping was well 
executed and good in tone and tune. The "Spring Song" was fragrant with 
fresh blooms and the Hungarian Dance pulsated with the wild strains of the 
Eastern folk rhythm, which was rendered with a dash and abandon and an ease 
of bowing so necessary for the proper interpretation of a piece of this character. 
Perhaps nowhere in the South can be found better teachers in violin and vocal 
music than those now at St. Mary's. Miss Mattie Hunter, as accompanist, was 
sympathetic, and in her piano selections rendered most artistically the two 
pieces so greatly contrasted, both in theme and treatment. 

The program was as follows : 

Recitative and Aria from Jeanne D'Arc — 

"Farewell ye Mountains" Tschaikowsky 

Margaret Longfellow Sanborn 

Concerto No. 9 

Allegro-Maestoso de Beriot 

Adagio 
Rondo 

Gertrude Elaine Sanborn 

Slavonic Song Chaminade 

Mrs. Weihe 

Reverie Strauss 

Mattie Caroline Hunter 

a Grasses and Roses Bartlett 

b When Love is in Her Eyes Cole 

Margaret Longfellow Sanborn 

March Grotesque Sinding 

Mattie Caroline Hunter 

The Venetian Regatta Rossini 

Margaret Longfellow Sanborn and Mrs. Weihe 

2 



10 The St. Mary's Muse. 

a To the Spring Grieg 

b Hungarian Dance Haesche 

Gertrude Elaine Sanborn 

a Thy Beaming Eyes MacDowell 

b Stolen Wings Willeby 

Mrs. Weihe 



ANNUAL APPEARANCE OF THE DRAMATIC CLUB. 

The production of "The Little Rebel" by the Dramatic Club of St. 
Mary's on the evening of Saturday, May 6th, was a thoroughly enjoy- 
able bit of amateur acting. Long before time the house was crowded, 
and the play has been pronounced by many the best thing given at St. 
Mary's during the year. 

The comedy is overflowing with fun, and the actresses in their several 
parts brought out the good points of the play in a way that reflected 
much credit on them and highly delighted the audience. Jean Carson, 
as the widow who wishes to appear exceedingly young, and Susie Carter, 
as the daughter, both acted cleverly. Dorothy Hughson and Gertrude 
Sullivan were both very attractive as men. Vivacity and charm were 
requisites for Ellen Gibson in her part, and she more than measured up 
to the demands upon her. 

The cast was : 

Mrs. Wingrove Jean Carson. 

Laura Wingrove .... Susie Carter. 

Stephen Poppincourt ............. Dorothy Hughson. 

Arthur Ormiston. Gertrude Sullivan. 

Kittie, the Maid Ellen Gibson. 

Much praise is due Miss Balfour for the excellent manner in which 
she directed the play. 



SENIOR RECEPTIONS. 

The first social event after Easter was a reception given the Senior 
Class by Mossie Long and Florence Grant, Saturday evening, April 29. 
The feature of the evening was making words out of the letters in the 
word "Mediterranean." Margaret DuBose, making the greatest num- 



The St. Mary's Muse. 11 

ber of words, won the first prize, an ivory-stick fan, and Mrs. Sanborn 
won the booby, an A. B. C. book of words. 

After the garne delicious refreshments were served. 

On Mondav nio-ht, Mav 1, the Senior and Junior Classes of St. 
Mary's attended a reception given by the Junior Class of the A. and M. 
College, the occasion being the presentation of the cup to the Junior 
Class for surpassing the other classes in foot-ball. Interesting speeches 
were made by several of the Professors of the college and students of 
the Class of '06, after which an hour or more of social intercourse was 
delightfully spent. 

On Tuesday night, May 2, it was easy for us to forget we were serious 
when we went to Ellen Gibson and Dorothy Hughson's May -Day baby 
party, dressed as babies. Games suitable for children were played; a 
May-pole was wrapped in red, white and blue, and "Drop the handker- 
chief," "King William," "Ring a-round the Roses," and "London 
Bridge" gave an occasion for one more merry romp. Margaret Mackay, 
an honorary guest, was crowned Queen of the May, while Mamie Ros- 
sell, dressed in a sailor-suit, and known as "Tommy," won the prize for 
being the cutest child. Refreshments, of which all our mothers would 
have approved, were seiwed, among them cakes in which we found 
some prophecy of our future. 

Then, on Saturday afternoon, May 6, Linda Tillinghast gave a de- 
lightful card-party at the home of her cousin, Mrs. !N~. S. West, on 
Bloodworth street. Since cards in the school is forbidden, the game, six- 
hand euchre, was especially enjoyable. The score-cards were very 
attractive, having the class flower, the Jacqueminot Rose, painted on 
them. Mamie Rossell won the first prize, while the booby fell to Mossie 
Long. After the game delightful refreshments were seiwed. 



THE JUXIOR AUXILIARY. 

The annual meeting of the Junior Auxiliary of St. Mary's was held 
in the parlor on Sunday evening, May 6th. Miss McKimmon, the Di- 
rectress, presided and Mrs. Iredell, the Honorary President, was present 
and addressed the united Chapters. 



12 The St. Mary's Muse. 

The service was opened by the Rector with prayer and the Creed, and 
then reports of the work of each Chapter were read by the secretaries. 
These reports showed a very flo'iirishing condition of the organization. 
A summary of the reports is given below : 

REPORT OF THE YEAR'S WORK OF THE JUNIOR AUXILIARY. 

To Aldert Smedes Scholarship, Shanghai $30.00 

Bennett Smedes scholarship, Thompson Orphanage 30.00 

United Offering 6.00 

Church Periodical Club 6.00 

Apportionment 5.10 

Central Fund 5.10 

Chapel Carpet 69.25 

Pyramids 65 . 34 

$216.79 

Boxes — 

Thompson Orphanage. (St. Elizabeth's Chapter) $4.50 

Morganton Mission School. (St. Monica's) $4.50 

St. Savior's Chapel. (St. Anne's) 4.50 

St. Savior's Chapel. ( St. Monica's) 2 . 00 

Asheville. (St. Etheldreda's) 12.00 

$25.00 

St. Etheldreda's Chapter as a memorial to their first Direct- 
ress, Mrs. Lucy Randolph Bratton — a brass credence-table 
in St. Mary's Chapel 50 . 00 

Total contributions for year $291.79 



School Notes. 



Mary Rossell spent, Palm Sunday in Hillsboro. 

Miss Cheekley spent the first Sunday in May with friends in Chapel 
Hill. 

Mary Hunter stopped in Raleigh to spend Easter on her 1 return trip 
from Florida. 

Mary Pruden, after visiting Sue Clark in Tarboro, made a visit to 
friends in Raleigh. 

Among the old girls expected Commencement are Minnie Burgwyn, 
Nannie Smith, Louise Evans, Mary Graves, Rosalie Bernhardt, Mary 
Welles, Kitty Coleman, Carrie Helen Moore, Rebecca Cushman. 



The St. Masy's Muse. 13 

Margaret Stedrnan, '04, and Juliet Crews attended the Virginia-Caro- 
lina game at Greensboro. 

At the meeting of the Epsilon Alpha Pi Literary Society, held for the 
purpose of electing a president for 1905-'06, Miss Gertrude Sullivan, 
'06, of Savannah, Ga., was chosen to that place. The other officers will 
not he elected until the fall. 

Mr. DuBose attended the Educational Association in Columbia, S. C, 
and the Diocesan Convention in Camden. During his absence the Rev. 
H. B. Deane, of Greensboro, on Sunday, April 30, had afternoon service 
in the Chapel. 

The Easter services were lovely. The Chapel had been very effec- 
tively decorated, and everything was in harmony with the day. At the 
morning service the Hector dedicated the Credence Table and the 
Candle-sticks, memorials lately added to the Chapel furnishings. At 
the evening service a number of visitors from the city were present to 
worship with us. 

Monday, May 8, Miss Fannie Hines Johnson entertained the mem- 
bers of the Kappa Delta Fraternity at an elaborate luncheon at her 
beautiful home in Raleigh. The Kappa Deltas enjoyed themselves thor- 
oughly. The dining-room was beautifully decorated with green and 
white, the fraternity colors, and the place-cards were tied to Bride roses, 
the fraternity flower. 

St. Mary's was well represented at the Virginia-Carolina baseball 
game at Chapel Hill, May 4. Emmie Drewry, Maria Webb, Jane Ire- 
dell Green, Marguerite Walker, Blandina Springs, Marguerite Springs, 
Loula McDonald, Willa ]STorris, Mary Ella Moore and Gertrude Wins- 
ton attended the game, while Gertrude Winston, Loula McDonald, Willa 
Morris and Mary Ella Moore remained over for the dance. 

Gertrude Winston has been at her home in Durham several times 
during April and May, and on May 1 entertained the Phi Delta Chap- 
ter of the Kappa Delta Sorority at an elaborate ten-course luncheon. A 
May-pole, wrapped with the white and green of the order, was the 
center decoration, and the souvenirs were green baskets filled with lilies- 
of-the-valley. Miss Bertha Holt, of Burlington, a Kappa Delta from 
Kinston, was one of the guests. 



14 The St. Mary's Muse. 

Palm Sunday afternoon Bishop 1 Cheshire made his annual visitation 
to St. Mary's and confirmed a class of thirteen. The threatening April 
weather cleared toward the afternoon and many visitors were with us 
to join in the sweet services. The comfort of the larger chapel was 
fully appreciated. The Bishop was not well enough to address the con- 
firmation class, but the service was as usual full of interest and sol- 
emnity. 

A great many of the students spent Easter at their homes. Naturally, 
it was doubly pleasant for them, and also it was a lovely Easter for the 
girls at St. Mary's. The profusion of dogwood and ivy and a great 
many Easter lilies made the new chapel especially pretty for its first 
Easter service. The new altar furnishings, two encharistic candle- 
sticks, presented by the Upsilon Delta Society, and two seven-branch 
candle-sticks, given by the Altar Guild, added much to the beauty of the 
decorations. 

The annual, Kappa Delta banquet will be given at the school on the 
night of May 13th. A number of non-resident members are expected. 
Eull accounts of this banquet and of those of the Gamma Beta Sigma 
and Upsilon Delta, which which will be held Commencement week, will 
appear in the next Muse. 

At the annual election of officers, held on the afternoon of May 3rd, 
the following were chosen as the officers for the coming year : 

President — Virginia Bailey, '06, Wilmington; Vice-President — Sue Prince, '07, 
Wilmington; Recording Secretary — Mary Ella Moore, Wilmington; Correspond- 
ing Secretary — Jane Iredell Green, '06, Wilmington; Treasurer — Emily Garrison, 
'07, Camden; Critic — Josephine Boylan, '06, Raleigh; Historian, Grace Whitaker, 
'07, Winston; Tellers. — Blandina Springs, '08, Charlotte, and Helen Strange, '08, 
Wilmington. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 15 



Alma Mater. 



A School Song: Tune: "Believe me if all those enduring young charms." 

St. Mary's ! wherever thy daughters may be, 

They love thy high praises to sing. 
And tell of thy beauties of campus and tree 

Around which sweet memories cling. 
They may wander afar, out of reach of thy name ; 

Afar, out of sight of thy grove, 
But the thought of St. Mary's aye kindles a flame 

Of sweet recollections and love. 

Beloved St. Mary's ! how great is our debt ! 

Thou hast cared for thy daughters full well; 
They can never thy happy instructions forget, 

Nor fail of thy virtues to tell. 
The love that they feel is a heritage pure ; 

An experience wholesome and sweet. 
Through fast rolling years it will grow and endure ; 

Be a lamp and a guide to their feet. 

May the future unite all the good of thy past 

With the best that new knowledge can bring. 
Ever onward and upward thy course ! To the last 

Be thou steadfast in every good thing. 
Generations to come may thy fair daughters still 

Fondly think on thy halls and thy grove 
And carry thy teachings — o'er woodland and hill — 

Of earnestness, wisdom, and love. II. E. H. 



16 



The St. Mary's Muse. 



IN MEMORIAM. 



Again this month all friends of St. Mary's are called to 
lament the death of two more of her most faithful and be- 
loved daughters. 

On Monday, April 24th, entered into rest at Raleigh, after 
a lingering illness, Mrs. Isaac Dortch, of Goldsboro, in girl- 
hood days of Raleigh, herself a St. Mary's girl and the 
mother of three St. Mary's girls. 

Lucy Hogg, daughter of the late Dr. Thos. D. Hogg and Janet 
Bryan, of Raleigh, was a native of Raleigh, spending her school days 
at St. Mary's and her life in her native town until her marriage to 
Mr. Isaac Dortch, of Goldsboro. She was the mother of three sons 
and five daughters, of whom the three eldest, Misses Sallie, Janet and 
Ellen Dortch, are also aluinnas of St. Mary's. 




The St. Mary's Muse. 17 



IN MEMORIAM. 

On Thursday, April 27th, at Durham, entered into rest 
Mrs. Lucy Battle Cobb, of Chapel Hill, formerly of Raleigh, 
a graduate and first valedictorian of St. Mary's, and a life- 
long earnest friend of the school. 

Lucy Plummer Battle, daughter of Hon. R. H. Battle, of Raleigh, 
was born in Raleigh in 1861. She spent her girlhood in Raleigh and 
received all her education at St. Mary's, where she graduated with 
the Class of '79, the first class to formally graduate from the school. 
From the time of her graduation she was a most interested member 
of the Alumnae, and was ever ready to help in any move for the 
advancement of the interests of the school, lending her presence and 
her counsel to every meeting. In May, 1904, she became the wife of 
Prof. Collier Cobb, of the University of North Carolina, and is now 
in the prime of her days called to her reward. 

We may be permitted to repeat from the heart the words of her 
co-workers in the Church of the Good Shepherd, Raleigh. 

"It is no ordinary person for whom we wish to express our love 
and esteem, for very extraordinary was her devotion, her self-renun- 
ciation, her entire consecration of her life to duty, and loving ser- 
vice. From her childhood, mother as well as sister and daughter in 
her bereaved home, she was lovely and patient in that home life, 
constant and earnest in every duty, faithful and strong in all good 
work; in her love for the church, happy and eager to offer her will- 
ing service wherever and whenever needed, for none were too poor, 
none too lowly to receive her Christian sympathy and help. In the 
Sunday-school, and in the choir, where her voice was so full of 
praise and joyful worship, it was an inspiration, an example to all. 
In every church organization, in every work of charity, she was 
among the foremost. 

"To these facts there is 'a cloud of witnesses' among us who knew 
and loved her." 



::....-■■.. ... .,-.,... ■. ..■, ■., ... ...:, 



SEE 



The St. Mary's Muse. 

Subscription, One Year. = = = = One Dollar. 

Single Copies, = = = = - Fifteen Cents. 

A Magazine published monthly except in EDITORIAL STAFF 

July and August at St. Mary's School, Raleigh, Anna B C]ark Editor inChlef 

N. C, in the interest of the students and Margaret DuBose 1 

Alumnae, under the editorial management of Sadie M. Jenkins_Y"""I } Literary Editors. 

the Senior Class. Ida P. Evans Social Editor. 

Address all communications and send all Linda Tillin°-hast~~ j ^ocal Editors, 

subscriptions to Rena H clark Exchange Editor. 

THE ST. MARY'S MUSE, Erne C. Fairley ) 

„ . Florence Grant V Associate Editors. 

kaleigh, n. c. Mossie Long j 

Mary E. Rossell Business Manager. 

Ellen P. Gibson. 



correspondence from friends solicited. Dorothy M. Hughson J Editors on Ads, 

Application made at the post-office at Raleigh, for admission to the mail as second-class matter 

Editorials. 



May — Commencement — Home ! It has come at Last, this month 
which means so mnch to all school girls. Plans for Commencement are 
the leading topics of conversation. Examinations, which mean the "be- 
ginning of the end," stare us in the face. Perhaps those examinations 
will not be such dreadful things after all. When they are over the 
Freshmen will no longer be a class at which all the jokes may be aimed 
and upon which all the blame can be heaped, but will begin to show 
symptoms of the Sophomore instinct. The Sophomores will be one step 
nearer the coveted goal as they slip into their places as Juniors ; the 
Juniors will, be ready to proudly assume the places we leave vacant. 

By far the saddest time is for the Senior. Her school days with 
all the happiness that St. Mary's brings, will soon be only a. memory. 
A few more class-meetings, one more Muse meeting, and the twenty- 
sixth of May will find us enrolled among the graduates. Year by year 
it is thus. Year by year the Seniors are obliged to accept the same 
conditions. With our predecessors we must be prepared to cry, "The 
Seniors are dead, long live the Seniors !" 



And now, in this May number of the Muse, the last copy which the 
class of 1905 will publish, we wish to thank our readers for the help 



The St. Mary's Muse. 19 

and encouragement which they have given us. We hegan the project of 
publishing a monthly Muse with nothing to count on except the loyalty 
of the friends of St. Mary's. Those friends have proved that our confi- 
dence was not misplaced. The Muse, while it claims no value from a 
literary standpoint, has endeavored as far as possible to keep the alumnae 
and old girls in touch with the school and with each other. We have 
failed often to do all. that might possibly have been done, but we hope 
that each year the Editors, profiting by the experience of the Board 
which come before them, will make the Muse grow nearer and nearer 
our ideal of a news-magazine worthy of the school. 



FAREWELL, ST MART'S! 



There have been times in the past, we know, 
When we eagerly longed for that happy day 

Toward which all our toils and labors go, 
When with home-turned faces we could say, 
"Farewell, St. Mary's !" 



"■} 



But now as the day draws swiftly near 
There comes another feeling too. 

Somehow everything seems more dear 
When its being taken away from you — 
'Farewell, St. Mary's!" 



(^ 



St. Mary's ! What volumes in that one name ! 

It has been our very life in the past, 
To many more it will be the same — 

But — our final parting has come at last ! 
"Farewell, St. Mary's !" 

We are leaving the days of our school life behind — 

Yes, with all their hearty endeavor. 
Before us untrodden our life-path winds, 

As we say, perhaps forever — 

"Farewell, St. Mary's!" 

M. R. DuB., '05. 



20 The St. Mary's Muse. 

How much it would please the workers on The Muse to feel that a 
larger proportion of the Alumnae held the. same feeling which our never- 
failing friend, Esther Means, '04, now of Atlanta, expresses in a recent 
letter. She writes : "I have enjoyed reading each number of 'the little 
Muse' twice as much as the one before, and look forward eagerly to 
receiving such satisfying news of St, Mary's through the coming year. 
I have heard the paper criticized for its lack of literary elements, but I 
think the way it tells us of what is going on, is what makes it so very 
welcome to all true 'ex-Saints.' Please keep it the newspaper of St. 
Mary's." 

L'Envoi of the Authors. 



CAROLYN WELLS IN THE BOOKMAN. 

When earth's last book has been printed and the types are twisted and 

pied, 
When the Smallest Maynard has perished and the Littlest Brown has 

died, 
We shall rest, and, faith, we shall need it, for The Century, a,t best 
Till the Houghtons cease from. Mifflin and the Scribners are at rest. 
And those that were good shall be Harpers; they shall sit with the 

Putnam chaps, 
And write on Doubleday Pages, or an L. C. Page, perhaps ; 
They shall have real Britons to draw from — Macmillan and Kegan 

Paul ; 
They shall wait an age for their statements, and never get tired at all ! 
And only McClure shall praise us, and only McClurg shall bless ; 
And no one shall write for an Agent, and none for a Private Press. 
But each for the joy of writing, and each in his separate star 
Shall write the book as he sees it, for the Dodd of Meads as they are ! 



All Aboard! 



Bill had a billboard. Bill also had a board bill. The board bill 
bored Bill so that Bill sold the billboard to> pay his board bill. So after 
Bill sold his billboard to pay for his board bill the board bill no longer 
bored Bill. — Yale Expositor. 



ALUMNAE MATTERS 

Communications and Correspondence Solicited. 
St. Mary's Alumnae Association. 



President, - - Mrs. Mary Iredell, Raleigh. 

IMrs. M. T. Leak, Durham. 
Mrs. I. M. Pittenger, Raleigh, 
Mrs. P. P. Tucker, Raleigh, 
Mrs.Kate de R. Meares, Wilmington. 

Sec.-Treas., - Miss Kate McKimmon, St. Mary's. 



Mrs. Mary Iredell: A Tribute. 



The new Chapel, or rather the old Chapel enlarged, is now complete 
and is ready to open its doors in welcome, not only to the whole student 
body, boarders and day pupils, but also to friends and visitors, and on 
the day appointed for the special service of thanksgiving it is 
hoped that all in Raleigh who are interested may be present to rejoice 
together. This work was undertaken by the Alumna? last June, and 
with the exception of one or two large gifts, such as the chancel from 
the Jurisdiction of Asheville, a considerable gift from Durham and 
several special memorials, the money has been and is being paid in 
small sums sent by many members of the Alumnae or given by friends 
and relatives in memory of some dear one who loved St. Mary's and 
held the Chapel sacred. And so this new building stands as a silent 
memorial of the devotion of St. Mary's daughters. 

Behind every work accomplished there is apt to be some one person 
who inspires it and by singleness of purpose and untiring zeal brings 
about its completion. And so our thoughts turn naturally at this time 
to the present President of the Alumnae, Mrs. Iredell. Perhaps no one 
name appeals to so large a number of St. Mary's girls. It is widely 
known throughout the Southern States, and wherever known it stands 
for loyalty and service to St. Mary's. "Honor to whom honor is due," 
and no more fitting time than this could be found in which to express 
the appreciation of Mrs. Iredell's far-reaching influence in the varying 
capacities of dearly loved daughter, teacher, lady principal, representa- 
tive, and president of the Alumnae. 

Mrs. Iredell's father was Dr. Chas. E. Johnson, of Raleigh, a man 
of note in his profession ; her mother was Emily Skinner, of Edenton. 



22 The St. Mary's Muse. 

Mrs. Iredell was at St. Mary's as a •school girl from 1847 to 1855, and 
left behind her a noble record as student, lady and friend. In 1859 
she married Mr. Campbell Iredell and made her home in Raleigh. In 
1863 Capt. Iredell met a bra^e death on the battle field at Gettysburg, 
his last act being one of unselfish consideration for the welfare of a 
dying comrade. Their one child, a boy of one and one-half years, had 
died some months before and at twenty-five Mrs. Iredell found herself 
with her heart stunned, the light of life gone out and a waste of years 
before her. It was then, at, the suggestion of Dr. Aldert Smedes, a man 
of tact and gentleness and a keen judge of character, that she came to 
St. Mary's as a member of the Faculty to begin life anew. From that 
time until the death of Dr. Aldert Smedes, she was faithful to her 
post at St. Mary's, giving the school the benefit of wise judgment, 
good teaching, and refined influence and the Rector the further help of 
one whose heart was in the work. 

When Dr. Bennett Smedes took the school he turned naturally to 
Mrs. Iredell as his father's valued friend and one who would value and 
preserve the traditions and help "to hold up his hands" in the great 
work which had fallen to him,. A lady who was at St. Mary's during 
all the years Mrs. Iredell taught there gives it as her opinion that no 
teacher ever exerted a more universal and healthful influence over 
young girls. There was nothing of that sentimentality which so often 
tinges the relation between a school girl and a popular teacher, but 
while inviting ease and confidence, her influence was 1 bracing and 
tended always to the development of character — it was that of a wise 
mother with her daughter. Out of school hours her interest in the 
girls did not cease, and many a woman with a family of her own, can 
trace her interest in sewing and embroidery and in the art of "making 
pretty things" back to Mrs. Iredell's evening Reading Class. She 
declined to "read to empty hands" and planned and directed many a 
piece of fancy work, which was the pride of the worker and the delight 
of her family, who had previously had no reason to suspect the hidden 
talent. Her bright room, softly radiating refinement and comfort, was 
as a well of fresh springs to many a weary school girl who went in 
homesick and discouraged, and came out with a higher ideal of life and 
a heart for the duties of the moment. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 23 



In September, 1899, Mrs. Iredell was made Lady Principal of St. 
Mary's, which position she resigned in January following, on account 
of the death of her sister, whose family of young children she took 
in charge, making her home with them in Asheville. For several years 
her immediate connection with the school was severed, though her inter- 
est in it never faltered, but it was renewed when she returned, in 
November, '96, to make her home in Raleigh with her brother, Mr. 
Chas. E. Johnson. Dr. Smedes had given the school into the hands of 
the Diocese, whose first act was to purchase the school property, which 
up to this time had been rented from the Camerons. The Bishop 
asked Mrs. Iredell to accept the position of representative and agent 
for St. Mary's to solicit funds and patronage for the school. Perhaps 
no severer test could have been found for her loyalty. She had been 
tenderly nurtured, brought up in the old ways when women were not 
accustomed to travel alone and were never heard speaking in public, and 
her life at St. Mary's had but been a life in a larger family. Her heart 
misgave her and she shrank from the task. But she undertook the work, 
and we hear of her first public speech being made in church in Char- 
lotte at a meeting of the Brotherhood of St. Andrew, when as she 
turned to address the Brotherhood they rose to a man, to do homage 
to her gentle womanhood. Having undertaken the work she did it with 
her might at all times, with unabating energy and zeal, with the result 
that she succeeded in raising a goodly part of the purchase-money and 
in establishing St. Mary's Guilds through the country, which have been 
valuable aids both to the Purchase fund and to the Alumnae fund. This 
work of hers still goes on, and by personal visits and innumerable letters 
she revives and strengthens the life of the Guilds and keeps them in 
immediate touch with the life of their Alma Mater. For eight or ten 
years she has been President of the Alumnae Association, and the two 
chief works accomplished during her regime, the founding of the 
Smedes Scholarship and the enlargement of the Chapel, were both 
greatly furthered by her enthusiasm and practical efforts. 

The writer is not in a position to- tell all that Mrs. Iredell has done 
for St. Mary's ; that is known only to' those who are nearest her and are 
most intimate with her daily life and thoughts, and who realize the full 



24 The St. Mary's Muse. 

strength of the bond between her and the school, but it is hoped enough 
has been said to reveal the purpose of this article, viz., to show St. 
Mary's girls of to-day what Mrs. Iredell was and is to the girls of 
the past and to explain why it is "her children rise up and call her 
blessed." M. 

Alumnae Mews. 



CHARLOTTE NOTES. 

Since Mr. DuBose's visit quite a number of Muses have been circu- 
lated among the Charlotte members of the St. Mary's alumnse, and, 
needless to say, they have been greatly enjoyed. 

Several old St. Mary's girls have recently moved here, among whom 
are Mrs. Francis Osborne (Mary Winder Bryan), Mrs. G. M. Bran- 
son (Alice Smallbones, of Wilmington), and Mrs. W. M. Stitt (Lina 
Battle, of Raleigh). 

Mrs. Gilbert Elliott (Mamie Hill, of Scotland Neck) has been 
spending the winter with her daughter, Mrs. Newcombe. Mrs. Elliott 
was of the Class of 1857. 

We have been very fortunate in seeing quite a good many St. Mary's 
girls during the winter. Besides those already mentioned, Mary Allen 
Short has visited Maud Holt — and we have had glimpses of Mary Hen- 
derson, Octavia Hughes, Louis© Venable and Margaret Bridgers, who 
have at different times visited Florence Thomas and Caro Brevard. 
Then, too, Miss Alice E. Jones passed through, allowing us a most de- 
lightful peep at her. 

Wishing for dear old St. Mary's all kinds of success and assuring the 
Muse of our sympathetic interest, 

Sincerely, An Alumna. 



ST. MARY'S GUILD, COLUMBIA, S. C. 

MARY SUMTER THOMAS, CORRESPONDENT. 

Columbia, S. C, May 1, 1905. 
Among the many educators who attended the Educational Confer- 
ence held in Columbia, April 26th-29th, the Rev. McNeely DuBose 
was one of the most welcomed, for besides his friends and relatives there 



The St. Mary's Muse. 25 

were quite a number of St. Mary's girls in the city who enjoyed seeing 
him. 

The idea, suggested by Dr. DuBose, of organizing a St. Mary's Guild 
in Columbia, was enthusiastically carried out, and on the morning of 
April 29th, at the residence of Mrs. Allen Jones, the St. Mary's girls, 
together with their former Rector, held an interesting and informal 
meeting. Each item of St. Mary's news was accepted with interest and 
pleasure, and each girl went away feeling prouder than ever of her 
Alma Mater; the South Carolina girls determining if possible to en- 
large their roll at St. Mary's. 

Before the close of the meeting, Miss Augusta Jones was elected 
President; Miss Sumter Thomas, Corresponding Secretary, and Miss 
Lucy Heyward, Secretary and Treasurer. 

Among those who attended the meeting were the following: Miss 
Anne Gifford, of Virginia, Miss Marie Phinizy, of Augusta, Misses 
Lucy Heyward, Gussie Jones, Caroline and Sumter Thomas, of Col- 
umbia. 

ALUMNAE NOTES. 

Miss Gussie Jones has been the hostess of a charming house party in 
Columbia, which will long be remembered as one of the most delightful 
ever held in the city. The St. Mary's girls in attendance were Misses 
Anne GifTord, Marie Phinizy and Caro Brevard. 

Miss Marie Phinizy sails for Europe the middle of June, and ex- 
pects to be abroad for at least a year. 

Miss Anne GifTord and Miss Sumter Thomas are looking forward 
with much pleasure to the prospects of attending the Kappa Delta 
banquet to be given at St. Mary's, May thirteenth. 

Even Miss Fannie Williams attended the Educational Conference, 
and during her stay was the guest of Miss Sumter Thomas. 

Miss Lucy Heyward is now boarding at the South Carolina College 
for Women, and has become very prominent in athletics, a short time 
ago having been elected captain of the basket-ball team, which is quite 
an honor at that institution. 



26 The St. Mary's Muse. 



Alumnae Notes. 



Mr. Hodgson was at St. Mary's the week before Easter, and as usual 
his visit was much enjoyed and seemed shorter than ever. We are glad 
that he will be with us again at Commencement. 

Mrs. W. A. Whitaker (Anna Bitting), of Winston, was in Raleigh 
for some days in May, to be near her daughter, Grace, who has not 
been well. It is always a pleasure to have her near St. Mary's, and to 
express some of the appreciation we feel at her constant interest in the 
affairs and welfare of the school. 

An interesting letter came recently to Miss Katie from Mrs. Maggie 
Proctor McCutcheon, of Greenville, Mississippi, who was at St. Mary's 
44 years ago. Mrs. McCutcheon is now in Dr. Bratton's Diocese, and' it 
was through him that she was led to write to Miss McKimmon to 
inquire about St. Mary's and her school mates. She did not know of 
the existence 'of the Aluninse Association, and as she has now been told 
of it, we hope soon to number her among our members. 

On the 17th of April Miss Alice E, Jones passed through Raleigh 
on her way home from Greensboro, and her friends 1 at St. Mary's were 
delighted to welcome her in the two short visits she found time to pay 
to the school. In the two years that have passed since Miss Jones was 
at St. Mary's, many of the girls and teachers have changed, but to the 
small number that knew her then, she seemed to belong as closely to the 
school as if she were still working among us;. Miss Jones is secretary 
of the newly organized Goldsboro branch of the St. Mary's Guild, and 
spoke with interest of the work planned and now going forward. 

In the last number of the Muse we spoke of the improvement in Mr. 
Jeudwine's health. We are glad to say that the improvement has been 
steady. He, with Mrs. Jeudwine, is now at Clifton Springs, New 
York, where the change is benefiting him, and in a few weeks they 
expect to sail for England. It is with deep' regret that their friends 
hear that they will make their home permanently in England, and 
though that is their home, we trust they may still find it possible to 
occasionally return to us, to whom they have endeared themselves so 
closely. 



The St. Mary's Muse. 27 

During- April, invitations were received to the marriage of Florence 
Holt, of Burlington, to Mr. Walter Brooks, of Detroit, April 26th, and 
to the marriage of Mary Warren Cameron, of Fayetteville, to Mr. Jos- 
eph Russell Ross, April 27th. The Muse heartily extends its good 
wishes. 

Miss Katie and Miss Dowd spent Easter in New Bern. Miss Katie 
was the guest of Mr. Fred. Roberts, and Miss Dowd was with Mr. 
George Roberts, whose daughter, Mrs. C. A. Payne (Lillian Roberts), 
of New York, an old St. Mary's girl, was home for a visit. Both the 
ladies were delighted in every way with their trip and are especially 
glad to have had it at this time, now that Mr. George has decided to go 
from New Bern to take up new work at Marietta, Ga. 

Mrs. Mary (Maxwell) Ramsey, of Statesville, passed through Ra- 
leigh on the 5th and stopped over between trains especially to pay a visit 
to St. Mary's. Mrs. Ramsey was here 23 years ago. On this visit she 
found Mr. Sanborn, Mrs. Sanborn, whom she knew then as "Frau- 
lein," and Miss Katie, as representatives of the Faculty of her school 
days. She visited the chapel, and was pleased with the improvements. 
As a member of the Alumnse, she wishes to help the debt on the chapel. 
Mrs. John Frederick Sprague (Kate Hale), of New York, was also a 
recent visitor at St. Mary's, and was delighted with the enlarged chapel 
and the other improvements. 



plea — ply — plue. 



A fly and a flea in a flue 

Were imprisoned ; now what could they do ? 

Said the fly to the flea, "Let us fly." 

"Let us flee," said the flea to the fly. 

So they flew through a flaw in the flue. 

— Woodbury Forest Oracle. 



Advertisements. 



The Editors wish to call the especial attention of the St. Mary's girls and the 
readers of The Muse generally to the advertisements inserted here. It is a good 
principle to patronize those that help you. Let the advertisers see that it pays 
them to advertise in The Muse, and make those who do not advertise realize that 
it is their loss not ours. 



North Carolina's Leading Dry Goods Store. 

Dobbin & Ferrall 

(At Tucker's Store.) 
123 and 125 Fayetteville Street. 



Perfectly equipped mail order service. Cor- 
respondence solicited. 



We prepay postage, express or freight charge 

anywhere in North Carolina on all cash 

mail orders amounting to $5.00 

or more. 

DOBBIN & FERRALL. 



Established 1858. 

H. MAHLER'S SONS 

JEWELERS 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA. 



Dry Goods, Millinery, 
Tailored Costumes, 
Gloves, Hosiery, 
Hand kerchiefs , 
Underwear, 
Fancy Goods. 



Mail orders filled intelligently and promptly. 



FAYETTEVILLE AND SALISBURY STS. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



...Send to.. 



ALFR 



D WILLIAMS 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



SCO., 



BOOKS, 

OF ALL KINDS. 

Select line of STATIONERY. 

Eastman's Kodaks and sup= 
plies. Office supplies. 

HAVE.... 



TO MAKE YOUR 



Remember it PAYS to g-et the BEST. 



HART-WARD HARDWARE COMPANY, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Best of everything in Hardware. Satisfaction 

guaranteed or money refunded. All-right 

Cook Stoves, Celebrated Warm Air 

Heaters, the only perfect heater 

made. Write for prices. 



SHERWARD HSGGS & CO. 

Everything in 

DRY GOODS 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



Advertisements. 



f . C. STROHACH'S SOU'S CO., 

GROCERS 



215 FAYETTEVILLE STREET. 

FOR QUICK COOKING 

nothing: exceeds the 

GAS RANGE. 

Always ready. No dirt or ashes. 

FOR LIGHT 

Use the Best: THE WELSBACH LIGHT 

STANDARD GAS AND ELECTRIC CO., 

124 FAYETTEVILLE ST. 

JNO. P. HAYES, Photographer. 

Kodak work of all kinds. 

Don't forget to buy your Shoes of 

S. C. POOLE'S Shoe Store. 

KING'S UP-TO-DATE DRUG STORE 

A.ND SODA FOUNTAIN. 
Corner Fayetteville and Hargett Streets. 

You'll And up-to-date Shoes at 

HUNTER BROS. & BREWER. 

ELLINGTON'S ART STORE, 

Raleigh. N. C. 
Everything in Art.' 
Embroidery Materials, Wools and Zephyrs. 



Private Dining and Banquet Halls at 

GIERSCH'S, 216 Fayetteville St. 

THOS. H. BRIGGS & SONS, Raleigh, N. C— 
Hardware, Paints, House Furnishings and 
Stoves. We endeavor to give a faithful ser- 
vice and value. 

DARNELL & THOMAS, 
Pianos and Organs. 
Sheet music and small goods. 
Raleigh, N. C. 



KING'S GROCERY, 

" The Little Store." 



M. Rosenthal & Company 



GROCERS 



136 FAYETTEVILLE STREET. 



Good things always at 

BRETSCH'S BAKERY. 

Buy ROYSTER'S Fine Candies. 

Fine Sporting Goods. 

T. C. POWELL, 

COAL AND WOOD, 

107 Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 

THE J. D. RIGGAN COMPANY, 

Holiday Goods. 

WEATHERS & UTLEY, 

Art Dealers. 

MISSES REESE & COMPANY, 

Millinery. 

CALIFORNIA FRUIT STORE. 

Fruit and Confections. 

ANTICEPHALALGINE cures quickly and 
safely Headache in all its forms. 

JOLLY & WYNNE JEWELRY COMPANY 

Wedding and Holiday presents. 
Fine Watch and Jewelry repairing. 

CROWELUS 
DRUG STORE. 

120 Fayetteville Street. 

For the most satisfactory work, 

Try RIGGSBEE at 
Watson & Co'p., Gallery. PHOTOGRAPHS. 

T. W. BLAKE, 

Rich Jewelry and Silverware. 
Repairing promptly done. 



PERRY & ROSENTHAL, Trust Bldg. 
Ladies' Fine Shoes. 

Dk V. E. TURNER, 
Dentist. 



Advertisements. 



SAL VA TORE DESIO, 

Manufacturing- Jeweler and Silversmith. 

1012 F. St., N. W., Washington, D. O. 

On application will send any article selected. 
To St. Mary's, discount of ten per cent. 

YOUNG & HUGHES, 

Plumbers, Steam and Gas Fitters. 
121 Fayetteville Street. 



If its furnishing the Home, Office, School or 

Hall, see us. 

ROYALL & BORDEN FURNITURE CO., 

Cor. Wilmington and Hargett Streets, 

RA.LEIGH, N. C. 

CHARLES W. BARRETT— Aechitect 
Special Work in Fine Colonial Architecture. 
Author of 
"Colonial Southern Homes." 
115>^ Fayetteville St. Raleigh, N. C. 



Wmk 





*BESTGROCEPS j 



ROBT. SIMPSON, ^gggg etc. 

JOHN C. DREWRY. 
"MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE." 

JOHNSON & JOHNSON, 

COAL, WOOD AND ICE. 

122 Fayetteville St Raleigh, N. C. 

We make your shopping with us "pleasant" 
as well as "profitable." 

A. B. STRONACH COMPANY. 

Outfitters for Ladies, Misses and Children. 

Commencement Dress Materials and Acces- 
sories — Gloves, Fans, Hosiery, Shoes, — receive 
our special attention. 

215 Fayetteville Street. 

GEO. MARSH & CO., 

Wholesale Groceries, Produce, Fruit, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



The National BanK of Raleigh, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 

Capital $225,000. Surplus and Profits 8115,000. 



Chas. H Belvin, President. 

Chas. E. Johnson, Vice-President. 

F. H. Briggs, Cashier. 

J. B. Timberlake, Teller and Ass't Cashier. 



Safe Deposit Boxes in Fire and Burglar Proof 
Vault for rent at moderate cost. Absolutely 
safe place lor keeping valuables of all kind. 



Directors: 

C. M. Busbee, James A. Briggs, T. B. Crowder 

Julius Lewis, Chas. E. Johnson, F. O. Moring, 

Chas. H. Belvin, J. W. Harden, Jr. 

A . D U G H I , 

RESTAURANT AND ICE CREAM PARLOR. 

Confections, Foreign and Domestic Fruits. 

CATERER. 

St. Mary's folk know and approve of Dughi. 

STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES. 
Fruits, Vegetables and Country Pro- 
duce. The best of everything and at rock 
bottom prices. Special prices to schools and 
colleges. D. T. JOHNSON & SONS. 

Phone 78. 163 Hargett St. 

H. STEIN METZ, 

FLORIST. 

Roses, Carnations, Violets, Wedding Bouquets 

Floral Designs, Palms, Ferns and all kinds , 

Raleigh.] of Plants. [Phone 113. 

J. S. MacDONALD & CO., Jewelers. 

Diamonds, Watches, Clocks, Silverware, 

Jewelry, Class Rings, Medals and 

Badges to order. 

217 N. Charles St. Baltimore, Md. 

HELLER'S SHOE STORE. 

GYMNASIUM SHOES. 

RALEIGH SAVINGS BANK. 
Capital $15,000 Surplus $25,000. 

Deposits over $600,000. 
Four per cent interest paid on deposits. 

Our ECCLESIASTICAL ART Department is 

superbly equipped for the prompt and proper 
execution of fine church work such as Altars, 
Pulpits, Lecturns, Prayer Desks, Litany 
Desks, Rood Screens, Fonts, and similar 
furnishings. Write for special church fur- 
niture catalogue. 

HANN-WANGERIN-WEICKHARDT CO., 

Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

J. R. FERRALL & CO.— Grocers. 

Best cf everything in our line. 

22 Fayetteville Street. 



Advertisements. 



SEABOARD 

AIR LINE RAILWAY. 

The Shortest and Quickest Route Between North 

and South. 

DOUBLE DAILY SERVICE from New York to Florida points, 
Norfolk, Portsmouth to Atlanta and the principal cities of the 
South. Through Pullman services New York to Jacksonville and 
Tampa; also Atlanta, with direct connections for New Orleans, 
Nashville, Birmingham, Memphis, St.Louis, and all points in Texas, 
California and Mexico. 

LOCAL SERVICES. Special attention is called to our conven- 
ient local passenger service throughout the entire system. 

For schedule to any point, rates, time-tables, pamphlets, reser- 
vations or general information, apply to ticket agents or address, 

C. H. GATTIS, T. P. A., C. B. RYAN, G. P. A., 

RALEIGH, N. C. PORTSMOUTH, VA. 



RALEIGH IRON WORKS, 

Boilers, Engines, 
Machinery, 

Raleigh, North Carolina. 


CHOICE CUT FLOWERS 

At J. L. O'QUINN & CO. 

Leading Florist of North Carolina. 
Raleigh, N. C. 






ELLINGTON LUMBER COMPANY, 

All Sort of Building Supplies, 
RALEIGH, N. C. 


DIAMONDS, WATCHES, SILVERWARE, 

H. SILVERTHORN CO. 
917 Main Street, Lynchburg, Va. 


Patronize the 


and Pins. 


EXCELSIOR STEAM LAUNDRY, 
FIRST-CLASS LAUNDRY WORK. 


PENN MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO. 

R. B. RANEY, general Agent, 

RALEIGH, N. C. 




GRIMES & VASS, 

Fire Insurance and Investments. 

Raleigh, N C 


E. M. UZZELL & CO., 

PRINTERS A.VD BINDERS, 

ONLY HIGH GRADE WORK. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 


J. SCHWARTZ, 


INSURE AGAINST LOSS BY FIRE. 

Best Companies Represented. 

Bonding Solicited 

THE MECHANICS DIME SWINGS BANK, 

Raleigh, N. C. 


RICHMOND MARKET. 

Meats of All Kinds. 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



vocation Central for the Carolinas. 

Climate Healthy and Sal 



St. Mary's School, 



RALEIGH, N. C. 



(for girls and young women). 



64th ANNUAL SESSION BEGINS SEPTEMBER 21, 1905. 



SESSION DIVIDED INTO TWO TERMS. 

EASTER TERM BEGINS JANUARY 25. 1906. 



St.-Mary'fi 

offers instruction in these 
Departments : 



i. THE COLLEGE. 

2. THE MUSIC SCHOOL. 
< 3. THE BUSINESS SCHOOL. 
J 4. THE ART SCHOOL. 
\ o. THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL. 



In 1904-5 were enrolled 225 students from 16 Dioceses 

Twentv-five Members in the Faculty 



Well Furnished, Progressive Music Department, much Equipment New. Twenty-eight 
Pianos. Mew Miller Grand Piano Just Added. 

Special attention to Die Social and Christian Side of Education without slight 
to the scholastic (raining. ?%£ 

For Catalogue and other information address 

SjjK^ B.D. % j§i 

^^^H £3*3 RECTOR. 











1 
Date Due 


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